Currently unavailable.
We don't know when or if this item will be back in stock.

Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Available to Download Now
Buy the MP3 album for £6.99

kiss me, kiss me, kiss me LP

4.6 out of 5 stars 45 customer reviews

See all 25 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Listen Now with Amazon Music
Kiss Me Kiss Me Kiss Me
"Please retry"
Amazon Music Unlimited
Amazon Price
New from Used from
Audio Cassette
"Please retry"
£10.00
Currently unavailable.
We don't know when or if this item will be back in stock.
Customers also viewed these available items
Currently unavailable. We don't know when or if this item will be back in stock.

Amazon's The Cure Store


What other items do customers buy after viewing this item?


Product details

  • Vinyl
  • Label: ELEKTRA
  • ASIN: B004E93KR8
  • Other Editions: Audio CD  |  Audio Cassette  |  Vinyl  |  MP3 Download
  • Average Customer Review: 4.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (45 customer reviews)
  • If you are a seller for this product, would you like to suggest updates through seller support?

Customer Reviews

4.6 out of 5 stars
Share your thoughts with other customers

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
I bought this after losing my original many years ago. I have to admit I was concerned that the passage of so many years and rose coloured tinted memories, that the tracks would not hold the same captivation as previously. I was wrong..... this album is better the second time round! Each track is well crafted and easily could be viewed as stand alone singles (as in "Staring At The Sea"), but the depth a variety of the styles piques and recedes, and provides an all-round spine tingling, hair standing, eye-liner rubbing experience. To (what feels like) an old Goth - this was a very welcome excursion back to my formative years!
Comment 2 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Vinyl Verified Purchase
Brilliant gift for my grandmother who is a massive fan of the cure! Excellent condition too!
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
This album caused quite a stir within the music media when it was released (1987). Just two years earlier The Cure had finally broken through as a major commercial act, following six years of trying their best not to, and the prospect of a double album (as was the form it's original vinyl release took) from these unexpected megastars got more than a few people quite excited.
All their expectations were fulfilled, the album containing 4 bona fide hit singles and 13 other classics, many of which could have been suitable choices for singles.
The album kicks off with The Kiss, a heavy wah-wah driven track - the full 6:17 of wild guitar (with few repeating phrases) being performed in one take by vocalist Robert Smith rather than guitarist Porl Thompson, which surprised many given Porl's reputation as the "solo" guitarist out of what was a 2-guitar line up (Smith and Thompson). After this, we move into Catch, a mediterranean style piece of pop which is acknowledged by most Cure fans as being one of their greatest singles.
The opening two tracks set the pace for the rest of the album really. The 17 songs pretty much go from rock/sort-of psychedelic to pop back to rock/sort-of psychedelic back to pop, and so on throughout the album.
This is a concept that the band employed years later for Wild Mood Swings (1996), however on that particular album it doesn't really work simply because most of the songs just aren't strong enough to carry it off.
On Kiss Me Kiss Me Kiss Me it works brilliantly though.
Like I said, most of the songs could have been singles, and of the songs that couldn't (i.e. the rockier or sort-of psychedelic stuff) are all absolute classics as well, so there aren't any problems with mixing and matching styles.
Read more ›
Comment 14 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
By 1987 The Cure were in their stride, combining mainstream success with critic success, thanks mainly to the 36 minute "Head on The Door" album.

"Kiss Me (x3)", an 18 song extravaganza (well over an hour in length) is an amazing collection of dark and dour, but with those killer Cure hooks.

The singles were firm and bubbly ("Just Like Heaven" may just be the greatest Cure single of all time), but digging futher tracks like "Torture" and "One More Time" are just so excellent it makes the hairs on your body stand up.

The second disc is full of the compulsory demos and "live bootleg" tracks cuz most of the other material has found it's way out on various boxsets over the years. It's still amazing to hear the germination of the final product though.

This album is highly recommended!
Comment 17 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
1985's 'The Head on the Door' & the following year's 'Standing on a Beach/Staring at the Sea'-compilation began to put The Cure on the path to stadium appeal. The Smith-Tolhurst-Gallup-Thompson-Williams line-up one of the key versions of The Cure (even if Tolhurst was a poor keyboard player!) featuring four prinicpal members who would be in the band up to the best-selling 'Wish' in 1992 (following which Thompson & Williams would bow out - the former has since rejoined, which is as well as he's the best guitarist the band ever had!). Following a headlining slot at Glastonbury and the 'Cure in Orange' concert, the band relocated to the South of France to record this double album. I'm sure Smith was picturing it as The Cure's 'Electric Ladyland' or 'White Album', while Thompson nodded to 'Physical Graffiti.' Essentially 'Kiss Me Kiss Me Kiss Me', released in Spring 1987, was an expanded take on the eclectic directions of 'The Head on the Door', an album that seemed to sum up the different ways Smith went...

As with many double albums, it suffers by having some so-so material - though fans of box-set 'Join the Dots' will note some fine songs were banished to b-sides, e.g. 'Chain of Flowers', 'A Japanese Dream.' The album would be a lot sharper without 'Icing Sugar', the 'Night Like This'-retread 'All I Want', the obvious b-side 'Hey You!!!' (which wasn't on the prior cd version), or the irritating initial single 'Why Can't I Be You???' Smith had become more democratic with the songwriting, letting other members contribute whereas Cure albums from 'Seventeen Seconds' on had been very much his vision.
Read more ›
1 Comment 9 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse


Look for similar items by category