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E.M. Tippetts (London)

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Bachelor Number One (Kindle Single)
Bachelor Number One (Kindle Single)
Price: £1.49

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Another good one, 1 Feb. 2013
I didn't know how this one ended (I live abroad, don't watch television, and my contact with the author tends to be of the 140 character tweet variety), and I'm glad I didn't because I love the way Shubaly sets up a story and controls the flow of information. His prose is noticeably stronger and smoother - it's been getting that way with each piece he writes.

Not to spoil the story, but suffice it to say, it's clear why CBS did not want to let him write about his experience. He sees straight through the strange and sick phenomenon that is reality television, and he does so as a self described 35 year old adolescent. I confess, I've often wondered if people just forget schoolyard cruelty, or just fall for it when it's dolled up as entertainment for grown ups.

As with all of Shubaly's Kindle Singles, I highly recommend this one.


A Reckless Magick (Unladylike Adventures Kat Step)
A Reckless Magick (Unladylike Adventures Kat Step)
by Stephanie Burgis
Edition: Paperback
Price: £6.99

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars I didn't want it to end!, 20 Jan. 2013
The only bad thing I can say about this book is that it's the end of the series, and I didn't want to say goodbye to these characters. While Burgis leaves plenty of story threads that could be picked up again in future books, this book has a satisfying end that resolves the main conflict in Kat's life, specifically, who her mother was and what kind of scandalous magicks did she practice?

The story opens with Kat and family arriving for Angeline's wedding, and her betrothed's family hasn't exactly welcomed her into the fold. She's too poor, both in terms of money and social connections, and her future mother-in-law is not about to hand over the keys to the castle. Meanwhile, one of the other wedding guests is a woman who knows Kat's father very well, which is odd, because Kat's never heard a single thing about her. Yet a little bit of spying soon reveals that this woman practices magick, and not the proper, Guardian kind.

And Kat would love to ponder this further, only someone keeps trying to take Angeline's life, really, that's quite distracting for our heroine. Who, though, is at fault? The reluctant soon to be in-laws? The mysterious witch wedding guest? The jealous cousin who'd once hoped to wed Angeline's fiancee? Only Kat knows enough about magick and mayhem to get to the bottom of this.


The End Of All Worlds
The End Of All Worlds
Price: £3.99

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Truly Epic, 19 Jan. 2013
A clever mix of the modern day world and Norse mythology, this book begins with an Englishwoman being lost in the Icelandic highlands, only to return with a very strange story to tell. While the fantasy aspects of the book are as magical as one would expect, the storyline in modern day Iceland is every bit as fascinating and well drawn. This book has a huge cast of characters who are spread across multiple locations, both real and mythical, and while the plot is driven by scientifically explained climate and volcanic activity, the real story involves alfar, trolls, disowned gods, a family of mixed human and alfar blood, and, as the title suggests, the End of All Worlds. This is a book that will take you on a journey both cultural and mythical. Highly recommended!


The Long Run (Kindle Single)
The Long Run (Kindle Single)
Price: £1.49

12 of 12 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Brutally honest, but uplifting, 26 Dec. 2012
I don't normally read drug memoir essays. I'm tired of long, arrogant ruminations by people who've wrecked their lives and believe that in the process they have learned some deep truth about how existence really is this pointless wasteland (does it ever occur to them that if you destroy anything, it tends to look pointless and wasted afterwards?) and those of us who haven't dared to live on the edge subsist in a fiction of our own making (really, if I want to see truth, I think not taking hallucinogenics is the way to go, but hey, that's just me.) I'm amused by the idea that a gritty description of the smell, taste, and texture of vomit spewed into a gutter is a great artistic accomplishment.

This essay, however, walks the sword edge of truth between needless glorification of alcoholism and simplistic platitudes about getting clean. Shubaly's drinking didn't wreck his life in the conventional sense. He's one of those people with enough brain power that he can subsist on a cocktail of drugs and alcohol and still get straight A's in school and hold down a job. By the same token, quitting drinking didn't land him in a blissful existence full of love, acceptance, and beauty. Rather, this essay reads like a journey through the proverbial tunnel to the light at the end, except the light isn't the kind that warms you up and makes the world look glorious (he tells the reader what drug to take if you want to see that one), but rather the kind that illuminates life as it is, with all its shabbiness and drudgery, its disappointments, hard choices and all around frustrations. Most important, it faces head on the fact that once you give up one obsession, life will still ask you, "So what now?" and while the answers might come more automatically with practice, they will never get easier.

I am glad Mishka's back and willing to tell the tale of where he's been. He and I were middle school classmates, people who could probably recognize each other on sight (if we're looking), pronounce each others last names (Shubaly has the stress on the second syllable, if I remember correctly), and have on rare occasions said something to the other, and on even rarer occasions said something that requires more than a smirk, chuckle, or sarcastic thumbs up in response. For years we've been connected on Facebook, but only recently have I seen him tearing up the virtual hallways with his crazy sense of humor and posting the odd (in all senses of the word) comment on someone's wall. There are a lot of things I was happy to leave behind in middle school, but I'm glad my association with Mishka wasn't one of them. Life isn't always pretty, but it's the people we share it with and who pace us on the long run that make the journey worthwhile.


A Most Improper Magick
A Most Improper Magick
by Stephanie Burgis
Edition: Paperback
Price: £6.99

4 of 5 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Fantastic!!!, 10 Aug. 2010
This review is from: A Most Improper Magick (Paperback)
I sat down to read this book and couldn't put it down (and I read a lot of books, so that's saying something). It was hilarious, heartwarming and totally immersive. The plot moves along at a good clip - there isn't a whole lot of down time and not a single wasted scene. The characters are well formed and believable (magic and all that aside). A must read for anyone who likes Jane Austin or other Regency Era books, or who just likes a good adventure with a lot of clever twists and turns. Definitely not just for middle grade readers!


Bitter Seeds
Bitter Seeds
by Ian Tregillis
Edition: Hardcover

2 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Sheer Brilliance!, 11 May 2010
This review is from: Bitter Seeds (Hardcover)
In the interests of fair disclosure, I should first say that I know how the trilogy ends and have already read the second book. Yes, I do know the author, but I know a lot of authors and don't post a ton of reviews. This book warrants one.

This series is one of the most exciting projects I've ever seen come together. Tregillis has got a keen sense of the weird and Bitter Seeds is alternate WWII history based on the premise that the Nazis succeeded in making the ubermensch in a secret compound. The British respond by turning to magic, warlocks to be precise. This is *so* not my kind of thing. I'm not a history buff (but you don't have to know WWII to follow this plot), and I really don't read alternative history. Mixing science fiction and fantasy is a major pet peeve of mine. Furthermore, I don't normally relate well to psychopaths or upper class twits who speak to evil spirits. War propaganda plots and secret war project thrillers rank towards the bottom of my reading list.

You won't want to miss this series. Ambitious as it is, Tregillis pulls it off and the complex plot he sets in motion in this first book pays off gorgeously in the next two. This book has already been rushed back to press since its initial release, and here's hoping that's only the first of many times this happens.


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