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4.7 out of 5 stars
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4.7 out of 5 stars
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on 27 April 2003
Spielberg and Williams have a brilliant track record in both the eyes of critics and commercial success. That is the power that these two have when a movie is credited with both of them. However, Williams' success in his other works such as that of the Star Wars Saga, Jurassic Park and Indiana Jones to name but a few have never really had the pure emotion and haunting score of Schindler's List. This is simply his finest work, achieving great success at numerous awards including the academy award for best original score in 1993, and well deserved.
Schindler's List has the audacity to stand on it's own as a classical masterpiece that so many scores attempt to be. Williams' and Spielberg not enough, Perlman on the violin brings the most beautiful yet deeply haunting score of Williams' to life. I must admit that i am one for melancholic and depressing scores, nothing moves me more, and this ranks on the top of my list.
There are however some criticisms that this score has received, however these are also its strength. There is a high degree of repetition, but the melody is so beautiful that the yearning is still not satisfied, the melody in solo by violin or piano has such an oppressing overtone that one cannot hold back the tears. Yet it seems that the solos are interpreted with a small hope that seems to be held on to so tight in desperation and in oppression, and this small hope is what really drives the score.
This is quite simply a classic of scores and no movie score collection will ever be complete without this masterpiece.
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on 27 March 2003
A truly beautiful piece of music, from start to end, and totally deserved of the best music academy award for John Williams. Mr Williams has written a lot of tripe over the years but this is a piece of classical modern genious, helped by the superlative playing of one of the finest violinists of our age, Mr Itzak Perlman. This is a piece of music which in it you can hear the agonies of those terrible, terrible times. It is uplifting yet angst ridden, and is full of memorable unforgettable themes. As I have said this disc won the oscar for best music, the Piano, by Michael Nyman ran it a close second, which is also a fantastic piece, only for Shindlers List the Piano would have won the oscar against any contender. It really was a shame that two great scores had to go head to head in the same year. Schindlers List (both film and music 10/10). Tony
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on 9 February 2001
A rather low key, sombre soundtrack (hardly surprising considering the film's subject matter). Williams' soundtrack has been criticised for using a palette of few tonal colours. However, I can promise you that this music has a cumulative effect upon the listener. There is a degree of repetition, with two themes in particular arising in a number of variations, but when listening to the soundtrack as a whole these become more moving and powerful, drawing you into the melancholy atmosphere that is so convincingly established. At the heart of this music lies a tremendous dignity that echoes the ultimate mood of the film (despite its many horrors). Perlman's violin playing beautifully expresses the haunting main melody which grows in emotional power on subsequent playings. For me the world created within this soundtrack is large enough (the bombastic marches of Williams' action scores would be alien here)to deliver a very fulfilling listening experience indeed
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on 14 February 2004
I am not musically trained,let alone classically trained,but I know when something is right: Van Dyck,V8 Chevy,Laurel & Hardy. This soundtrack fits the film and subject like a glove.The repetition is welcome and not gratuitous. Schindlers List would have worked in the silent era with this soundtrack. Listen carefully and you will notice how much it reminds you of the music from the silent era.Inventive,emotive and human.It works.
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on 22 February 2000
This is indeed an exact soundtrack so some may find the music a little repetitive however, with music this beautiful can that be a bad thing! Williams has yet again produced music entirely suitable for the film subject so if you found the film too moving maybe steer clear of the CD Perlman is without doubt one of the world's finest violinists and excels himself here. Perhaps not to everyone's tastes but one of my absolute favourite cd's
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on 16 October 2014
Simply the finest film soundtrack ever written. Itzhak Perlman's performances are breathtaking. My only criticism is that track 06 'Oyf'n Pripetshok / Nacht Aktion' and track 12 'Yerushalaim Shel Zahav' are not the originals from the film and I don't think they're as good. Still, the rest of the album is flawless. I've simply deleted those two off my iPod. I would love it if they'd come out with a special edition and include the originals of those two songs.

I recommend anyone who likes this soundtrack look up an English translation of the Yiddish lyrics to the song Oyf'n Pripetshok - played during the scene with the girl in the red coat - to really appreciate why Spielberg chose to use it in the film. When you know what the words mean, the scene in the film becomes even more heart-wrenching to watch.
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on 27 February 2014
Magnificent music from one of the best films ever. John Williams shows why he is one of the greatest writer of our time. The music from start to finish is so moving a tears at your heart to point of bring tears. I love the sadness of strings and this soundtrack is no exception.

For those who have said in their reviews that it is say repetitive of course it is, it's a film score and will have a common theme throughout. This does not in anyway detract from it's brilliance.
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on 6 April 2014
I must say when I first got this I kept going back to the same haunting music that was in the title tune. Then when one starts listening to the rest we come to understand the compilation & enjoy the rest of the music. Thoroughly magical a really beautiful album to be enjoyed. Well done is what I say! I'm sure anyone looking & wondering if they should get this, don't delay, just enjoy!
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on 12 March 2016
I heard part of this on Desert Island Discs fairly recently, and I looked it up and subsequently bought the CD. It is SO beautiful, and I'm very glad I bought it. The basic melody is deceptively simple, but played to perfection by Itzhak Perlman, and the other performers/instruments. I can't believe how I'd missed this before.
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on 2 May 2011
At first I felt the music was really repetitive on playing this CD in the car, but listen to it properly at home and concentrate and it really is terribly moving. The subtlety and recollections of the scenes in the film, and the beautiful way in which one matches the other, with small tweaks that vary the main theme of the score, works perfectly.
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