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Customer reviews

4.5 out of 5 stars
320
4.5 out of 5 stars
Hitman Absolution (PS3)
Platform: PlayStation 3|Edition: Standard Edition|Change
Price:£4.99 - £36.95


on 18 October 2017
nice game
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on 13 January 2013
Love it and would definitely recommend for the price of £19.99. Each level makes you really think as we'll as having lots of action.
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on 22 June 2015
Worst Hitman Title yet. Everything what in my opinion was great and distinctive in previous Hitman games was scaled down or eliminated in this game. The grand open-world feeling of Blood Money is totally gone and replaced by smaller, linear sections. The planning of progression and solving a mission is ruined by Instinct Mode. The diversity and motivation in replaying missions by taking different approaches with different weapon loadouts is just not there. Speaking of weapons; except for the silverballers, there are just a bunch of s***ty looking and sounding (granted; the weapon sounds haven't been any good in previous titles) fictitious guns. The slow-mo effect when critically hitting someone totally bugs me every time. The worst part however is the combination of the updated disguise mechanic and instinct mode. In my understanding, the essence of previous hitman titles was freedom of approach; you could roam around the maps, looking for patterns in AI behaviour, check out different routes how to approach your target and how to get out undetected. One way to do this was to disguise yourself to get access to certain areas of the map. In Absolution, it seemed like, disguising yourself was utterly useless, as you get uncovered so damn quickly by AI that you have to walk around potential enemies as if you were performing an elk test on roller-skates. The only way to get around this is to use Instinct mode, which burns out so quickly, somyou either try to avoid using it in the first place or you have to kill some enemies to fill it up, which is pretty ridiculous, as I usually want to disguise myself so I don't have to kill anybody except for my target. The Story is way too prominent and for my taste way too cheesy. I liked about Blood Money that you were simply thrown into these diversive, different looking locations around the globe with just a little intel about your target. It just wasn't neccessary to build more story around it. Everything that made the hitman titles stand out positevily was cut in Absoultion by trying to make it more accessible. Huge dissappointment for me
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on 16 March 2017
All good
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on 29 April 2017
Great game
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on 1 October 2016
Perhaps the defining characteristic of the Hitman series was its flawed genius. Clunky gameplay and a plethora of bugs were offset by novel originality and an atmospheric sandbox world. In `Hitman: Absolution', IO Interactive have perfected the formula albeit at a price.

First off, the perfection: never before has Agent 47 been so charged with menace. What's more, you feel like a killer, a professional whose trade is artful murder. This has been pulled off in a couple of ways. First, IO have brought a physicality to 47 which was missing from the previous games and translates into every kill. Second, enemies can be taken down with far greater flexibility - no more sneaking up behind them at just the right moment only to somehow miss with your garrotte. Third, the shooting system is far more innovative. The new `instinct' system - which allows 47 to blend into his surroundings and monitor his foes - also allows `point shooting': i.e. stopping time to tag your targets before effortlessly taking them down in one deadly sweep. For diehards, this may be cheating, but its availability is limited and, besides, it's by no means forced upon you, acting as a cool flourish rather than a central gameplay mechanic.

However, there's a price to this: the free form sandbox gameplay in the previous games hasn't been left intact. Likely to make room for a smoother world with fewer bugs, IO have streamlined levels. The upshot of this is that the world is more economical, the gameplay richer somehow. But the structure is more linear and the settings themselves chronologically compartmentalised into sections. Generally speaking, there's just one main path through each level, with few detours - and stealth is a constant must as certain enemies will see through disguises. At no point are you being forced along. Levels focused on taking down a target have numerous approaches that can be taken, and, unless you want to go Rambo, patience is a must, just as before. But the overall feeling is that although the levels are large, their compartmentalisation makes them less complex. A mistake in one section won't affect the rest of the level, which sucks out some of the fun for perfectionists and diehards who enjoy balancing the consequences. It's much easier in this respect.

But the package IO Interactive have offered up is probably their best-rounded and it feels like a lot of love has gone into it. Although the story is simple, the characters are the best yet; the guns are incredibly satisfying to use; the environments are as atmospheric as ever; and the music doesn't suffer from the absence of the series' trademark composer, Jesper Kyd. The game has been described elsewhere as Lynchian - something which is very true, the elements at play here derivative of an Americana that is dark, morbid and surreal.

`Absolution' isn't flawed in the same way that its predecessors were. The perfected gameplay and streamlined structure marks a radical step in a new direction for the series. Hopefully, later instalments will keep the new gameplay system and bring back some of the freeform sandbox complexity (minus the bugs), but for now, the Hitman experience isn't going to get much better than this.
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on 15 February 2016
You all know this game is so good.
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on 9 October 2014
As someone who had never played any of the older Hitman games it was always going to feel awkward jumping in when several older games have been released, though in the end Absolution was more than good enough to turn me in to a convert. There are a few drawbacks but in general this is a solid game that's only a few steps away from being one of the true greats.

To start with, the game has done really well in terms of presentation. The graphics look slick, the voice acting is very well done, the music sets a fantastic tone and the voice actors are all competent in their own right. It's all well executed and does a good job of creating a fitting atmosphere for the game.

The story however is just okay. The plot itself isn't all that ridiculous considering that this is a game but the characters are just caricatures and most of them are sorely in need of some depth; this being my first Hitman game also made it feel like I missed some greater context sometimes which didn't exactly help with feeling immersed.

The gameplay on the other hand feels great. Most of the game puts you in open ended levels where you can kill your targets in all sorts of creative ways and which gives you a lot of room to explore and experiment. You can use any of the dozens of weapons that are at your disposal but also make use of the environment, ranging anywhere from car explosions to inconspicuous electrocutions. Absolution is at its best when you explore the level to slowly and carefully plan your move before striking your targets all the while managing to avoid raising any eyebrows. Patience is most certainly a virtue here.

The game also offers plenty of replayability. Contracts mode allows players all over the world to create custom challenges for you to complete, which allows for a near-endless amount of new content for you get in to. This will be especially true for those of you who prefer a challenge, plenty of which is provided in this mode.

Unfortunately, there are a few things Absolution gets wrong too.

The AI in particular needs some improving, especially in regard to disguises that you might be wearing while sneaking through a level. These work in way where the people dressed the same as you will be the only ones who can detect you as an assassin. It's reasonable to get detected by all the meat shop workers while sneaking around in a small shop since there's a few of them and they all probably know each other, but it doesn't make any sense to do the same thing with the police. Chicago hires thousands of police officers yet somehow the disguise doesn't work with any of them even though there is no conceivable way that they all actually know each other.

It's also a little irritating that you can't save the game where you want. The only time the game saves is when you complete a level, or if you're playing on a lower difficulty, find a checkpoint within the levels. This isn't that big a problem but it does mean that once you're playing the game it forces you to commit a minimum amount of time, which seems out of date in this day and age.

Another thing that is particularly annoying is just how forgiving the game is. While the game encourages you to be stealthy and sneak through everywhere, it also gives you ample room to simply fight your way out of bad situations. This isn't necessarily a bad thing, since some of that is to be expected, but there are far too many levels where you can simply shoot your way through if you really wanted to, and the fact that this is possible is absurd in a game that is supposed to be based around stealth. The Point Shooting system in particular allows you to quickly kill a few enemies in mere seconds, which feels like it's really out of place and would be better suited to an adrenaline-filled action game instead.

Overall the game is good fun and generally gets things right, although there are a few niggling problems that stop it short of being truly great. It's certainly worth your time.
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on 26 November 2012
Considering the large amount of time I've spent playing this, I feel a bit harsh giving only 3-stars, there are some good but way too many bad elements:

Positives

- Some of the levels are brilliant, open ended, funny, loads of options and accidents avaialble.
- The challenges for each level provide lots of re-playability without feeling boring.
- The graphics, music and kill-sequences are superb, much more fluid and adaptable.
- A simple interface makes for easy control, making complex timing challenging but never frustrating.
- The new 'Contracts' levels are mildly diverting and can act as a welcome break from the main story.

Negative

- A dull, dull DULL story that is not wanted or needed, no-one wants a moral or emotional Agent 47...
- A large number of rubbish levels that are simply "get from A-B without being seen", or Uncharted-esque press button fight sequences.
- The accident kills are made blindingly obvious, and sledom require timing, you just set it up and then wait for a kill to be confirmed whilst doing something else.
- An inconsistent disguise/suspicion system.
- Terrible cutscenes and zero-dimensional characters (bad guys are all perverted swear factories, women are all pornstars, and the little girl to whom 47 is mysteriously devoted might as well be a platic doll.

It's a really mixed bag, we all know the best bits of previous games, the best levels were often contained buildings, with lots of subtle options, a bit of humour and some real originality (the hotel in the original hitman, the apartment in silent assassion, the country house in contracts, the suburban house and xmas party in blood money). At times Absolution recalls and recreates these levels, and when it does it is brilliant, but too often it loses it's way and becomes a matter of going through the motions of subduing and hiding guards until you can progress to the next good level. Losing the ability to inject food with poison was a very bad call...

Blood money is still far and away the best hitman game, all Absolution had to do was more of the same, with better graphics, and with the challenges component for re-plays, but instead they've tried to make it into a film, except with none of the depth or finesse required to make us give a solitary crap about any of the characters, IO have just made more bland cutscenes and more plot-advancing levels.

Having said all that, I've played it a lot, and will play it a lot more, and it's still better than a lot of the mindlessly linear, bulletfests that are currently stuffing up the market "cough...COD...cough!"
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on 23 November 2012
Perhaps the defining characteristic of the Hitman series was its flawed genius. Clunky gameplay and a plethora of bugs were offset by novel originality and an atmospheric sandbox world. In `Hitman: Absolution', IO Interactive have perfected the formula albeit at a price.

First off, the perfection: never before has Agent 47 been so charged with menace. What's more, you feel like a killer, a professional whose trade is artful murder. This has been pulled off in a couple of ways. First, IO have brought a physicality to 47 which was missing from the previous games and translates into every kill. Second, enemies can be taken down with far greater flexibility - no more sneaking up behind them at just the right moment only to somehow miss with your garrotte. Third, the shooting system is far more innovative. The new `instinct' system - which allows 47 to blend into his surroundings and monitor his foes - also allows `point shooting': i.e. stopping time to tag your targets before effortlessly taking them down in one deadly sweep. For diehards, this may be cheating, but its availability is limited and, besides, it's by no means forced upon you, acting as a cool flourish rather than a central gameplay mechanic.

However, there's a price to this: the free form sandbox gameplay in the previous games hasn't been left intact. Likely to make room for a smoother world with fewer bugs, IO have streamlined levels. The upshot of this is that the world is more economical, the gameplay richer somehow. But the structure is more linear and the settings themselves chronologically compartmentalised into sections. Generally speaking, there's just one main path through each level, with few detours - and stealth is a constant must as certain enemies will see through disguises. At no point are you being forced along. Levels focused on taking down a target have numerous approaches that can be taken, and, unless you want to go Rambo, patience is a must, just as before. But the overall feeling is that although the levels are large, their compartmentalisation makes them less complex. A mistake in one section won't affect the rest of the level, which sucks out some of the fun for perfectionists and diehards who enjoy balancing the consequences. It's much easier in this respect.

But the package IO Interactive have offered up is probably their best-rounded and it feels like a lot of love has gone into it. Although the story is simple, the characters are the best yet; the guns are incredibly satisfying to use; the environments are as atmospheric as ever; and the music doesn't suffer from the absence of the series' trademark composer, Jesper Kyd. The game has been described elsewhere as Lynchian - something which is very true, the elements at play here derivative of an Americana that is dark, morbid and surreal.

`Absolution' isn't flawed in the same way that its predecessors were. The perfected gameplay and streamlined structure marks a radical step in a new direction for the series. Hopefully, later instalments will keep the new gameplay system and bring back some of the freeform sandbox complexity (minus the bugs), but for now, the Hitman experience isn't going to get much better than this.
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