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Great Expectations 1946

David Lean's adaptation of Charles Dickens' classic tale of orphan boy, Pip, who aspires to be a gentleman, won Oscars for Best Art Direction and Cinematography and was nominated for Best Director, Best Picture and Best Writing.

Starring:
John Mills, Alec Guinness
Runtime:
1 hour, 53 minutes

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Product Details

Genres Drama, Romance
Director David Lean
Starring John Mills, Alec Guinness
Supporting actors Jean Simmons, Bernard Miles, Valerie Hobson, Francis Sullivan, Finlay Currie, Freda Jackson, Hay Petrie, Torin Thatcher, Martita Hunt, Ivor Barnard, O. B. Clarence, George Gabby Hayes, Anthony Wager
Studio ITV
BBFC rating Parental Guidance
Purchase rights Stream instantly Details
Format Amazon Video (streaming online video)

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: DVD
From the wonderfully eerie opening scenes on the Essex marshes and Finlay Currie's menacing appearance in a foggy graveyard, you can tell straight away this is a winner. As the story of this "gentleman of great expectations" unfolds, you are treated to one of cinema's classics. David Lean's moody direction keeps you gripped throughout, but it's the acting that really makes the movie: John Mills and Alec Guiness both turn in great performances, and the incidental characters such as Francis L Sullivan's bluff Jaggers and the bumbling but sweet Joe Gargery supplied by Bernard Miles simply steal the show. There have been at least ten versions of this film made. If you only watch one, make it this one: It's a cracker!
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Format: DVD
Out of all the film adaptations of 'Great Expectations', this is by far the best. It captures the warm humour of each charcter, brilliantly and because the film is quite old, the Victorian England set would more or less exactly how it should be, as parts of London in 1946 would still be like that.
One day when pip is out in the Graveyard putting flowers on his parents grave, he comes across an escaped convict whom he takes food to. Many years later while doing his apprentiship as a blacksmith, he is given great wealth and property by an unknown benifactor. Pip has a few ideas of who it could be, but the truth is afr from what he imagined.
In my opinion this is probably one of Charles Dicken's best novels, and even probably one of the best novels ever written. As you will know, reading a Dickens novel is not the easiest of books to read, and this excelent adaptation, allows you to watch it instaed. I do recommend though, that you read the book first as it will assist your understanding of the film, even though the film is very clear as to what is happening.
The acting is simply perfect, especially from young Pip and young Estella who almost seem to 'be' Pip and Estela who have jumped off the pages and come to life. This is what makes a good adaptation.
If you have read the book, then this is a must-see, and if you haven't, then this is still a must see, simply because it is a great film. Beware though, it is in black and white, but this shouldn't matter.
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Format: VHS Tape
This versions of Dicken's classic novel "great expectations" is a fantastic adaptation of the book. It follows the book very well and it's the best version i have seen so far out of all 3 versions.
All the actors/actresses are fantastic and i thoroughly enjoyed watching it at school so i bought it. I have been watching it ever since.
The film only misses out a few characters, such as Orlick, who worked for Joe and there are only 1 or two other characters missed out.
So i suggest you buy it, it may be in black and white but it adds to the effect and makes it most enjoyable.
The actor who plays the convict at the beginning
is fantstic when he approaches Pip in the graveyard .
So my advise to you is to buy this.
I am only 15 and have thouroughly enjoyed it.
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Format: DVD
Having seen, and been disappointed in, many book-to-film adaptations, this particular version surprised me. It is very true to the book, and apart from Orlick and the Pockets, leaves no major character's story out. The dialogue is mostly lifted straight from Dicken's text, and yet still works quite well on film. The settings are very realistic, Satis House is very impressive and almost exactly as I imagined it to be. If I remember correctly, the ending of the film is the same as the original ending that Dicken's wrote - this helps to tie the film up and works better than the published ending.

My only criticisms would be that John Mills, although a very fine actor, is a poor 'older Pip' for the simple reason that he looks far too old. He was in fact 38 when he made the film by my reckoning... and is not a very believable 20 year old Pip in my opinion. The young Pip (Anthony Wager) and young Estella (Jean Simmons) on the other hand are exactly how I imagined them to be. By the end of the film, it feels like too much has happened in too short a time, and it is quite hard to keep track of everything that has gone on - this is only to be expected considering the length and complexity of the novel, and I for one appreciate that it did not cut any sub-plots out despite the possibility of confusion.

I recommend that you definitely read it first, only then will you be able to appreciate the film fully.

GVW
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Format: DVD
There are some films, such as "Casablanca," that should never be remade. David Lean's "Great Expectations" is one of them.

The cast--headed by John Mills as the grown-up Pip, and which includes the rotund Francis L. Sullivan as the lawyer Jagger (whose clients are hanged as a matter of course), Finlay Curry as the convict Magwitch, and Alec Guinness as Herbert Pocket--is pitch-perfect (although I always thought that Valerie Hobson was a bit of a disappointment after the brittle hauteur of Jean Simmons).

This film has everything: humor, suspense, and a lack of the sentimentality that seems to have crept into Dickensian films of late.

Lean, who was to become famous for his sweeping desolate landscapes of "Lawrence of Arabia" and "Dr. Zhivago," captures the essence of the lonely English fog-bound marshes with swirling swathes of grey in this glorious black and white film. The image of young Estella (a bewitching Jean Simmons) leading young Pip by candlelight up the darkened staircase into the cobweb-enshrouded inner sanctum of the demented Miss Havisham (the incomparable Martita Hunt) is unforgettable, as is the sight of the jilted bride's rat-infested wedding cake. Without computer-generated effects or even color, David Lean has created a cinematic masterpiece.
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