Currently unavailable.
We don't know when or if this item will be back in stock.
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more

The making of the English landscape (The making of the English landscape)

4.7 out of 5 stars 27 customer reviews

See all 33 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price
New from Used from
Kindle Edition
"Please retry"

Man Booker International Prize Shortlist 2017
Take a look at our selection of Man Booker International Prize 2017 shortlisted books. Learn more
Currently unavailable. We don't know when or if this item will be back in stock.
click to open popover

Enter your mobile number or email address below and we'll send you a link to download the free Kindle App. Then you can start reading Kindle books on your smartphone, tablet, or computer - no Kindle device required.

  • Apple
  • Android
  • Windows Phone

To get the free app, enter your mobile phone number.



Product details

  • Unknown Binding: 240 pages
  • Publisher: Hodder and Stoughton (1963)
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B0007J8UZ6
  • Average Customer Review: 4.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (27 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Bestsellers Rank: 9,854,301 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)
  • If you are a seller for this product, would you like to suggest updates through seller support?

Customer Reviews

4.7 out of 5 stars
Share your thoughts with other customers

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Paperback
For me, reading the Pelican edition in 1970 sparked a lifelong interest in the history, meaning and aesthetic of the landscape. Yes, it is 'parochial' in some ways - but if you're studying English local history the detail of a Parish (or a farm, or a field) is an appropriate unit of study. Yes. it has more to say about some places than others, but that's because it is based on painstaking personal observation and research. The magic of this little book is that by focussing on detail it gives a glimpse of the incredibly complex history of the use of the land and the relationship between our everyday surroundings and our history.

My only criticism is that in the final chapter Hoskins descends into some rather despondent criticism of change during his lifetime. Though many might agree about the insensitivity of post-war 'development', it's a shame that he couldn't see this to some extent in historical perspective, comparing it perhaps with the 'vandalism' of earlier townscapes by Georgian then Victorian developers. Not everything that happened to the landscape in the 20th Century was bad, though one can understand the concern of a historian that too much of the record was being lost, too quickly.

Buy this book, read it carefully and quietly and you might see your surroundings with new eyes. But to see the landscape as Hoskins saw it, you'll have to get out of the car and walk, stop, take your time, look, look again and be curious about what you see.
Comment 45 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback
Numerous pictures and the chronological layout aid the clarity of description that the author brings to a topic that he clearly loves. I found it fascinating and illuminating, explaining the everyday countryside. The parochial nature of the book mentioned in the previous review was not evident to myself, but I am sure that you should buy this book and provide a third opinion!
Comment 36 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback
William George Hoskins (1908-1992) was a pioneering figure in the field of English local history, and in 1965 was appointed as the first ever university professor in that discipline (at the University of Leicester). This book, first published in 1955, has become something of a classic of its kind.

I bought it in the 1970s Pelican edition when I came across it recently in a second-hand bookshop, largely for the purposes of comparison with Oliver Rackham's more recent work "The History of the Countryside". The two works cover slightly different ground. Hoskins (as his title indicates) limits himself to England, and does not touch on Wales, Scotland or Ireland; Rackham covers the whole of the British Isles, although in practice he deals with England in greater detail than the other three countries. Rackham (as his title indicates) confines himself to the countryside, whereas Hoskins also covers industrial and urban landscapes, and even in rural areas deals with villages and the built environment as well as woods and farmland. Their methodologies are also different. Rackham devotes a chapter to each different type of rural habitat- woodland, fields, heathland, moorland, marshes, etc, whereas Hoskins' book is written in chronological order from prehistoric times to the twentieth century.

A key moment for Professor Hoskins was what he calls the "English Settlement"- the coming of the Anglo-Saxon invaders in the fifth century AD, after the withdrawal of the Roman legions. Few features of the modern English landscape can, in his view, be attributed to the Roman or pre-Roman period. Each succeeding age, however, has left a mark which still survives.
Read more ›
Comment 52 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback
This was a pioneering study when it was first published in 1955. It dispelled earlier thoughts that the english landscape was almost entirely a creation of 18th century land use. Hoskins' book is a very readable one, mixing fine detail with a hand book like approach. The majority of field work was done by Hoskins on the ground, which allows for a unique insight into the historical make up of the countryside. The reader must, however, bear in mind that Hoskins account is not one stemming from a detatched ,scientific observer, but a human beeing that is passionate about certain facets of the countryside. For instance, it is clear that Hoskins does not have a love of anything in the modern era. Further more, the Victorian era is looked down upon. Care should be taken when considering the spatial distributions of some of the features he mentions, there is a tendancy for some areas of England to be more heavily studied than others, for instance his home county of Devon, and the area around Leicester where he worked for many years. All in all, the book is a reletively thourough account of the historical fabric of the English landscape in a very readable format.
Comment 31 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
A foundation text for anyone interested in the history of landscape or who works in the landed sector - Oliver Rackham, Simon Schama and many others were influenced by Hoskin's book that draws on the skills of an academic historian but is beautifully written.

I bought it in the Kindle version, which makes it impossible to appreciate the book properly as you cannot browse it. Buy the paper version.
Comment 3 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse

Most Recent Customer Reviews