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3.2 out of 5 stars
56
3.2 out of 5 stars
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on 15 September 2003
I must admit that I also think this sequel is not as good as the first book.
Man and Boy is a 5/5; a really enjoyable read with some poignant moments critiquing modern society. This book, however, goes nowhere near the first books' intelligence. While it was still an enjoyable read, I found the characters' actions very frustrating.
The faults of the modern throw-away culture Parsons used to fuel the first book no longer seemed so central; the errors all seemed to be due to the irritating actions of his characters. I also found this book somewhat less hopeful and less warming.
It IS still worth a read, but I must warn anyone that it doesn't live up to the excellence of the first book.
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on 5 January 2016
Great book - love it.
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on 19 October 2003
Just finished the book and I must say that it was a delight to read. I could not put it down. He has the abity to bring out the reality yet finding a sense of humour at the same. A plus in my eyes
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on 2 August 2014
I loved this story
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on 10 November 2014
didn't disappoint
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on 2 July 2003
The sequel to Parson's earlier novel, "Man and Boy", "Man and Wife" stands on its own as a poignant commentary on relationships and the family in this modern and most turbulent world of ours - about why we fall in love and why we marry - about why we stay and why we go...
Continuing the story of jaded thirty something, Harry Silver, "Man and Wife" begins with a hopeful up-swing by opening with his marriage to new wife, Cyd. Harry spends the earlier part of the novel, desperately trying to 'blend' together his new family with varying degrees of success, and by some measure, failure. His relationship with his ex-wife,Gina, becomes increasingly strained through his well-meaning, but abortive attempts to be a good father to young son, Pat, and they reflect well the dilema of all 'Saturday dads' everywhere, not least so because whilst adjusting to life without his beloved son, he has to live with the daily reality of a new full-time step daughter.
Perhaps the driving impetus of the novel, is the internal conflict within the protagonist as he simultaneously yearns for the traditional family values, embodied in the character of his late father, whilst finding himself very much a product of our have-it-all-then-throw-it-away culture, albeit against his will. Harry's 'problem' is that he continues to chase rainbows, and even with the sharp memory of one failed marriage behind him, once the mundanity and challenges of married life establish themself within his new reconstituted household, he finds some other excuse to seek the ultimate soul mate elsewhere. His rasping, self-deprecating self-awareness punctuates the narrative throughout, particularly effective in his pithy one liners.
Harry's saving grace is that he is a more of a disappointment to himself than he is to anyone else in his life and the weight of failure that he carries around is palpable, so much so that you can't help warming to him immensely.
"Man and Wife" is a novel that speaks to our 'commitmentphobic' generation: to the rainbow chasers, who always believe that there is someone better out there for them; to the eternal romantics, who are looking for their one-and-only; to the idealists, who always spot that patch of grass that is so much greener; to the want-it-alls, who want it now.
And without apology, it asks us to ask the question: What do we do when the ordinary invades the extraordinary? Do we have the guts to live with our own reality...or are we going to spend our life chasing rainbows...? (and has anyone ever found that pot of gold???)
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on 5 December 2014
Brilliant story
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on 13 July 2015
Good book
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on 7 June 2010
DO AUTHOR,S THINK OF THIER BOOKS AS OBJECTS THAT GIVE EMENSE PLEASURE. TONY PARSONS HAS A HABIT OF BECOMING A FRIEND, ONE LONGS TO MEET.

WE ARE WELL INTO OUR SEVENTY YEARS, AND I READ TO MY WIFE EVERY MORNING, READING MR PARSONS IS SHARING EMOTIONS THAT ARE TRULY

REAL. ONE FEELS THE PAIN AND JOY, LAUGH AND SHEDS A TEAR. WONDERFUL WORK. PASSING THE BOOKS ON TO FRIENDS AND THE EXPERIENCE IS REPEATED.

THANK YOU.

JOHN. WATAMU KENYA.
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on 7 May 2015
A gift
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