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Red Road 2006

3.9 out of 5 stars (52) IMDb 6.9/10

Jackie is a CCTV operator and she gets a perverse kick out of watching others go about their daily business. Then one day a man appears on her monitor - but he's from her past and she never wanted to see him again. She has no alternative but to confront him - and her demons.

Starring:
Kate Dickie, Natalie Press
Runtime:
1 hour, 49 minutes

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Product Details

Genres Drama, Thriller
Director Andrea Arnold
Starring Kate Dickie, Natalie Press
Supporting actors Tony Curran, Martin Compston
Studio The Movie Partnership
BBFC rating Suitable for 18 years and over
Purchase rights Stream instantly Details
Format Amazon Video (streaming online video)

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: DVD
but this film does.

Red Road is the story of Jackie, played by the extraordinary Kate Dickie in a restrained and sensitive performance, which is all the more powerful for its understatement.

Jackie is a lonely CCTV operator, watching over the streets of Glasgow like a guardian angel, trying to stop people coming to harm. She comes to know some of her "regulars" by their habits, although they don't know her, or the affection that she feels for them.

Outside of work, her relations with real, flesh and blood people, appear less successful. She rarely goes out and is having an affair with a married man that is distant, cold and demonstrative only of how badly Jackie feels about herself.

One day Jackie sees someone from her past on camera, someone she cannot forget, so she starts to watch him.

This is a quiet film, keenly observed and deeply felt; an extremely rewarding watch.

Red Road is part of a collaborative series of films, organised by Lars von Trier, whereby each of the film makers involved agreed to be constrained by a set of rules, one of which was that all the films in the collaboration should share a cast and that therefore all the casting for all the films had to be done at the same time and collaboratively between the teams.

Despite this, none of the actors appear miscast, all of them give finely nuanced performances. The only way that the audience could possibly tell the method of casting is that there seems to be an intimacy between the cast that perhaps points to a longer term involvement than is often seen.

That intimacy is supported by the nature of the film, its themes of love and loss, pain and comfort.

Completely wonderful.
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By MisterHobgoblin TOP 500 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on 8 May 2009
Format: DVD
Red Road is a Scottish film. Revel in those words - they don't follow one another in that sequence very often. And even less often to describe a film of this quality.

Jackie sits in a bubble, surrounded by CCTV screens. She has a control panel and a joystick which she can use to move the cameras and zoom in. She has a telephone to call for help or advice; to summon police; to seek information which is instantly forthcoming. But this is a silent existence. Jackie watches people's lives, but never interacts with them. And Jackie's bubble is next to another bubble, which is in a corridor full of bubbles, each full of CCTV screens and the lone, godlike watcher. Half of Glasgow is under surveillance.

Jackie is a very cold, unemotional character. Occasionally she smiles, and each smile is as rare and beautiful as a pearl. Jackie seems to have no friends, a lover with whom she shares no love, and a family that is a nuisance rather than a comfort.

Then Jackie picks up Clyde on one of her cameras - the man clearly means something to her, but still she seems devoid of any real emotion. She is as warm, as animated as a corpse. Yet as the intrigue builds, Jackie starts to stalk Clyde. Piece by piece, the nature of the relationship is revealed. But not before many false conclusions have been reached. Red Road constantly surprises - not with shock moments or with shrieks - if anything, the constantly subdued sound and behaviour is the shock - but the surprises are the constant re-evaluations of the people. They never react as you might expect, they defy categorization.

This is a magnificent film. The drama and dialogue is understated. The camera angles show a rough side of Glasgow, but one which expresses so much. Never has it been so true that a picture can convey 1000 words. And the composure of the two lead actors is brilliant. They both have such presence, despite having so few lines.
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Format: DVD
A very cleverly constructed film. As other reviewers have mentioned, it takes a while to get going. The director plays with our perceptions of what is happening and about 2/3 of the way through the whole tone of the film appears to change, when we realise that things might not be quite as simple as they appeared. Whilst trying not to spoil the plot, this means that the viewer might see events in the film in a new light. Some of the sex scenes are quite explicit. These can also be seen in a different context when all is revealed towards the end of the film.
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Format: DVD
This is an exceptionally powerful movie. As other reviewers have pointed out, it does take a while to get going, but this adds to the intrigue and provides time for character development. The film is set against the bleak backdrop of Glasgow tenament blocks and these provide a fitting background to Jacqui, a CCTV operator's despair, emotional turmoil and loneliness. The clues to her motivation are revealed in a well-timed fashion, and the ending provides a credible closure. Its hard to say too much without ruining the story - suffice to say, the film deals with the problems of isolation, the search for justice whilst still managing to pick out moments of beauty that are inherent in even the most barren of urban landscapes. The lead actors are extremely strong and the end poignant (particularly the closing scene I thought). Stick with it at the beginning, its well worth it, though you should be prepared for some fairly graphic scenes (sexual / force).
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By Bluebell TOP 500 REVIEWER on 2 Jun. 2007
Format: DVD
Very slowly the reason for Jackie's stalking of of ex-con Clyde is revealed. These two characters are excellently portrayed: both have complex personalities and motivations. The long delay before one begins to realize what drives Jackie's obsession makes the first half or more of the film a bit difficult to understand, but the film-maker maintains a sense of tension and menace that keeps the viewer watching.

Life in high-rise, council-housing estates in Glasgow is bleakly and realistically depicted. This aspect of the film reminded me of the film Train-spotting. Despite being Scottish I found quite a bit of the speech of the subsidiary characters unintelligible-maybe that's because I'm from Edinburgh! I needed sub-titles, particularly for Clyde's violent flat-mate.

It's not a happy film, but a good one, that leaves one moved by the characters' dismal lives.
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