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The Book Thief 2014

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Geoffrey Rush and Emily Watson star in this moving film based on the bestseller about a girl (Sophie Nélisse) who transforms the lives of those around her in World War II Germany.

Starring:
Emily Watson, Geoffrey Rush, Sophie Nélisse
Runtime:
2 hours, 10 minutes

Available to watch on supported devices.

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Product Details

Genres Military & War, Drama, Historical
Director Brian Percival
Starring Emily Watson, Geoffrey Rush, Sophie Nélisse
Studio Fox
BBFC rating Suitable for 12 years and over
Captions and subtitles English Details
Purchase rights Stream instantly Details
Format Amazon Video (streaming online video)

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: DVD
What I enjoyed most about the film was how death is introduced as a character. It's the voice of death which is used throughout the film to narrate much of what has happened in the past.

It's death who introduces Liesel, Sophie Nelisse, in the opening scenes and death who fills in her life story in the closing scenes. He's in and out throughout the film gently taking souls while passing on his own unique and inspiring message about all he has learnt about us, the human family. Very philosophical and really quite beautiful. His speech in the closing scenes was so uplifting I was almost moved to tears.

The story concentrates on the war in Germany and focuses upon the growth of the Nazi's and the impact that has on a small town in which Liesel is taken to live with 'adopted' parents. Liesel can't read much at first but develops a passion for books. A passion that will remain throughout her life and one that's encouraged by her new 'papa' and the Jewish boy, Max, hiding from the Nazi's in their cellar.

Some of the darker events of the times are shown but the film doesn't concentrate only on the fate of the Jews. It goes to great length to highlight the absolute racism and discrimination of the Nazi's even against their own people. There are a couple of great scenes set around Jessie Owens, American track and field Olympic gold medalist, which I thought were particularly well done. What 'The Book Thief' is asking you to consider is the effect an extraordinary war had upon ordinary people and how it impacted upon love, friendship and family.

We bought the DVD last week and I've watched it twice. It really is a good movie and such a clever blend of dark/light, sad/happy. I'm more than happy to recommend.

The Book Thief is on one DVD and runs for approx. 131 minutes. The film has a '12' classification and I wouldn't recommend it for children much younger as there are some strong themes and some violence.
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Format: Blu-ray
The film takes place in Nazi Germany. The opening narration is done by Mr. G. Reaper (Roger Allam). Liesel (Sophie Nélisse) is going to live with new parents. Unknown to her at this time, her mother was taken away because she was a communist. Liesel lives with some good Germans who care for her as their own. She is illiterate but takes a shine to reading. Liesel gets engrossed in reading books, while her loving adopted Papa (Geoffrey Rush) walks the fine line by hiding Max (Ben Schnetzer) a Jew whose father saved his life in WWI. The film gets its title from the fact Liesel would steal (and then return) books from the Burgermeister.

The film contains both the feeling on impending doom and hope simultaneously. I felt like I was reading poetry while I watched the film. It was executed that well. The performances were spectacular.

Must see film for those who love a great movie. It is an Oscar worthy film for Brian Percival. I appreciate what you did even if the Academy did not.
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Format: DVD Verified Purchase
Having read reviews of this film suggesting its viewing should be accompanied by a box of Kleenex, I promised myself from the outset that I would simply not cry over this one. (I have a reputation for being somewhat emotional, even when just watching TV adverts.) However, my resolve went out of the window as, after having now seen said film at my local cinema last night, I came away desperately dabbing at my eyes in the hope that my economy mascara had not smudged too badly. For it is indeed an emotional film. It is also quite an unusual one in that it mixes the abstract with intense drama. I have not read the book (though I fully intend to now) but understand that it has a much more ethereal quality about it. Thus, it would have been difficult to reproduce that on the screen, other than in limited amounts. Therefore the film starts, and is infrequently returned to, narration by a storyteller who is in fact `death' personified. And this, along with spectacular cinematography, helps to give it a kind of misty-eyed, almost magical feel.

The subject matter, however, is far from that. The viewer is shown the harsh realities of life in Nazi-rising WW11 Germany. And, it's quite a shock actually to discover that they, like us Brits, were just as scared, just as poverty-stricken and just as much at the mercy of the Hitler-led regime. Young Sophie Nelisse, the actress in the lead-role of Liesel, lends a wide-eyed innocence to the whole proceedings and is well supported by a talented Geoffrey Rush and Emily Watson in the roles of her adoptive parents, who take her on (for money ) when she is removed from her own communist mother's care.
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Format: DVD
I had no interest in watching this film; however I was heavily hungover and therefore unable to move from the sofa when it was decided that we were going to watch it....

Really pleased I was unable to resist because this is an incredible film with a hard working cast that bring alive a touching script during an extremely tough time (WW2).

What I loved most about this film is the fact it showed a different side to Germany during the war, it doesn’t shy away from the fact that not everyone was a nazi during WW2 and that in contrast a lot of German people were just living in fear of them, and it does this in such a good but subtle way that when the residents are experiencing being bombed you feel worried and concerned for them despite the fact it’s obviously the allied forces dropping the bombs.

If I was German I might feel a little annoyed that the only time they used actual German in the film is when they wanted to show aggressive nazi speeches or commands, and although I understand why that was done it did feel slightly unfair.

All the cast were exceptional but Sophie Nélisse, Geoffrey Rush, Emily Watson, and Nico Liersch played their roles to an outstanding degree. I really recommend anyone watching this film even if you initially think it’s not the sort of film you would enjoy.

Oh and the narration by death was the icing on the cake, beautifully done.
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