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H. McMc

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The Bone Clocks
The Bone Clocks
Price: £5.99

6 of 8 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars A book of two parts: one of the parts is good, 18 Feb. 2016
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This review is from: The Bone Clocks (Kindle Edition)
There were some absolutely lovely parts to this novel. The opening chapter with Holly Sykes running away in the summer of 1984 was told fabulously. Her interactions with Ed, and even Ester Little, were beautiful, as was her brief stay as a picker at the fruit farm. The odd-weird sci-fantasy battle in the student couple's living room was totally out of place, and I just skipped over it.
This pattern repeats for the next few chapters. We get to know characters, love them and loathe them as appropriate, and follow them on adventures of love, family, travel, career and personal struggle. These parts are beautiful to read, with marvellous descriptions. Some parts feel deliberately poetic, which I found forgiveable on the grounds that Mitchell pulled it off.
What I was unable to forgive were the bizarre fantasy-immortal-vampire interludes, which became longer and more frequent, until they apparently took over what would have otherwise been a grand novel. These sections shifted the atmosphere of the book in a way that I could not handle, and I found I had no desire to continue reading what could only be described as drivel. The personality change around 3/4 of the way through was terrible, and so, I did something that I never do - I decided not to finish the book.

I've no idea how this books sits with Mitchell's others, this is the first I've read. I probably wouldn't be venturing his way again, which is a shame as he clearly can write, but needs to rein it in when he gets taken over by the sci-fi goblins.


Drawing & Sketching: Practical drawing projects illustrated step-by-step with advice on techniques and composition
Drawing & Sketching: Practical drawing projects illustrated step-by-step with advice on techniques and composition
by Stan Smith
Edition: Paperback

5.0 out of 5 stars Fantastic and Inspiring, 2 Oct. 2012
This book is wonderful. It gives comprehensive guidance on a myriad of different techniques and subjects. It's in colour throughout, so you can really appreciate te authors work, and the message that he is trying to get across. I love this book. Anyone who has any interest in drawing should have this invaluable guide in their collection.


If You Could See Me Now
If You Could See Me Now
by Cecelia Ahern
Edition: Paperback
Price: £7.99

1 of 3 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars what a load of clap-trap, 16 July 2011
This is a great concept for a children's book. But this, sadly, is badly written, poorly executed, sloppily edited, predictable, dull, slow, unimaginative, and just a sad waste of a tree. Good bits? erm... Nice sparkly cover.


After Breathless
After Breathless
by Jennifer Potter
Edition: Paperback
Price: £5.99

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars a summer read with a difference, 5 Jun. 2011
This review is from: After Breathless (Paperback)
I love this book. I first read it when I was at school, and have re-read it again recently. Narrated by a grown up and married Janey, she reminisces and ruminates on a crazy summer in France, as an undergraduate student. A glimpse of a face on the TV triggers memories of lust and of how it came to an end. A wonderfully honest book, romantic in the intense but naive, all-or-nothing way of first love. The writing captures the atmosphere beautifully: the heat of France, the squalor of some of Janey's lodgings, the lust and longing between Georges and her, and the inevitable fall, are all written in a compelling and consuming style.

A wonderful book about how detached from reality young love can get in the heat of the Bordeaux summer.


Treasure Island
Treasure Island

3 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Brilliant, and it gets better every time, 20 Feb. 2011
This review is from: Treasure Island (Kindle Edition)
Like many other reviewers of Treasure Island, I first read this when I was younger and thoroughly enjoyed it. Having forgotten about it for a number of years, it was one of the first things I downloaded when I got my shiney new kindle. I'm so thrilled to have been able to read this book again. It is dynamic, fast-paced, witty, absorbing and utterly compelling. RLS wrote an amazing tale nearly three hundred years ago, and that story is still as gripping today. The language is archaic, but just enough to be quirky and original, rather than confusing and heavy. There are many books that have been written in the past few years that are much more 'heavy' and hard-going to read than this. Treasure Island is utterly timeless. The Kindle edition is also a credit to the format - I have handed over good money to publishers for kindle editions that are rotten to the core with negligent typing errors. Treasure Island, however, has very few. I'm assuming a lot of the unusual spelling is faithful to the original, rather than error.
Treasure Island is a joy to read, and is clearly a very inportant book. Just change your facebook language to Pirate english if you have any doubts...


Blood, Sweat and Tea: Real Life Adventures in an Inner-city Ambulance
Blood, Sweat and Tea: Real Life Adventures in an Inner-city Ambulance
Price: £2.49

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Refreshingly cynical, 20 Nov. 2010
As this was a free download, i had quite low expectations of this book, but it was the best book I've not bought. Reynolds informative and conversational style really draws the reader in, making each entry flow like anecdotes in the pub. I've been tagging, bookmarking and highlighting left right and centre, wanting to share various entries with various people who i think will enjoy them. There's a story for everyone in here. It's had me laughing out loud, but has also provoked thought on manner and dignity of death, and the way that government beaurocracy is interfering with the way health are care professionals carry out their roles. It's nice to read something that isn't all lovey dovey - it's clear that blogging is cathartic for Reynolds, and although some people find his 'moaning' tone tiresome, it's refreshing and reminds the reader that emergency service staff are real people too. They provide a vital service, and are too often treated as commodities.
Great read, I'll be happily handing over my pennies to read the sequel.


2-Year Protection Plan Plus for Kindle (6" Display, Wi-Fi, Latest Generation), U.K. customers only
2-Year Protection Plan Plus for Kindle (6" Display, Wi-Fi, Latest Generation), U.K. customers only

5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Unnecessary, 7 Nov. 2010
Check with your house contents insurance - mine is insured against accidents in the home (sitting on, dropping, etc). As for manufacturing faults, these are covered by consumer law. Conclusion: Protection Plan Plus? I would say it's not worth the paper it's written on, but they don't even do that, they email it and you have to print it out yourself... :-(


Charlie Big Potatoes
Charlie Big Potatoes
by Phil Robinson
Edition: Paperback

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars How not to die on the pavement like River Phoenix, 27 Feb. 2010
This review is from: Charlie Big Potatoes (Paperback)
This book is fantastic - I don't often award five stars. The author has clearly dont his 'research' when in comes to drugs, paranoid freak-outs and psychiatric hospitals, but is able to keep such a dark and funny slant on the whole mess. The writing style is superb, disjointed and hard to follow through the drug fuzz, and bell-clear when Charlie's mind is sober. Charlie's thoughts are put onto the paper in such a realistic manner, written in the moment. The asides are funny, sometimes hilarious, and the innocence with which Charlie greets his mates' cynicism is painful. The journey that the reader is taken on through the book forces a certain amount of introspection - not something that would normally set off a 'Dick Lit' comedy, but it really puts the icing on the cake, brining home Charlie's struggle with addiction and mental illness. This book is fab, and gives the reader everything they want and more.


Tweak: Growing up on Crystal Meth
Tweak: Growing up on Crystal Meth
by Nic Sheff
Edition: Paperback
Price: £8.99

3 of 5 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Irritating and irrelevant, 16 Feb. 2010
I struggled to finish this book, and I normally quite enjoy these sorts of true stories about personal struggle and battles with addiction. In similar books, the strength of the human will against it's formidable foe is totally enthralling. However, I found Tweak quite dull, Sheff's style quite irritating, and I just wanted to smack him (excuse the pun). His privilaged environment obviously tainted his attitude and outlook, and the story stunk of a spoilt and bored American Middle Class kid wanting to have a bit of fun. Perhaps the tale is more relevant to american culture, but for me it holds no engaging qualities. Give me Junk or Wasted any day. Even Irvine Welsh's Trainspotting feels more true to life. Want a moving and emotive account of struggle and determination whilst batting addiction? Then carry on looking...
Comment Comment (1) | Permalink | Most recent comment: Jan 12, 2011 10:13 AM GMT


The Shadow of the Sun: My African Life
The Shadow of the Sun: My African Life
by Ryszard Kapuscinski
Edition: Paperback
Price: £9.98

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars It gets under your skin, 16 Feb. 2010
The author opens this book with the comment that Africa is too diverse in people, climate and culture to be encompassed by the short 6-letter name. He then goes on to describe, in a series of short recollections of his first-hand encounters, the true diversity and richness of the largest continent. These stories are funny and touching, personal and unpredictable, horrific and megalomaniacal, warming and emotive. They are as varied and inconsistent as Africa herself.

If you have never been to Africa, and find yourself disinterested in this far-away all-too-foreign land of droughts, famines, unfathomable politics and military coups, you will find something in `Shadow of the Sun' that will touch you, stir something in you, ignite your dormant interest. `Shadow of the Sun' is a beautiful but realistic portrait of this colourful but scarred land. The bite-size stories ensure that the reader cannot become fatigued, but is permanently excited by this journey through a newly-independent continent.

On the other hand, if you have ever been to Africa then the stories here will transport you to the very place that you remember. The pace of life, the smells, the culture and attitude of the people, the organised chaos of the streets, the wordless communication that makes trivial the language barrier, the power struggle simmering under the surface of each place.

I love this book, and I read it each year. If I do not visit Africa in person, I travel there with Kapuscinski in these enchanting memoirs.


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