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on 8 February 2014
I had seen a copy of this book before and I was reminded of it when seeing the Railwayman Film when Patti looked through the book to learn about what Eric had experienced.

Eric Lomax in his book and Ronald in this book in both the words and pictures with the grim statistics of those young men who did not return give more depth to the inscription on the Kohima war cemetary memorial.

"When you go home
Tell them of us and say,
For your tomorrow,
we gave our today."

Harold Atcherley's book Prisoner of Japan also provides detailed background of the time.

Thinking about myself and my children at their age when prisoners I find it hard to grasp how young people in their early twenties found the reserves of strength to survive when isolated from everything else in their previous lives.

Hopefully with these records in pictures and text the awful and sad events described will not be forgotten.
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on 13 August 2017
Ronald Searles account and drawings of this aspect of the War are a priceless record.
This book is a must for all those who had relatives that suffered as a JPOW.
Especially those that took the same November 1941 journey aboard the Polish Ship - The Sobieski to Halifax from Greenock and then the USS Mount Vernon from Halifax to Singapore via Cape Town and Mombasa.
My Father like Mr Searle was born in 1920 and he took the exact same journey - miraculously surviving over three and a half years as a POW working on the notorious 'Death Railway'...
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on 24 March 2013
Beautiful collection of drawings that serves as a witness of remarkable time and place in history and
harrowing experiences during WWII. The drawings intimately convey events as they occur and portray
in individual detail the tedium, the brutality of conditions under enemy imprisonment as well as moments
of grace. Searle drily describes his experiences and gives a human face to chronology of battles.
Amazing feat of recording his experiences as serviceman routed to Singapore then taken prisoner of war.
Ronald Searle is a notable artist but these drawings also exhibit his incredible spirit under extremely
trying circumstances. He miraculously survived and these drawings survived, hidden by comrades
dying but still fighting in spirit. Sensitively drawn and touching record of an artist, a soldier, a man.
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on 2 November 2016
Exquisite agony. The forms, the shapes of hurt. Worries about being of a generation that has known nothing like this. Hopes that we never shall. Stories with the pictures show how infernal things were. Painful, but wonderful draftsmanship to the very last ebb of life.
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on 5 August 2017
Excellent book about the brutality disease and torture and ultimately death of those POWs captured in September 1942 in Singapore and those survived a brutal regime finally released in 1945. My uncle was captured alongside Ronald Neame in the Royal Engineers.
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on 21 September 2015
A wonderful account of war experience, beautifully presented. I have read books about the experiences of Japanese prisoners of war, but this book proves that a picture really does paint a thousand words. It takes you right into the world of the prisoner.
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on 1 March 2013
The recent passing of Ronald Searle gives this book of his war drawings special standing. Known across the world subsequently for his innovative and lively cartoon style, the pen drawings in this book, completed while a young prisoner and hidden from the Japanese under the severest conditions, are a permanent testament to his drawing skill and acute observation, and are valued now as an important historical record by a wider audience.
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on 27 February 2016
Very prompt delivery. This book - an ex-library copy - was in excellent condition, had been expertly covered and had no markings on either text or drawings. It was just what I wanted to inform a presentation I was preparing on Searle, being his own account of his war years and thus providing much personal input to flesh out his Wikipedia entry.
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on 10 January 2018
Fabulous drawings of vicious guards, and cruelly abused POWs. Ronald Searle risked his life when making these sketches. The prose that accompanies the illustrations is spare, and poignant.
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on 10 November 2013
This book should be shown in every school in the country, this shows mans inhumanity to man, unfortunately Ronald Searle is no longer with us, and I wish I could have read this book while he was alive. If you can get a copy, get one.
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