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on 28 August 2016
This is an incredible book and a must read. Judith Kerr shares the partly autobiographical story of her Jewish family fleeing Nazi Germany when she was only 9. The child perspective makes this story funny, sad, poignant and realistic. Anna is a beautiful character; a young girl not fully understanding the horrors of the adult world that have forced her family to flee but facing her new nomadic life of diminished circumstances with determination and adventure. An important read for parents to share with their children about WW2.
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on 18 May 2014
A delightful, honest, funny, thought provoking book. Written from the child, Anna, point of view and also loosely based on the authors childhood. Anna was a 9 year old German born Jew living in Germany just before Hitler became into power. Because of Anna's fathers job as a writer, who wrote anti Nazi articles, Anna and her family had to flee from Germany and live the life of a refugee in a foreign country. This story follows their escape and their new life. The story ends 3 years later in another new country and I can't wait to continue to learn how Anna and her family cope.
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on 28 April 2013
Judith Kerr is a treasure.This is the first part of her story. This book is probably aimed at anyone aged between 8-12 or schools. As an adult I found it simply told but compelling. It would be an inspiration for any child and particularly for anyone whose family have migrated to Britain. However it isn't told in a modern style with action packed events holding the imagination. Ideal perhaps for a 'bookish' child or any adult wishes to talk through past events with someone young. I went on to order the other books in the trilogy and loved those too, but they are aimed at older teenagers with the last possibly appealing to a young adult,
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on 2 March 2015
I cannot imagine how I managed to get through an entire career of teaching English without reading this lovely book but it was therefore a treat for my retirement. The story is told without romanticism or melodrama and with a healthy dash of humour and self-knowledge; it consequently conveys the dreadful circumstances all the more powerfully. I shall be making sure my grandchildren get to read it along-side the so much bleaker "Boy in the Striped Pyjamas'.
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on 14 September 2009
Judith Kerr is known to at least a generation of parents and children for her books about Mog, the forgetful cat. Here is her unforgetable autobography (volume 1). It describes the last-minute escape of Judith's Jewish family from Nazi Germany, via France to England. It's told from the perspective, and increasing understanding of a little girl whose beloved cuddly toy is left behind. The crisis is dramatic but thought-provokingly underplayed; her attitude of stocic courage taken for granted.
This recording is much shorter than the book but well-put together and immediately accessible. For adults and thoughtful children from 8+. Start here; go onto read the trilogy which takes the heroine to young adulthood. I wish it were issued on cd. Until then listen to this cassette. You'll gain information, understanding and have much to discuss.
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on 14 February 2015
I can't believe that anyone could possibly give this less than 5 stars. Having read the few negative reviews though, it's clear that the problem is with the reviewers, not the book.
I first read this at German evening classes (in German, clearly) and it was a book that I just wanted to read. My German has got more rusty over the years, but this book is shiny and fresh. It's a very personal tale, along the lines of Anne Frank's diary and explains the effect of Hitler and the Nazis on the life of a small girl.
My best suggestion? Well, it may sound a little totalitarian, but I'd make it compulsory reading, doubly so before a national election, so that people remember the possible consequences of their actions.
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on 31 January 2015
On the television there was a programme which spoke to the author and although it is a children's book which is in the syllabus for German schools a good read for adults as well especially if some of the more graphic books are too disturbing another book or film is the boy in the blue striped pajamas. It is very well and sympathetically written and even with the subject that it covers a enjoyable read but also thought provoking
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on 17 May 2016
I really enjoyed this book and seeing the war from a different perspective. It is not terrifying because Anna does not realise quite how serious the situation and their various escapes were but, as an adult with th benefit of hindsight, they were very lucky that their father took the threat of Nazism seriously enough to act without worrying about leaving their house and comfortable life, so many others waited and hoped and paid the ultimate price.
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on 27 February 2015
I think this is great to learn children about the holocaust in a easy way for children to understand.I've always loved Judith kerr books from to tiger who came to tea to mogs books and found out about this one when she was been interview on imagination and I've also listened to the radio 4 extra play of it that I also enjoyed.
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on 2 January 2014
I bought this book for my mother after watching a documentary about the author Judith Kerr. She is a brilliant illustrator, now in her nineties. In spite of her terrible experiences of losing her parents and being a German refugee she is the most charming and positive person who relates her story without over stating the facts. It shows an indomitable spirit and zest for life, no matter what it throws at you.
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