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Oslo, August 31st 2011

4.3 out of 5 stars (13) IMDb 7.7/10

Recovering drug addict Anders has almost completed his rehabilitation programme. As part of his treatment he's given a day's leave from the countryside rehab centre to attend a job interview in his native Oslo.

Starring:
Anders Danielsen Lie, Malin Crépin
Runtime:
1 hour, 30 minutes

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Product Details

Genres Drama
Director Joachim Trier
Starring Anders Danielsen Lie, Malin Crépin
Supporting actors Aksel Thanke, Hans Olav Brenner, Ingrid Olava, Øystein Røger, Tone Beate Mostraum, Kjærsti Odden Skjeldal, Petter Width Kristiansen, Emil Lund, Johanne Kjellevik Ledang, Renate Reinsve, Andreas Braaten, Anders Borchgrevink, Bettina Fleischer, Iselin Steiro
Studio Soda Pictures
BBFC rating Suitable for 15 years and over
Purchase rights Stream instantly Details
Format Amazon Video (streaming online video)

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Customer Reviews

4.3 out of 5 stars
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Top Customer Reviews

Format: DVD
As the late Amy Winehouse discovered, offers of a visit to rehab often get received with a `no, no, no'. Well in this case Anders played by Anders Danielson-Lie, is in rehab, whilst he is successfully completing the course it is obvious that he is just going through the motions and sobriety, which can be depressing at the best of times, has left him feeling worthless. So he fills his pocket with stones and jumps in a lake - which sort of fails miserably.

After drying off he is given a pass to go to Oslo for a job interview and a day out, so off he goes. The problem is that he comes from Oslo and all his old `friends' are still there. They have moved on with their lives whereas he has been in a downward spiral of drug abuse for years. He doesn't even have good times to show as most of it was an intoxicated blur. The interview goes badly and Anders slowly goes back to what he knows will give him solace.

This is not the first film to say drugs are bad, it is not the first to deal with suicidal tendencies or a mid life crisis, but it is different all the same. Anders has a series of conversations with the old friends he meets and what at first seems to be the perfect marriage is soon revealed to be a marriage of endured compromise. Jobs that could appear glamorous are merely a means to an end. The revelation that the whole world is rubbish is probably not what Anders wants. But it is what he deserves, because this is all about life choices. He admits to being a spoilt brat and there are references to his caring parents throughout, especially as to how much he has cost them.

He is very hard to like as a person, but it is a credit to director Joachim Trier that he still manages to engage us with someone who is a selfish drug user and dealer.
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Format: DVD
There's a scene in a cafe where the lead character sits and listens and watches all of the people around him, and they talk about their desires and their wants, what they hope to achieve, and their grievances in love and work. And an earlier scene where the lead meets up with an old friend who complains that his child has a rash and he doesn't have enough sex with his wife, and their only time of closeness is playing a violent video game. Everyone has their little problems, and everyone talks about them. The lead has one main problem, which he rarely talks about - he's looking for a reason to live, while making unnoticed steps towards his end. It's also a film bubbling with missed connections, lost opportunities, a job interview that could have gone well had he not bailed in self hatred, a sister who doesn't want to see him, a girl he has a moment with but he's waiting for someone else, a lost kiss, people he passes on the street, all of them are weighted with possibilities for a different film. It's also very beautiful.
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Format: DVD Verified Purchase
Norwegian screenwriter and director Joachim Trier`s second feature film premiered in the Un Certain Regard section at the 64th Cannes International Film Festival in 2011, was screened in the Vanguard section at the 36th Toronto International Film Festival in 2011, was shot on location in Oslo, Norway and is a loose adaptation of French writer Pierre Drieu La Rochelle`s novel “Le feu follet” from 1931 which French screenwriter, producer and director Louis Malle (1932-1995) honoured with his masterful adaptation “The Fire Within” (1963). It tells the story about a recovering drug addict in his thirties named Anders who has been living at an unlocked residential treatment center for a long time. It`s summer and Anders is on his way to Oslo, Norway where a job interview awaits him, but first and foremost he has to locate his former girlfriend named Iselin and visit some of his old friends.

Norwegian filmmaker Joachim Trier`s stylistic, acute and to a certain extent lyrical directing, captures both the spirit of Oslo and the spirit of the main character in this melancholic though efficiently humorous drama which similar to the director`s feature film debut “Reprise” (2006) has Norwegian actor Anders Danielsen Lie in one of the leading roles, was shot on some of the same locations, was co-written by Norwegian screenwriter Eskil Vogt, photographed by Norwegian cinematographer Jacob Ihre and is a homage to the capital city of Norway. This dense fictional tale is emphasized by its very realistic urban milieu depictions, a fine acting performance by Anders Danielsen Lie where he conveys more with his facial expressions than with his words and some noticeable supporting acting performances by amongst others Hans Olav Brenner as the protagonist`s close friend named Thomas.
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This movie is something that people can relate too and with it's sensitivity it may even help some people. The thing that I didn't like in the film is the one scene that is very badly edited. The guy suddenly appears closer to the person he's talking too and has the ability to talk without moving his lips. This scene only last a minute or two and most people would not even notice or think twice about it. However for me knowing how easy film editing is nowadays I was very disappointed. An error like this is only caused by the editor being slack. Video editing has never been easier and there no excuse for this to happen in 2013.

I am a bit of a 'Norway fan' I love the country and probably the world's biggest Donkeyboy fan - A massive Norwegian pop band. I know the country is capable of producing outstanding works in art, music and film which makes this particular movie even more disappointing because of the poor production values in that *one scene*. I don't understand why it wasn't picked up on and corrected before the movie went into Norway's cinemas, it would of only taken about 10 mins to correct if not less.
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