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Customer reviews

4.7 out of 5 stars
92
4.7 out of 5 stars
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on 25 April 2017
Loved this book, enjoy an immersive escape into ancient more natural worlds and ways of living.
I ordered this from a recommendation by a friend, when it came I showed my sister & she told me she had it - in fact she'd lent it to me and it was sitting beside me as I ordered it, beneath another book. I didn't mind, this was an amazing story to read.
I prefer the Celtic traditions & ways of life portrayed in this book than in The Dark Mirror (but I love that one too).
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on 15 March 2017
Juliet Marillier is my favourite writer nowadays. This book is a absolute must, and even though it's long, you will find yourself rushing till the end. I strongly recommend it.
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on 5 March 2017
Utterly brilliant, I couldn't put it down, what a wonderful re-telling of the old Grimm fairy tale
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on 25 August 2017
Excellent,thanks
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on 16 April 2015
this book is a great read
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on 18 July 2017
Great book couldn't put it down
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on 3 March 2017
A lovely book. The author is an experienced weaver of tales. Beautifully descriptive. You feel you are right in the midst of the forest and can almost feel it's breath. This is a mystical tale with just the right amount of folk lore, magic and history intertwined. The characters are a delight. I am already on to book two in this series. Recommended
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VINE VOICEon 31 December 2003
This is the best book ever written, I beg anyone who reads this not to shed a tear, there are some heart warming moments, some sad.
I read this book in 1 day and the whole trilogy in 3 this is the best out of all the three and I had to go back and re-read this after I had finished I just did not want the story to end.
I initially bought this because it said 'sset in the era of Mists Of Avalon' another book I love but, I personally believe it is just a touch better than Mists.
If you buy this book you will not regret it.
I look forward to more from Juliet Marrillier.
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on 24 January 2013
And so, my love affair with Juliet Mariller's writing continues. I'd been so looking forward to this. After reading my very first Marillier book,[...], last year and absolutely loving it to pieces, I decided to go right back to the beginning with this, her début novel, Daughter of the Forest. It's loosely based on the Brother's Grimm fairy tale, The Six Swans, about a girl who, had she been born male, would have been the seventh son of a seventh son. Instead, she is the much doted on sister of six older brothers, and daughter to a stoic but steadfast father. Set in a magical ancient Ireland, the beauty of Marillier's historical fantasy setting has once again completely captured my imagination, and Sorcha has won my heart with her determination against impossible odds, and the way she handled the nightmarish tasks set before her. A heroine worthy of respect, if ever there was one. The story spans 3-4 years and so feels quite grand on that scale, and yet the biggest aspect by far is the growth of Sorcha's character as she goes from a sheltered, protected girl of twelve, to... well, you'll just have to read it and see.

The cast of characters was quite large, Sorcha's six brothers alone making it so, not to mention everyone else she meets along the way. The secondary characters were all wonderfully realized a fleshed out. I made a comment in another review recently about cartoonish, over-the-top characterisation. I won't repeat myself, but let's just say that THIS is how your write subtly different siblings! You get to know a couple of them much more than others, but each had merit in their own way.

I found it impossible not to make comparisons to Shadowfell. Having read her most recent work first, then gone back to her earliest book, I was able to see the changes in her writing over the decade or so, particularly in the tone. This was a lot more formal, which occasional made it feel slightly stilted, but it was just as evocative and, once I'd found my flow, the hours slipped by without notice.

My favourite aspect, by far, was the romance. It was a long time coming, and the characters are painfully timid and awkward about it, but it was really beautiful. I may be slightly unnerved by Sorcha's young age, but those were the times, I guess. Their definition of "marriageable age" being very different from our own.

If I could wish for one thing, it would be that the beginning wasn't quite so slow to get going, and that Sorcha didn't spend so much of the book being 12. But I didn't feel that either of those things were enough for me to drop a star. The magic, the journey, the romance and the sense of triumph were more than enough to make up for any weak spots.

5 Stars ★★★★★
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on 22 August 2007
A fantastic tale based on a Germanic tale by Brothers Grimm called "The Six Swans". It's a fabulous tale of loss, betrayal and love winning out in the end. Very well written with vivid characters you really start to care about (especially Sorcha the main female who is the seventh child of a seventh son).

The back and tagline say it is "a sweeping Celtic romance" which I am not sure I agree with. The romance aspect doesn't come into the book until near the end, it's much more rooted in mythology and folk tales including the fae and magic along the way. A good comparison would be The Mists of Avalon by Marion Zimmer Bradley which tells the Arthurian myths from the female characters eyes.

At the end there are a lot of loose ends which will make the other two books in the series interesting to follow. I can't wait to read more of her writing.
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