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D-Day: The Battle for Normandy
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on 8 March 2018
...at least that's what you would believe if this was your only reference to this pivotal event in world history - although Hemingway did lend a hand. Montgomery must have really upset Antony Beevor, because he takes every opportunity to paint him in such an unfavourable light that it's hard to believe he made it to the end of the war above the rank of private.
I finished the thinking I new need to find a more objective history - the only saving grace was that I only paid 99p!
One last irritation, during the occupation he refers constantly to Milo mindbenders, a reference to catch 22 apparently, Antony,just say black marketeers.
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VINE VOICEon 12 July 2016
Beevor's account of the D-Day landings is typically thorough, and those who enjoyed his accounts of the battle of Stalingrad and the fall of Berlin are unlikley to be disappointed. But, I would have to agree with some other reviewers here that perhaps the sheer scale of the campaign in Normandy has stretched Beevor's talents too far on this occasion.

Beevor is good on drawing out the inevitable behind-the-scenes rivalries between the military leaders and statesmen involved in the planning and execution of D-Day. Montgomery comes out of it particularly badly, and Beevor does seem to favour the might and organisation of the US forces over the apparently ill-prepared and poorly disciplined British involvement. This is never completely backed up with overwhelming evidence, so it does make for a slighly biased read that gets the hackles rising.

As ever, Beevor is good on the detail of combat, but the names of the various divisions blur after a while, and what the book really lacks is more strategic and historical analysis of why D-Day was so important, and where it fit into the wider picture of shaping the end of the war in 1945. This is tackled a bit half-heartedly in a very short Aftermath chapter, as if Beevor himself has grown bored of his efforts to pull together too much material. Beevor seems to be more of a details man, but military history can occasionally benefit from less minutae and more probing and succinct analysis to make it really valuable.

Reading the Kindle version, one is struck by just how unsatisfactory the e-reader is for this sort of material. Photos, footnotes, maps and references are clumsily presented, and although the chapters themselves are readable enough, the whole thing is probably better read and enjoyed on paper.
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on 25 July 2013
I bought a book (Stalingrad) by this writer, from the Air Ambulance charity shop & I was hooked. Very well written and keeps you involved as if you were there. This book prompted me to look up other titles by this author hence this one - D Day - I thought I had read and knew nearly everything about the subject - WRONG!!! It was like reading about another battle altogether. We as the public only hear/read what the authorities want us to hear/read. It actually gives a true account of the battles and mistakes by all sides involved with the consequences, some fortunate and some unfortunate. It shows that the Germans feared the British military most but were also fearful of the American resources. The British did far more than have been given credit for and interestingly - casualties were up to ten times the rate in Russia in a tenth of the area involved in the battles. Many German regiments ceased to exist in front of the British who continually wore them down.
Buy this book D Day and also look up Stalingrad by the same writer, I cannot recommend them enough.
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TOP 1000 REVIEWERon 20 March 2018
Having read many books on the subject of D-Day over many years, it was interesting to read Antony Beevor's interpretation of the events, which offered insights that I had never encountered before.

Overall, this was a fascinating read, which offered several different perspectives, including new research sources and served to fill the gaps in my existing knowledge base.
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on 10 July 2014
This is an amazing book for anyone wanting to learn more about the landings, but equally importantly, the battles that took place following the landings. I think sometimes people fall into the trap of thinking the carnage and the bloodshed on the beaches what what Normandy was all about. This wasn't the case on all the beaches, and certainly the major fighting took place after the landings.

I visited Normandy to look at the beaches 6 years ago, and whilst there, someone else on the trip was reading this book. The knowledge and background they could add to our trip was fantastic. As a precursor to visiting again this year, we all read the book in advance. This is the single best piece of advice I could give to anyone wishing to visit Normandy. We were better equipped to plan the route and knew a lot of background about.

Those of you that are planning a trip there, a few tips:

- Start at Merville Gun Battery. It's one of the eastern most attractions and is one of the best. They have a great sound and light show there, plus a fully restored Dakota.
- Visit Le Grand Bunker- Musée du Mur de l'Atlantique
- Visit Point du hoc
- See the remaining mulberry harbor at Arromanches, and go to Musée du débarquement to learn all about this amazing feat

If you are not planning to go to Normandy, start planning.. it's amazing, awe inspiring and very emotional. If you are interested in this book, you will love it.
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on 16 April 2018
This book changed the face of war history writing. There was for me a great feeling of sadness for all the suffering and waste of war, World War Two in particular. Any war history which does not lave that feeling of sadness id deficient in my view. What a waste of life and happiness is brought on by War
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on 14 February 2018
This is a first class guide to the battle that turned the war and shaped present day Europe. The attention to detail is incredible and the historical value of this book would huge to anyone studying this part of recent history. It’s easy to read although I found it hard to follow the movements of the various divisions and regiments at times. Recommended to anyone who has a passion for the Second World War.
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on 6 May 2018
A very detailed account of the D-Day invasion and the following months. A lot of descriptions of relatively small actions withn the larger battles. A fairly “dense” read
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on 10 January 2018
Highly readable. I kept recognising little incidents that are portrayed in various war films. Not too complicated and dealing with the bigger picture, the individuals experience on both sides, the terror, the great tragedy and cost of it all. I paid for the audible download too and have really enjoyed being read to.
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on 19 July 2014
It is just about the best book I have ever read about the Normandy landings and the battles thereafter. Nearly every page brought more and more astonishing bits of history. My overwhelming sympathy was for the thousands (maybe millions) of French people who lost their homes and possessions and in many cases were killed throughout these dreadful battles. Since reading this book I have become an even more convinced Pacifist; the men simply run over by tanks or shot willy-nilly without a thought of the humanity involved. Thank you, Antony Beevor, for an absolutely obviously truthful window on history.
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