Shop now Shop now Shop now  Up to 70% Off Fashion  Shop all Amazon Fashion Cloud Drive Photos Shop now Learn More Shop now Shop now Shop Fire Shop Kindle Shop now Shop now

Green Street Hooligans 2005

Elijah Wood stars as an expelled Harvard student who moves to London and finds himself embraced and disturbed by the dominant violence of English soccer culture.

Starring:
Elijah Wood, Charlie Hunnam
Runtime:
1 hour, 44 minutes

Available to watch on supported devices.

Mr. Robot Season 2: New episode available every Thursday

Watch now.

Buy Movie SD £6.99
By placing your order, you agree to our Terms of Use. Sold by Amazon Video.

Product Details

Genres Drama, Sport
Director Lexi Alexander
Starring Elijah Wood, Charlie Hunnam
Supporting actors Claire Forlani, Marc Warren, Leo Gregory, Geoff Bell, Kieran Bew, Henry Goodman, Christopher Hehir, Terence Jay, Ross McCall, Francis Pope, Rafe Spall, David Alexander, Oliver Allison, James Allison, Joel Beckett, Andrew Blair, David Carr, Brendan Charleson
Studio Universal Pictures
BBFC rating Suitable for 18 years and over
Purchase rights Stream instantly Details
Format Amazon Video (streaming online video)

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: DVD
I think a lot of people are missing the point with this film. For me, it was not so much about football violence as about the morals behind it. The main character, Elijah Wood, does not join the Green Street Elite because he enjoys the hooliganism - he joins because he finds a loyalty with them that he never found back home in America (as is highlighted by the opening scene). The fact that the film also makes you care about people you would normally despise (or should despise) shows how effecive it is at portraying the tragedy of such addiction to violence.

Yes, you can find faults with the film - the GSE leader's cockney accent is very dodgy, some scenes verge on the unbelievable. But as for the leader's walk - take a look around and you'll see that it's the way a lot of people walk when they are trying to look like more than they actually are. And Elijah Wood is not miscast - the fact that he does not look like a football hooligan is exactly the point.

The violence in this film is indeed quite graphic, but that doesn't make it glorified - rather it shows how destructive it can be, not just to the individual but to their families too.

The ending - unlike so many films - provides a satisfying conclusion that sums up the entire film. As Elijah says, it's not about brutal, meaningless violence but about learning 'when to stand up for yourself, and when to walk away.' The point of all the brutality in the film becomes clear as Elijah explains what he learnt from the Green Street Elite's excessive use of violence: that there is an alternative, which can be just as effective.

If you really do want a film about football hooliganism, then this may not be for you - try Football Factory. But as a film in itself, this is great.
1 Comment 26 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: DVD
I think a lot of people are missing the point with this film. For me, it was not so much about football violence as about the morals behind it. The main character, Elijah Wood, does not join the Green Street Elite because he enjoys the hooliganism - he joins because he finds a loyalty with them that he never found back home in America (as is highlighted by the opening scene). The fact that the film also makes you care about people you would normally despise (or should despise) shows how effecive it is at portraying the tragedy of such addiction to violence.

Yes, you can find faults with the film - the GSE leader's cockney accent is very dodgy, some scenes verge on the unbelievable. But as for the leader's walk - take a look around and you'll see that it's the way a lot of people walk when they are trying to look like more than they actually are. And Elijah Wood is not miscast - the fact that he does not look like a football hooligan is exactly the point.

The violence in this film is indeed quite graphic, but that doesn't make it glorified - rather it shows how destructive it can be, not just to the individual but to their families too.

The ending - unlike so many films - provides a satisfying conclusion that sums up the entire film. As Elijah says, it's not about brutal, meaningless violence but about learning 'when to stand up for yourself, and when to walk away.' The point of all the brutality in the film becomes clear as Elijah explains what he learnt from the Green Street Elite's excessive use of violence: that there is an alternative, which can be just as effective.

If you really do want a film about football hooliganism, then this may not be for you - try Football Factory. But as a film in itself, this is great.
Comment 5 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: DVD
When films are this bad, your humble reviewer is in a quandary:
Go full hit and expound manifold reasons why said work stinks like a dead whale, or curtly dismiss it, therefore saving words, phrases and ideas for reviews which better merit the process of their conception.

It really doesn't take much perception or insight to be able to judge 'Green Street' as the worst kind of film that gets made today. An idiotic mish-mash of social commentary and action thriller; and a glaring example of Hollywood's deep obsession/understanding of the darker side of all things culturally British.

Ie: Find a subject that they think is cinematic/appealing to people's baser principles, go to 'authentic' locations, hire 'local' actors, and finally, plonk a well-known American in the lead so, in theory, you have something which appeals to everyone.

But, and it's a big but, for this to work you need a few things in your favour:
You need a decent script; you need the director to at least be alive, and you need the cast to be on top of their game.
'Green Street' doesn't have any of these. In spades.

Some proof? I HATE lists, but they're all that 'GS' deserves..
1) The script. It would take too long to convey how bad it is, so some examples:
If you're a footie thug, one of your major essentials on a match-day is avoiding the police. Drunkenly screaming your heads off down the tube will get you surrounded in seconds.
On occasion, the film looks like an ad for Lacoste trainers. Most hooligans don't wear whites because it shows blood up too easily if the cops are looking for you later. Wow, research? Duh.
There's no football 'lad' IN THE WORLD, who on seeing his brother's new baby, will start singing "I'm West Ham til I die!!!
Read more ›
Comment 14 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse