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3.7 out of 5 stars
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3.7 out of 5 stars
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on 9 July 2001
How sadly appropriate that this work should bear in its title the word 'tear' for it is surely a threnody, a lament for the skill of a man who was arguably the greatest fantasy writer of our time after Tolkein.
Feist's great ability was to describe his worlds in intricate detail and to bring forth characters that sprang from the pages in their realism. When magic and fantastical acts occured the reader could accept these without question. A talking dragon, a rift in space, a goblin, all were as believable as a taxi in London or New York.
His characters were real people and he made them interact with each other just as real people do, it did not matter that they were fighting the forces of darkness and evil aided by magic.
'Tear' on the other hand presents us with a plot so shallow that it is not worthy of the name. The work is so full of gratuitous slaughter that it lacks the moral depth of earlier works. The characters are automata, poor Squire James is but a shadow of his earlier self. Even the syntax is second rate and just how many 'deft blows' must one expect in one book?
Was this book really written by the same Promethean author who gave the world 'Magician'and 'A Darkness at Sethanon' - come on Feist you can do better than this!
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on 6 March 2001
I love Feist's books and have done since I picked up Magician, whilst casting around for something new to read in a bookshop, for no other reason than its cover. "Krondor: The Betrayal" was not Feists best book, and although this is from the same series, it's definitely back to form. Like all good Feist books it practically reads itself you get so engrossed in the story!
I am hoping that he will do a similar 'filling the gaps' type series for the riftwar (Magician) era, as even with the authors-cut there are still many things only touched upon.
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on 10 July 2001
The trilogy started with Krondor: The Betrayal which was taken from a computer game and showed all the signs of its origins.
Krondor: The Assassins was something of a return to form with a reliance on some of the more familiar Feist characters such as James and William.
However Tear of the Gods is more akin to Betrayal as again it betrays its computer game origins. The book is a series of set pieces much as you would find in a fantasy RPG on your PC. The characters walk around, meet someone, are given quests and then go and have a fight.
The basic story is quite good, but it needed to be fleshed out more with increased characterization.
The series does shed some light on some of the events in the Serpentwar Saga and for that I would recommend this series to devotees of Feist, however for the casual reader, they would be more advised to read the Riftwar Saga or the Empires Trilogy
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on 23 February 2001
After the Serpentwar saga, which was particularly enjoyable for beginning to move the series in new directions, Feist has decided to return to an earlier period of Midkemian history and to older, staler situations. With this installment, Feist has once more sacrificed his imagination and slavishly - not to mention tediously - carved out another book based on a computer game.
The plot and tone never escape the simplistic and no new ground is covered... The book is a morass of cliches and caricatures, including the feisty (no pun intended) young magician heroine, a tough (and Scottish sounding, sorry that's Dwarvish in Midkemia, isn't it?) warrior priest who oozes old-campaigner style advice and the cowardly character who overcomes his fears long enough to be useful. Oh and I nearly forgot the dastardly, dastardly villain.
And then there are the fight scenes. Lots and lots of fight scenes. After every couple of pages of tedious dialogue or exposition, Feist seems to feel obligated to produce another identi-kit style battle sequence, occasionally changing the nature of the opponent, but never the level of stupidity.
Ultimately, this book has nothing more to offer than padding out the scraps of information given out during the Serpentwar and something to prop up the coffee-table...
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on 23 January 2001
As a fan of the Riftwar saga, this book, and The Betrayal are no where near up to the same standard. It is patently obvious that this was taken from a role playing computer game, with characters more set in their "types" of theif, fighter, magician etc. Part of the success and readability of the first works of his is that they were supra-types: characters rose above the shallow but necessary compartments of the role playing genre and characters such as Thomas became mighty warriors also imbued with magic, and characters such as Arutha had none of these traits yet still managed to become the lead character. With this new series we clearly see that characters have been put in neat little boxes and Feist rushed this out to make a quick buck.
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I'm reviewing Feists' (and those involved with him) works in Chronological order. Unfortunately for some books there are new books and covers being re-released in March 2013 so reviews for the old books can no longer be posted. Not so clever AMAZON.

Anyway this review is for the chronological reading of books by Feist and others that all link Medkemia and Kelewan and form the Riftwar Saga, Legacy and beyond. This one is for Krondor: Tear of the Gods. This is the third of three books currently available.

The order is:-

Magician 5 stars
Jimmy the Hand 2 Stars
Horored Enemy 4 stars
Murder in LaMuT 3 stars.
Daughter of the Empire 5 stars
Silverthorn 4.5 stars
Darkness at Sethanon 5 stars
Servant of the Empire 5 stars
Krondor: The Betrayal 3 Stars
Mistress of the Empre 5 stars
Krondor: The Assassins 3 Stars
KRONDOR: TEAR OF THE GODS 3 STARS

and so on ... look for the rest of the reviews in the coming months.

OK so to set some context. Raymond got into bed with Sierra over a video game based on his novels. He then, for whatever reason, decided to try and write novels alongside the game. (All of this can be found on his website) These novels lack all of the in depth flavour and thrills that the Riftwar Saga produced. It's as if they were written by someone else. The characters lack depth and colour and simply seem to behave ina shallow and superficial maner. The plots are boring and in fact you can imagine them being little side quests in a computer game. All in all a lot of damage doen to his reputation. I'm *really* looking forward to re-reading the next few books which are not associated with this awful period of writing. I have heard that JIMMY and THE CRAWLER (The forth book in the series has been started. This is apparently free of the game's/Sierra's influence so I have high hoped for it when it comes out but I'l look at that later. There's rumours of a fifth book. Lets see. Anyway the book was given 3 stars and to be fair 2 of them were simply because this is feist and his previous works keep me coming back but if it had been anyone else he'd have been toast.
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I'm reviewing Feists' (and those involved with him) works in Chronological order. Unfortunately for some books there are new books and covers being re-released in March 2013 so reviews for the old books can no longer be posted. Not so clever AMAZON.

Anyway this review is for the chronological reading of books by Feist and others that all link Medkemia and Kelewan and form the Riftwar Saga, Legacy and beyond. This one is for Krondor: The Assassins. This is the second of three books currently available.

The order is:-

Magician 5 stars
Jimmy the Hand 2 Stars
Horored Enemy 4 stars
Murder in LaMuT 3 stars.
Daughter of the Empire 5 stars
Silverthorn 4.5 stars
Darkness at Sethanon 5 stars
Servant of the Empire 5 stars
Krondor: The Betrayal 3 Stars
Mistress of the Empre 5 stars
KRONDOW: THE ASSASSINS 3 STARS
and so on ... look for the rest of the reviews in the coming months.

So this book follows on from Krondor the betrayal. It's as equally lackluster and poorly paced as the afor mentioned book. The reason for this (and to be honest I'm starting to tire of looking for excuses for Raymond) is I believe is the tie in with Sierra who were producing the computer game . The basic problem is the game was produced under licence *but* then Raymond tried to write books to follow the games and it's basically caused him to produce 3 books that frankly lack any of the rich story telling that Raymond produced for Magician. Looking back I guess Raymond like everyone was just trying to make as much money as possible by licencing his world, writing books to complement games, allowing others to write books for him (that's didn't have the same ability) etc. etc. All in all he's probably doing very well thank you but these books and the others he co-authored (apart from Janny Wurts) are simply rubbish. If this had been his first offerings he'd have been consigned to the heap. So while I keep reading desperate to see some of the wonderful stuff we saw at the begining of his writing career I'd caution anyone about going beyond his first 3 books and Janny Wurts' complimantary trilogy as well. C'Mon Raymond be brave and give us something original !
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on 22 January 2006
It's already been emphasised in other reviews, but the Riftwar Legacy isn't the strongest of Raymond E. Feist's sagas. Kronder: The Assassins is, quite apparently, the strongest of the series, which is attributed to the fact that it’s the only one not converted from a computer game, but that isn't to say that Kronder: The Betrayal and Kronder: Tear of the Gods are completely worthless.
Unlike others, I don't think it's fair to discard Betrayal and ToG as poor novels - they don't stand up to the rest of Feist's work, but that isn't to say they don’t have a strong purpose and a place in Feist's world of Midkemia. Especially with the newly released Conclave of the Shadows and Darkwar series, Tear of the Gods provides a valuable insight into the newly developing character of Leso Varen, otherwise known as Sidi: the arch-nemesis of Pug.
From a literary perspective, Tear of the Gods isn't all that great a book. It's painfully apparent that it’s based on its digital counterpart, but the story in itself is compelling enough to make it an interesting read. A big plus for me is the central role that Pug's son, William, plays in the book (as he does in Assassins). In the central sagas of Midkemia, Will always plays a relatively minor part, but his character is greatly expanded upon in Tear of the Gods and, might I add, a hell of a lot better in the book than in the game.
All in all, Tear of the Gods is a decent read. I would strongly advise it to die-hard fans of Feist but, to those who only read his works casually, you may want to stay clear. I personally greatly enjoyed the book, but my character fits into the former of the two.
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on 30 October 2003
How did he get this published?! I always considered writers to have a little more integrity than to put out something based on their name alone. Guess I was wrong, huh?!
PREDICTABLE STORYLINE, USELESS CHARACTERISATION, DULL ACTION!
Please don't read this if you're a Feist fan, it won't do you any favours.
Not one to mix my words THIS IS AWFUL! Seriously, I can't imagine what he was thinking.
Buy the Rigante series by David Gemmell, or re-read Magician.
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on 31 October 2013
This is by far a better book than the previous 2nd volume Assassins of Krondor, which was very much a filler, and not that great at even doing that. This however moves at some pace and has an impressive array of challenges from the forces of evil which James and new character Jazhara,the new court wizard, have to overcome. Its very much a classic Thief, Wizard, Priest, Warrior group setting out on a complicated quest. Overarching this is an unknown evil genius, seen in the last novel, with an mysterious agenda and dubious methods to achieve his goal, manipulating a series of minions and dark forces. The action is great, as are the set pieces and the puzzles, with a complexity between the different elements retaining reader interest until the end.
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