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Rosoft Mike "Because Software Shouldn't Be Hard..." (Milton Keynes, UK)

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Stadium Chase
Stadium Chase
Price: £2.39

2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A beautiful tale of the journey of an insane man, 31 Oct. 2013
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This review is from: Stadium Chase (Kindle Edition)
Stadium Chase is a well written tale that documents just how wonderfully stupid a man can be for the right cause. Adam deserves a medal and institutionalising doing this - publicly committing himself to cycling to a few away matches would have been admirable. Actually doing that would have been doubly so. Committing himself to cycling to EVERY away match in a whole season and ACTUALLY DOING IT takes my breath away.

The book takes you inside of the mind of Adam as he puts his body and soul through what can only be described as the hell of stupid-distance cycling. It tells of the people he met, the support he received (or otherwise) and what it felt like for Adam at every step along the way.

It's all for charity - the proceeds are split between the Redway School and the MK Dons Sports and Education Trust - two rather lovely organisations who work to redress the balance for kids who've started their lives with the odds stacked against them. That's reason number one to buy a copy.

It's also a lovely read - genuinely entertaining in parts and positively inspiring in others - Dan McCalla has done a grand job in capturing the essence of the journey that Adam's journeys took him on. That's reason number two to buy a copy.

Adam cycled to Yeovil, Hartlepool and Carlisle! Cycled! That's a few thousand more reasons to buy a copy.

So buy a copy. You won't regret it.


The Long European Reformation: Religion, Political Conflict, and the Search for Conformity, 1350-1750 (European History in Perspective)
The Long European Reformation: Religion, Political Conflict, and the Search for Conformity, 1350-1750 (European History in Perspective)
by Professor Peter G. Wallace
Edition: Paperback

28 of 32 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Open University A200 Set Book, 7 Dec. 2008
If you're studying the Open University course A200 1400-1900 (From Medieval to Modern) then this book is a set book and you'll need it to complete the course. You'll rely heavily on the book throughout the earlier modules of the course, and an understanding of Wallace's views on the reformation(s) will hold you in good stead for the course final examination.

If you're not studying the course, then I'd suggest that you've got to be very interested in the period in question for this to be a must-have purchase. Wallace is clearly an expert on the period in question, however it's not an easy read for anyone other than a historian.


Moodle E-Learning Course Development: A complete guide to successful learning using Moodle
Moodle E-Learning Course Development: A complete guide to successful learning using Moodle
by William Rice
Edition: Paperback
Price: £24.99

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars A good introduction to Moodle, 7 Dec. 2008
I'm a little wary of any book that talks about online learning tools, as I'd like to think that if the tools are any good, then I really should be using the tools themselves to learn. Having said that, I actually learn best from books (although that may well be down to the quality of the tools available) so the idea of a book that shows me how to get the best from Moodle was worth a read.

This book is a good introduction to the whole Moodle and E-Learning concept, and contains a lot of useful instruction and ideas as to how to get the best out of it. It provides good explanations of the main tools available to Moodle users, and identifies a number of problem areas that users are likely to struggle with, so will undoubtedly save readers a lot of time.

Where the book was less useful for me is that it focusses heavily on an academic environment, and is less easy to translate into how the tool could be used effectively in a corporate environment, which is my area of interest. I'm aware that the academic environemt is where Moodle is heavily used, but the book claims that it's written for "a teacher or a corporate trainer" and I found it less useful from a corporate perspective.

If you learn best away from a computer screen, or want a guide you can read in the bath (or anywhere else of course) then this will be a really useful book. If that's not you, then you'll find better resources online.


The Timewaster Letters
The Timewaster Letters
by Robin Cooper
Edition: Paperback
Price: £6.39

1 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Still giggling 18 months later..., 7 Dec. 2008
This review is from: The Timewaster Letters (Paperback)
I have stopped laughing inbetween, but each time I think of this book, I start giggling again. It's one of the funniest books that I have ever read, it is completely, beautifully pointless and deserves a place on every bookshelf.

I'm not sure if it's a 'guy thing' or whether my wife has no sense of humour (and I'm sure I'd have noticed that before now) but she didn't get it, and could only look on in annoyance while I doubled up and literally cried with laughter for days on end. I read and re-read the book initially over a period of days, and kept expecting the effect to wear off, but thankfully it didn't - I bought copies for all my friends and received giggling phone calls in return.

At times I found myself feeling quite sorry for the recipients of his letters, as in some cases they were clearly (initally at least) trying not to be rude to him. Even the guilt wears off pretty quickly and is replaced by an open-mouthed sense of wonderment as you begin to worship once more at the majesty of the man's work.

All I have to do is think of Parmanu and I'm giggling again.

Robin Cooper is a god and I love him:-)


Exploring History 1400-1900: An Anthology of Primary Sources
Exploring History 1400-1900: An Anthology of Primary Sources
by Rachel Gibbons
Edition: Paperback
Price: £14.02

62 of 62 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Open University A200 Set Books, 6 Dec. 2008
This is a set book for the Open University course A200 (1400 to 1900 - From Medieval to Modern), so if you're signed up for the course, then you need it. If you're not signed up for the course, then it's difficult to assess whether it will deliver what you need, as the examples presented are chosen to complement the course itself. There is a wide range of primary source material here from a very wide date range, and while some articles are very dry, some are able to really bring the events they're describing to life. Personally, the sections detailing the trial of Charles I will live with me for many years, and were some of the most moving and inspiring pieces I have read, although I should state that I was reading the book as part of the OU course mentioned above.


Logitech Cordless 2.4 GHz Presenter - Presentation remote control - radio
Logitech Cordless 2.4 GHz Presenter - Presentation remote control - radio

5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The Best Presentation Tool Available, 6 Dec. 2008
I work as a trainer and spend a lot of my time in front of PowerPoint presentations, and as a result have reviewed pretty much every presenter tool I've been able to find. The Logitech presenter is the best I have found by a sizeable margin, and a lot of its appeal is down to its simplicity and usability.

The batteries last for ages, it fits comfortably in your hand and has a good range (I've presented from all around rooms of more than 100 people and never once lost a connection) and most importantly it has buttons for all key presenter tasks. It has buttons for Next and Previous, F5 and Esc and the all important B (black) button, along with a laser pointer for highlighting key points during your presentation. The USB connector slides into the unit itself when not in use, which is a very useful feature.

I've seen lots of people waxing lyrically about the vibrating timer, although I've never found it useful, primarily as I always seem to be able to see a clock when presenting, but it's a nice idea anyway.

The one thing I'd suggest is that you look after it - I'm now on my third because the two previous ones have been 'borrowed' by impressed colleagues.

If you're a presenter, then buy one.


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