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The Winslow Boy 1999

4.4 out of 5 stars (56) IMDb 7.4/10

The story of the very public fight to clear the name of the Winslow family's son. Based on the play by Terrence Rattigan.

Starring:
Matthew Pidgeon, Rebecca Pidgeon
Runtime:
1 hour, 40 minutes

Available to watch on supported devices.

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Product Details

Genres Drama, Romance
Director David Mamet
Starring Matthew Pidgeon, Rebecca Pidgeon
Supporting actors Gemma Jones, Nigel Hawthorne, Lana Bilzerian, Sarah Flind, Aden Gillett, Guy Edwards, Colin Stinton, Eve Bland, Sara Stewart, Perry Fenwick, Alan Polonsky, Jeremy Northam, Neil North, Chris Porter, Jim Dunk, Duncan Gould, Ian Soundy, John Grayson
Studio Sony Pictures International
BBFC rating Universal, suitable for all
Purchase rights Stream instantly Details
Format Amazon Video (streaming online video)

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: DVD
The Winslow Boy is a first-class David Mamet film of indirection, understatement and cool emotion. A young cadet at the Royal Naval Academy has been expelled for stealing a five-shilling postal order from another cadet. He swears to his father that he didn't do it and his father believes him. At that point Arthur Winslow (Nigel Hawthorne) becomes determined to prove his son innocent. He is rebuffed by the Admiralty because, as part of the Queen's government, the Admiralty can do no wrong and cannot be sued. He engages a famous solicitor, Sir Robert Morton (Jeremy Northam), who agrees to take the brief. Morton eventually succeeds in bringing the case before the House of Commons on a petition of right, where even the lowest of the Queen's subjects can have the opportunity "to have right be done." All this takes years. The Winslow family suffers ridicule and financial distress. Arthur Winslow's daughter, Catherine (Rebecca Pidgeon), a prickly and intelligent suffragette, sees her opportunity for an advantageous marriage evaporate. His son is forced to leave Oxford and take a banking job. His wife sees so much of the security of the home vanish in the costs of the case. The case, based on a true happening, finally is won.

Mamet's screenplay is based on the Forties play by Terrence Rattigan. It's a solid piece of work that keeps the story moving and concentrates on the characters. The interplay among the characters is excellent, especially between Catherine Winslow and Sir Robert Morton. The dialogue may be on the surface exquisitely courteous, but underneath runs unexpected currents that are a lot of fun to witness. Northam's Morton is smart, secure, successful and not at all sympathetic to suffragettes.
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Format: DVD
It took me several years to get around to purchasing "The Winslow Boy". Although I was certain that I would like it--after all, Nigel Hawthorne was in it--I had no idea that I was in for an hour-and-a-half of such absorbing drama. In one of his last roles, Hawthorne brings a poignant combination of strength and tenderness to the role of the patriarch, whose determination to "let right be done" almost breaks apart the family that he is trying to preserve. His scenes with Gemma Jones--torn apart by her conflicting roles as loyal wife and loving mother--are especially moving. Because of the ensemble acting of the entire cast, the family dynamic is entirely believable.

The real surprise for me, however, was Jeremy Northam in the role of Sir Robert Morton, KC, MP. Although Northam's performances in films such as "Gosford Park" and "Enigma" have been enjoyable, his portrayal of the aristocratic barrister quietly sizzled with sensual undertones that would do a handsome brooding Jane Austen hero proud. I found myself waiting for him to come onstage, as it were; and wishing that I could hear his moving summation to the jury; and that I might be allowed to follow Sir Robert's romantic pursuit of Miss Winslow. The last lines of the film are simply tantalizing.

Much of this "wanting more of Morton" derives not only from Northam's portrayal, but also from playwright Terrance Rattigan's technique of having the action take place offstage. The technique, which dates back to Greek tragedy, contributes to the dramatic tension of "The Winslow Boy." The very device of having characters relate the events taking place elsewhere, however, will likely render the drama inaccessible to some viewers, who demand fast-paced visual action. But for those who savor a riveting drama of quality, "The Winslow Boy" will not disappoint.
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Format: DVD
This film is no different from any other David Mamet film. No car chases here! It feels like a stage play, where all the action comes from dialogue and you can almost feel the subdued passion between the characters. It's a wonderful period piece, but you feel like you're watching the intricacies of the acting profession, like you're watching an acting exercise. All the actors are brilliant, from the old "school" Nigel Hawthorne, to Mamet's wife Rebecca Pidgeon, as suffragette daughter Kate who drops like a ton of bricks for the always very sexy Jeremy Northam.
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Format: DVD Verified Purchase
In my opinion this is much better than previous attempts to put it on. Modern audiences may find it theatrical but it is of another time and of another people who took their affairs seriously and talked with grace and understanding; qualities in short supply lately. There is much to reflect on in the way they speak, something to learn from the clarity of the dialogue and much to admire in a strong play well acted and produced. It is worth the price to hear Nigel Hawthorne once more.
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Format: DVD
A funny, elegant and rip-roaring tale, which has a very prominent message for today, as it's writer Terrence Rattigan was also a modern man. His plays are always intelligent and in a class all of their own. Hugely funny with scathing wit and underlying romance makes this a film to captivate you all the way through. Try it out from your local library first, and when your hooked you'll have to get it for your collection!!!
Go on it's a winslow formula!
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By lawyeraau HALL OF FAMETOP 500 REVIEWER on 13 Feb. 2003
Format: DVD
All lovers of period pieces should enjoy this one. This remake, based upon the play by Terrence Rattigan, takes place in the early part of the twentieth century, before the advent of World War I. A thirteen year old Naval cadet is excused of stealing a postal order and subsequently expelled. He claims that he did not do it, despite seeming evidence to the contrary. His upstanding and prosperous family rally around him. After going to the Naval academy from which he was expelled and having their entreaties fall upon deaf ears, they decide to take the unprecedented step of suing the Crown.
The family retains the services of a well respected barrister, Sir Robert Morton, played with British reserve by the always wonderful Jeremy Northam, who agrees to represent the boy. The case becomes a cause celebre all over England, and Sir Morton's client becomes known as that Winslow boy, a notoriety that shakes the boy's very proper family to its core. While the case wends its way through the English legal system, tension between the boy's intelligent, bluestocking sister, gravely played by Rebecca Pidgeon, and his barrister bubbles to the surface.
The courtroom scenes do not dominate the drama, though they are interesting. The outcome of the lawsuit is, of course, predictable. Yet, it is of no consequence, since the movie is not really about the resolution of the case. The movie ends on a note of romantic hope, as it wittily augers what is surely to come.
Another version of this film, released in 1948, is just as good as this one. It is easy to make the comparison, since both films are nearly word for word the same. One is shot in black and white, the other in color. They are both, however, excellent.
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