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on 7 September 2017
Found this series by mistake and so glad I did. Entertainment and explosive action in every chapter. I recommend you read in order to get an understanding how events interact one word of warning forget about doing anything else when you start to read as you will not be able to put the book down. Now on series 8 which draws closure on Matt and team spears first encounter with mystical stories and personal revenge
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on 12 September 2017
First book of David's I've read,did it more because my other favourite authors( Kuzneski,McDermott,Gibbins,) had nothing new out. Absolutely loved it,now going to start the rest of the series. Not going in to plot,read the cover if you want to know,but as adventure archeological thrillers go,it is certainly up there.Just take your brain out of gear and enjoy. Better than James Rollins in my opinion
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on 26 November 2013
In a nutshell - I paid 99p for this book and I might read the next one, but only if it was free!
I think you have to read this as a comic, just "going with the flow" and ignoring the glaring and unbelievable flaws in the plot line. It was as far fetched as India Jones and the later James Bond films, so you have to suspend belief and enjoy it as a fast paced, action packed fantasy.

Ex-SAS, Matt Drake and his sidekicks - a female USA cop and a nerdy boy, Ben - join up with the Swedish and USA equivalent of SAS troops to fight not one, but two lots of fanatics who want to find the tomb of Odin, the God. They miraculously discover a treasure hidden deep under a mountain, after 10 minutes, by merely jumping on a marker stone, which any tourist or local villager could have discovered over the centuries! They find their way through this minefield of traps - only to be beaten by one lot of the enemy.
And so on. This sort of thing happens in lots of countries, following the trail left by Odin and uncovered mostly by the boy, Ben who is a computer geek. Ben acted so young sometimes, I began to wonder how old he was supposed to be and why he was lodging with the older man, Matt. This was never explained, though it was not a gay relationship. In fact Matt molly-coddled Ben, like a doting mother!

The most far-fetched part, for me, was when a helicopter blasted a hole deep inside a volcano, big enough for the helicopter to fly right inside! Like I said, suspend belief.
I also became weary of the constant use of similes - "he jumped as high as ..... when he ......." etc. especially as I didn't understand some of the American references. Also a woman called Mai was mentioned several times, but never properly explained. I suppose you are meant to buy the next book to find out more.
There was plenty of action, fighting, bloodshed and the body count was high. All in all, an o.k. read, but I wouldn't rave about it.
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on 19 November 2013
OK you've been told before but you must read these in order. With that out the way, I've just gone through a little over a week reading the Odin cycle - all four books. Not because they are lightweight but because they drag you from one page to the next in a relentless charge full of larger than life villains being fought by all too human heroes.

The pace is such as to make you skate over any holes in the plot, the mythology behind the story is valid enough and the suppositions that turn the myth into a nightmare are also easy enough to swallow. There is little to jar you off the rails into incredulity, in short. So imagine Indiana Jones as an emotionally fragile ex-SAS exceeder with a disparate ragtag group fighting seemingly endless hordes of evil minions in a quest to save the world. You pretty much have it.

It's on sale here for less than a quid. What else can you get for that these days? A bar of chocolate? If you're ready to risk a pound in return for a chance of missed sleep as you are dragged along in the wake of Matt Drake and his friends, shoot for it. I think it's the best 99p you will ever spend!
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on 14 October 2017
Different from the previous books on crime I have been reading. I was unsure to start with. Soon I was hooked. A great story. Full of action. Tension. Gasps of disbelief. That's not possible! Hey this is fiction and a jolly good read it is. Now reading the next Matt Drake book. Recommended
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on 3 June 2014
This book was recommended to me and I wasn't sure if I'd like it so put off reading it for some time. What a mistake that was. This book is a well written, non-stop, action-packed thrill ride, which takes you across the World on a fabulous adventure. Matt Drake is a great lead character, he isn't polished and perfect, he has faults and that is what makes him likeable. I am looking forward to reading the other books in this series.
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on 1 June 2016
Non stop all action adventure thriller that leaves you breathless. The storyline evolves around a megalomaniac ( maybe two ) intent on finding the tomb of Odin and creating worldwide chaos. The good guys including Matt Drake and friends have other ideas.
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on 5 March 2013
This review will cover all four of the first series of Matt Drake books as they are continuous.
Had these stories had a moderate grounding in reallity I would have given them 5 stars.
Think of Indiana Jones, Jack Reacher and the SAS encountering Morriarty, Adolph Hittler and Genghis Khan and you're there.
This author does not waste any space on pages and pages of narative on the family history of any of the characters. they just drift together with a common cause to fight the bad guys, which they do to tremendous effect. There are more bodies per page in these books than in a full series of Midsummer Murders.
I would not call these books literature, but if you want an enjoyable read and are prepared to suspend your beliefs in ancient history, world governments, and the existence of Gods then these books are for you
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on 1 July 2012
Razor sharp plotting, compelling prose and a fusion of myth, suspense and fact make this one utterly unputdownable.

This isn't a 'literary masterpiece' as far as eloquence of the writing is concerned. The author has pruned back all unnecessary faff to cut to the core of the story. What you get here isn't hemmingway, but more akin to the fast food of the action adventure genre. Bones of Odin is tense, emotionally charged and follows a well worn 'Lets find the treasure' plot but with intricate twists that will keep you guessing.

What keeps this from being a 5 is that it isn't grounded enough. It's clearly a Lara Croft/ Indiana Jones level of escapism, designed for the reader to enjoy the story rather than the minuatae of the details. The plot stretches reality, but this is purely artistic licence.

A firm 4 from me.
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on 17 November 2013
I found the story line very interesting, but for me, it read like one of the early video games - it basically rolls from one gun battle to another, with countless expendable mercenaries as cannon fodder for the super heroes that drop kick and karate chop (when they aren't firing AK47's) their way from one country to another. If that dates me, then you'll know what I'm talking about. The female assassins are invincible and foul mouthed, and the male heroes aren't a lot better, although there is quite a good rapport between Matt Drake and his young side-kick. I found myself skipping whole pages of repetitive battles, so not the best read. I did like the big Swede though. On a positive note, respect for the huge amount of research that went into the premise of the whole thing.
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