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The Look of Love 2013

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From director Michael Winterbottom comes the sexy, funny and outrageously true story of Paul Raymond, the controversial entrepreneur and property baron who established the Raymond Revue Bar in the 50’s and went on to become Britain’s richest man by the early 90’s.

Starring:
Jennifer Ellis, Steve Coogan
Runtime:
1 hour, 40 minutes

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Product Details

Genres Drama, Comedy, Documentary
Director Michael Winterbottom
Starring Jennifer Ellis, Steve Coogan
Supporting actors Nick Hopper, Paul Popplewell, Imogen Poots, Anna Friel, Jim Clubb, Sarah Lou, Emma Williamson, Stephen Fry, Raymond Waring, Kieran O'Brien, Shirley Henderson, Frankie Thomson, Jennifer Gardiner, David Walliams, Betsy Rose, Katie Swatton, Tabitha Taboo, Gemma Nicholas
Studio StudioCanal
BBFC rating Suitable for 18 years and over
Purchase rights Stream instantly Details
Format Amazon Video (streaming online video)

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: DVD Verified Purchase
`The Look of Love' tells the story of the first `porn baron' of London, Paul Raymond - arguable the richest man in England to ever make his money in such an industry.

The first thing you need to know is that the casting of Steve Coogan is a sheer masterpiece. He's every bit believable as the sleazy, low-life kid from Liverpool who made his fortune in London. It's his film and he carries it well. There are a few famous faces popping up here and there and they all play their parts well, too. However, I thought the best co-star was (The Thick of It-famed) Chris Addison, playing yet another slimebag to perfection.

If you're even vaguely offended by (female) nudity, or drug usage, then you probably shouldn't watch this. Both vices are frequently portrayed from the opening act to the end.

Ultimately, the film charts the highs and the lows of Paul Raymond's career, although, if you investigate the man himself, you may feel that Coogan's portrayal of him and his industry is quite kindly. Sex, drugs and pornography are shown as the norm, rarely damaging anyone's life (other than the protagonist's). But that could be down to the film's running time being quite a condensed ninety minutes. Therefore, we're probably left to put two and two together to realise that such vices can sometimes carry far darker consequences.

If you're expecting `Alan Partridge' Coogan then you may be disappointed. The Look of Love is not that funny, but then it's not really meant to be. It's a (generous) life story of a very interesting may who was certainly not a saint. If you're a fan of Coogan, or just curious to know what goes on behind those alluring neon lights in Soho then give this one a go.
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Format: Blu-ray Verified Purchase
Very enjoyable look at life before nudity and porn was only a click away. I loved Coogan's performance as Paul Raymond and found it really convincing - (a role he's always wanted to play according to the Blu-ray interviews.) Imogen Poots is outstanding as Debbie, the favourite daughter of Raymond - combining a degree of vulnerability and insecurity with a touching devotion to her 'Pa.' Favourite scene is where she drags her depressed dad out of bed for some serious 'dad dancing' in the heart of their beloved Soho. A good soundtrack, if a little predictable. Strong supporting roles from Anna Friel and Tamsin Egerton, plus a sense of witty but natural improvisation around many of the key scenes, makes for a sentimental wander through central London.
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Format: DVD Verified Purchase
I really enjoyed this, but I found it was the cast surrounding Steve Coogan I enjoyed more than the man himself. At times, Paul Raymond slipped into Tony Wilson (24 Hour Party People), and at times both men have slipped into Partridge (oo-er). I find Coogan cannot portray emotion very well and is at his best when he is being condescending and irritating.

But on saying that, The Look of Love is a good piece of social history, even if at times the female nudity does get a little too much to bear (I'm sure that would be different for male viewers). Imogen Poots probably gives the standout performance as Raymond's spoilt, but emotionally confused daughter Debbie, who ends up a drug addict. In contrast, is a rather sad scene where Raymond's illegitimate first son, Derry joins him for dinner and is promptly dismissed afterwards.

I feel the film had a bit of an identity crisis, not knowing if it was a comedy or a drama. If it was a comedy, Coogan was a good choice. If it was drama, I think they could have cast someone with a bit more range. But on saying that, it held my attention and I was curious on googling `Fiona Richmond' to find that Tamsin Egerton, who plays her, is actually better looking, despite Richmond being a major sex symbol of the time.
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Format: DVD Verified Purchase
This semi comedic film sets about telling the story of one of the most colourful characters of the last century, well in England anyway. That was Paul Raymond, played by the nearly always, brilliant Steve Coogan. We start with the untimely death of his much loved daughter. He then reflects back on his life.

This is done by the film going back to the beginning of his sex empire and reverts to black and white which was a a good way to age the footage and we see how his philandering ways cost him his first marriage. We have him being a theatre impresario and the `art' of ladies with scant clothes on being his stock in trade. Raymond seems to like quoting Oscar Wilde which is also a nice touch. Whilst this is a comedy it is the script and the one liners that do most of the laughs. The actual on screen action is as much drama as anything else.

There is a host of supporting stars too with Chris Addison playing a very beardy `Men's Only' publisher. Anna Friel as Jean Raymond, Matt Lucas as Divine, David Walliams as a pervy vicar and even Stephen Fry putting in a very short appearance as a barrister. Coogan's make up is excellent and he ages really well throughout the 101 minutes of screen time. The soundtrack is great too with the likes of Roxy Music, T-Rex and even Cilla Black all getting an airing. There is a fair deal of mild nudity and a lot of `strong' words which are all in context and not gratuitous - unlike the nude ladies that is.

It has been criticised for lack of character development, but I think that was half the problem in that Raymond did not have to develop and so got round to it too late, also it is quite difficult to do that with such a long cast list. The main question should be is it any good?
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