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Customer Review

9 June 2018
This is a fine continuation from pt1 of this series. Unlike the shy and reserved Jim Faulkner of before, our young recruit is now much more typical of your average young squaddie - a likeable and promising soldier but also a hard drinking, smoking, self-assured, and after a few trips to sample the local off-camp nightlife, a more 'worldly' young man. We also see much more of Jim Faulkner's struggle to balance the demands of a military career with those of his personal life and relationships.

After having a established a reputation for being fond of a drink (or ten) there is a poignant and moving episode early on where an older comrade, Mick, pulls Jim aside and uses himself as an example of the dangers of falling into the heavy drinking culture of army life, subtly warning him of the danger of missed opportunities and promotion, and not ending up the same way. Another touching and perhaps prophetic moment is Jim Falkner's encounter with an older woman whilst on leave, promising to mention and remember her in his memoirs should he ever decide to write them. 

In pt1 the author took the time to explain most of the military terminology, and so, much of that used here needs no further explaining. There is, of course, a lot more used in this second part (now that Jim is 'doing the job for real' even if he is still learning), which the author doesn't explain, but given this series is about a man's life and experiences in both his military and personal life rather than just a 'who's who' and 'what's what' of the army, it really doesn't detract from the enjoyment and flow of events. 

Although another fine instalment, this chapter of Jim Faulkner's life doesn't (for me) quite live up to that of the first part (more a 4.8 or 9 than an easy 5*). This is no reflection of the writing or content, but possibly more to do with my own experience; much of the book here includes a lot of what I would call the nitty gritty of army life and Jim's first overseas posting, much of it quite specific to his own regiment/trade, and I found myself skimming over some parts of it - for a civilian reader (or indeed a fellow signalman), I imagine this aspect would have held greater interest, so ironically, this may be an instance of a non-military reader enjoying this part of the series more than their ex-military conterparts (scaleys excepted of course lol). In stark contrast to this, Jim Faulkner sees for the first time some of the sharp-end of military service on the streets of Belfast, where pretty much everyone who toured there did more than their share of front-line soldiering and patrols - whatever your trade or regiment, everyone doubled as infantrymen too.

Overall, another first-class effort blending fact and fiction, bringing Jim's story to life, and again, countless memories for some and providing a moving and realistic account of military life for others. It's good to read a genuinely authentic 'fictional' military memoir, one that many a reader will see echoes of themselves in rather than some ridiculously unbelievable story better suited to tv sensationalism. By the end of this second part, we see the clear struggle between Jim's determination to be the best soldier he possibly can, and his overfondness of alcohol and the more unsavoury aspects of army life, and we leave him at a point not knowing which side of the struggle will determine his future career ... looking forward to pt3!
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Product Details

5.0 out of 5 stars
7
£1.99