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MaPe (St. Paul, Minnesota USA)

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206 Bones: (Temperance Brennan 12)
206 Bones: (Temperance Brennan 12)
by Kathy Reichs
Edition: Paperback
Price: £7.99

5.0 out of 5 stars Let me explain... (some spoilers), 17 Nov. 2013
To be honest, I'm not sure if this is really a 5-star book. But, I stand by my rating because this is the first Reichs novel after a long while that I didn't at some point find irritating - and that's even though all the usual story elements are there (anthropologist investigator, story-so-far summaries, finger-curling gestures, love-life dilemmas...). Of course, Tempe does once again get herself into mortal danger, but somehow it doesn't seem so infuriatingly out of place as it usually does. The corrupt academic subplot was quite interesting. Good to be reminded that education and intelligence doesn't necessarily equal integrity. Of course, we could have definitely done without the sermon at the end. She really could have saved that for an afterword or some such place. Personally, I could also have done without Ryan - I might be alone in this view, but I'm so done with him. I really don't think there should be any more of that "will they or won't they" teasing; he screwed her over, she should cut her losses and move on. Alas, that's not likely to happen. But that being said, even their rapport didn't strike me as annoying in this book - so all in all, I found it an enjoyable read (more so than expected, even!), and I for one am hopeful as to the future of the series. It might be picking up again!


Monday Mourning: (Temperance Brennan 7)
Monday Mourning: (Temperance Brennan 7)
by Kathy Reichs
Edition: Paperback

3.0 out of 5 stars Good main story, but the rest... (spoilers!), 27 Oct. 2013
First of all, let me say that I quite liked the principal story line in this book. It was quite interesting, had some believable red herrings along the way, tied in nicely with some relatively current events, and aside from the unnecessarily detailed explanations of the Stockholm syndrome, would have deserved more than three starts.
HOWEVER... The whole reset of the interpersonal relationships that takes place in the beginning of each new book is *really* getting annoying. Claudel is back big time. The guy who practically wrote her fan mail at the end of the first book could just as easily be the guy from the *beginning* of the first book. Or any of the books in between. Ryan... come on. This time she couldn't try to convince us that they hadn't yet "done the deed", but this whole soap opera bickering thing? And then the "twist" of the explanation and everything's fine? The guy has been lying by omission for months, and they're just two peas in a pod again? Not to mention that such an omission is not even consistent with the usual dynamics of their relationship, be it professional or personal. They use each other as sounding boards for just about everything that happens. Moving on... The book actually got points while I was reading it for making me believe that Tempe's friends and/or family weren't going to be placed in direct danger because of the case for a change. Yeah, right. And as for Tempe herself... come on, the bad guys come after her personally *again*? How likely is that? And even assuming that we only hear about the "interesting" cases during which this happens, how come no suspect ever breaks into other people in the lab's houses or takes them hostage?
All in all... I like the series and I like the Tempe character. But series are built on character development and keeping the loyal reader (or viewer)'s interest. If there is no character development from instalment to instalment (I don't mean within individual books, there is some of that) and there is no variation in the plot, the interest is bound to wane. I know it's happening to me.


Kommandant's Girl (MIRA)
Kommandant's Girl (MIRA)
by Pam Jenoff
Edition: Paperback

4 of 5 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Kind of an entertaining read, but nothing more, 13 Feb. 2012
I decided to give this book a try based on the many an enthusiastic review here - but what a disappointment! It was presented as a compelling and thought-provoking piece of fiction, whereas in reality it is closer to a trash romance novel (I'm not sure if "sex-free" qualifies as "trash", but it's close enough). The characters are cardboard, unconvincing and Americanized, the plot developments are unbelievable, the book is sprinkled with anachronisms and - I cannot believe I'm making this observation - actually seems to be poorly edited - it seems like the author couldn't decide whether to write it in the present or past tense, so there are leftovers all over from having changed her mind as she went along. I have a feeling this was written for a teenage (or younger) audience with the intention of familiarizing them with the WWII. Still, I cannot shake the impression that this might have been a great book if it had been handled with more skill, which is probably why I described it in the title as an "entertaining read" - but only if you're looking for something to read on the beach. If you're hoping for a memorable historical novel, steer clear of this one!
Comment Comment (1) | Permalink | Most recent comment: Sep 11, 2013 10:29 AM BST


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