Learn more Shop now Shop now Shop now Shop now Shop now Shop now Learn More Shop now Learn more Click Here Shop Kindle Learn More Shop now Shop now
Profile for Jim Marshall > Reviews

Personal Profile

Content by Jim Marshall
Top Reviewer Ranking: 1,832,921
Helpful Votes: 47

Learn more about Your Profile.

Reviews Written by
Jim Marshall

Show:  
Page: 1
pixel
The Loner: Nils Sings Neil
The Loner: Nils Sings Neil
Price: £18.35

5.0 out of 5 stars Review from a fan of Young's 70's classic recordings, 10 Oct. 2016
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This is a beautifully put together collection of Neil Young covers by one of his long-term collaborators

My previous experience of Lofgren's music had me mark him down as a rocker with the ability to pen a good tune and the judgement to keep the guitar pyrotechnics (just) on the right side of tasteful - Cry Tough is a personal favourite, albeit some of the lyrics are of its age (i.e a bit misogynistic - Mick Jagger would have been proud).

This however is very different. It's from an older, wiser Lofgren, and is just him accompanying himself on either acoustic guitar or piano. This means every song is sung as a ballad, even the ones recorded by Young as rockers e.g. (Like a Hurricane, Don't Cry No Tears). It's testament to Logren's sensitive delivery and the quality of Young's songwriting that the whole thing feels natural and of a piece.

Lofgren's voice isn't as powerful or distinctive as Young's but with the simple backing the whole thing works very well as a gentler take on some very impressive songs from a master songwriter.


Modern Lovers (Bonus Tracks)
Modern Lovers (Bonus Tracks)

0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Old gold from a unique place in the early seventies, 13 Dec. 2015
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
I love this old album, which apparently I've bought three times over 40 years. Naïve, driving, proselytising and touching in equal parts, Jonathan Richman's unique world view (although it's possible David Byrne saw the Modern Lovers a few times ...) played by with the original Modern Lovers, a hard-rocking Velvet-Underground inspired band that disbanded some time before these tracks saw the light of day.

It's old history now, but then (and now) the Stooges, MC5, and New York Dolls were regarded as the precursors of the punk movement, but I think this band is just as big a link, especially for mid-70s US punk which (while not as in-your-face as UK punk) I think had more depth.

The extended version is worth it for the chilling, hippy-hating "I'm straight" (as in, Jonathan doesn't do drugs) which stands with his best.


The Rough Guide to Ireland (Rough Guides)
The Rough Guide to Ireland (Rough Guides)
by Shafik Meghji
Edition: Paperback
Price: £12.99

5.0 out of 5 stars The best, 13 Dec. 2015
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
Toured the Irish West coast with friends by bicycle, this took us to some really great roads / places / bars / eateries we would have missed had we just followed the obvious route on the map. Recommended.


Tamiya 300087030 Masking Tape with Dispenser, 6 mm x 18 m
Tamiya 300087030 Masking Tape with Dispenser, 6 mm x 18 m
Offered by Audio Emperor Japan
Price: £2.69

5.0 out of 5 stars Fast delivery, no issues, 13 Dec. 2015
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
Fast delivery, no issues


You Can Make It If You Boogie
You Can Make It If You Boogie
Price: £14.69

6 of 6 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Rock'n'roll's premier chiropodist strikes gold, 5 Sept. 2005
He wrote 3 songs 25 years ago that appeared on an (admittedly excellent) Scottish indie band's debut album, then took up chiropody for a living. In 2003 he released a solo album. Perhaps unsurprisingly, James Kirk's first solo release (that I'm aware of) didn't appear on Sony with a multi-million dollar PR campaign behind it, but on an obscure German label. But don't let that worry you, the wait was more than worth it.
Edwyn Collins was the front man in Glasgow's Orange Juice, and the most prolific songwriter (in terms of songs committed to vinyl in their short life). Edwyn's songs, while supremely catchy, well written and witty, were caustic and sewn through with a fey world-weariness and resignation not entirely fitting his relative youth. But there was a second writer in the band.
James Kirk's songs were different, distant and other worldly rather than bitter and world weary. Together, Edwyn's and James's song writing, teamed up with enthusiastic playing, made Orange Juice's debut LP 'You Can't Hide Your Love Forever' a superb if slightly homespun LP in its day, and (depending on your choice of source material) either the bed rock of Brit indie rock to this day.... or at the very least a sign post to that which would follow. I still love it today.
Fast-forward 20+ years, and James Kirk's solo album appeared to little fanfare (it certainly slipped under my radar on release). My loss - two years later and I've tracked down a copy that's not left my playlist since the shrink wrap came off.
The songs and the singing are more mature (befitting a by now presumably 40-something year old) without losing the tunefulness, intelligence and wit that were OJ's hallmarks way back when. The overall sound is quite 1980s, but in a good way: twanging country-fied guitars (a mix of electric and acoustic), catchy bass runs, and not a drum machine in sight.
The song writing is excellent, period. There's not a bummer on it, with catchy, well crafted tunes and intelligent lyrics showing a sly wit, set off by deft, confident playing. Kirk has never had the strongest of voices, but he sings within his range and has good backup from his band (featuring Aztec Camera's original bassist if I'm not mistaken) and backing singers.
The overall effect mixes the charm of Orange Juice with a maturity that comes with age. Songs like 'Any Old Iron' (a favourite) show an earthy appreciation of sex and relationships ("You're naked in a cowboy hat/I've got a Napoleon Bonaparte" indeed) that would be too basic for OJ while the lyric to "Outré" shows that the longing for love hasn't been lost.
If you appreciate good song writing with a realistic but still open-hearted approach to love and life, enjoy a twanging guitar and don't insist on an overblown, overplayed performance, then I recommend getting hold of a copy of this, and soon. Only thing is that when I asked my local record store about it, they said it had been deleted. I found mine on the internet, but you may need to move fast to get a copy. You won't regret it if you do.


Guero
Guero
Offered by Revolution Media
Price: £6.48

3 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Great album - regardless of past glories, 19 Aug. 2005
This review is from: Guero (Audio CD)
A number of previous reviews have focussed on comparing this to Beck's earlier releases, some favourably, some less so. Well, this is the first Beck CD I've picked up (spur of the moment after seeing him perform some of these tracks on 'Later'), so I guess this is a 'stand-alone' review - i.e. without reference to past glories.
It's quite understated (minimalist production, vocals low in the mix), so it takes a few plays to get under your skin - but once the individual songs register, it just keeps getting better. There's a slow burning groove to many of the tracks - it would make a great party album (assuming your party goers are old enough to look beyond the top 10).
The lasting impression is of subtly catchy tracks driven along by a slow-cooked mix of bass riffs, acoustic guitar, hand claps and finger snaps, overlaid with low key but tuneful vocals.
Some of the tracks rock (E-Pro, Rental Car), some have a old-timer county twang (Farewell Ride, Emergency Exit), others are almost pure rythmn (Black Tambourine), and Broken Drum is just beautiful, but with the possible exception of the final bonus track Chain Reaction they all stand - indeed develop with - repeated plays.
Highly recommended.
PS inspired by reviews of other Beck albums, I've since picked up the highly rated Sea Change album. It's a great if very different album (haunting breakup songs rather than grooves - Broken Drum would slot right in), but it doesn't diminish Guero. Ignore the nay-sayers; there's room for more than one style in an artist's pantheon, and Beck is talented enough to deliver across genres in spades - Guero is ace.


Guero
Guero
Offered by Revolution Media
Price: £6.48

11 of 12 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Great album - regardless of past glories, 19 Aug. 2005
This review is from: Guero (Audio CD)
A number of previous reviews have focussed on comparing this to Beck's earlier releases, some favourably, some less so. Well, this is the first Beck CD I've picked up (spur of the moment after seeing him perform some of these tracks on 'Later'), so I guess this is a 'stand-alone' review - i.e. without reference to past glories.
It's quite understated (minimalist production, vocals low in the mix), so it takes a few plays to get under your skin - but once the individual songs register, it just keeps getting better. There's a slow burning groove to many of the tracks - it would make a great party album (assuming your party goers are old enough to look beyond the top 10).
The lasting impression is of subtly catchy tracks driven along by a slow-cooked mix of bass riffs, hand claps and finger snaps, overlaid with low key but tuneful vocals.
Some of the tracks rock (E-Pro, Rental Car), some have a old-timer county twang (Farewell Ride, Emergency Exit), others are almost pure rythmn (Black Tambourine), and Broken Drum is just beautiful, but with the possible exception of the final bonus track Chain Reaction they all stand - indeed develop with - repeated plays.
Highly recommended.
PS inspired by reviews of other Beck albums, I've since picked up the highly rated Sea Change album. It's a great if very different album (haunting breakup songs rather than grooves - Broken Drum would slot right in), but it doesn't diminish Guero. Ignore the nay-sayers; there's room for more than one style in an artist's pantheon, and Beck is talented enough to deliver across genres in spades - Guero is ace.


in Too Much Too Soon
in Too Much Too Soon

15 of 15 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Never has an album title been more appropriate, 10 July 2003
This review is from: in Too Much Too Soon (Audio CD)
After the plaudits currently heaped on the Dolls' first album (more now than then), it's easy to overlook the fact that they recorded a second before they imploded in a mess of lipstick and heroin. How does it fare today?
Pretty well, really. It's more tongue in cheek than the first, with tracks like "Bad Detective" and (especially) "Stranded in the Jungle" verging on the Vaudevillean - perhaps Johansen was giving his not-entirely-serious Buster Poindexter persona an early airing without letting the rest of the band in on the secret?
There are some classic Dolls' rockers, with "Babylon" (NYC, of course), "Puss and Boots" and "Who Are The Mystery Girls?" more than standing comparison with the best on the first album. It has to be said that there are a couple of duffers too - "It's Too Late" is plain dull, while Johnny Thunders' (probably not his real name...) vocal on "Chatterbox" is embarrassingly weak in comparison to Johansen's arrogant, taunting snarl. (Thunders fans are cordially invited to try the Heartbreaker's "LAMF" as an antidote).
The album closes with a couple of stormers. "Don't Start Me Talking" is a stomping, old-style r'n'b number credited to Sonny Boy Williamson, which sets the scene for the album's (and for me, the Dolls') finest track, "Human Being". It's a crude, bellowing roar with a honking sax and a great vocal from Johansen, which epitomises the band's up-yours, in-your-face attitude: "Well if you don't like me, go ahead, find yourself a saint, go ahead now, try to find a boy who's gonna be what I ain't, and what you need is a plastic doll with a brash coat of paint who's gonna sit through the madness and always act so quaint" - and it gets better from there on in. The track sums up the band perfectly, and closed the career of a group that did indeed sample far too much, far too soon (three of them died young, not something to be proud of), but one that has had an influence far out of proportion to anything they dared dream of.
Comment Comment (1) | Permalink | Most recent comment: May 2, 2009 8:31 PM BST


You Cant Hide Your
You Cant Hide Your
Offered by entertainment trader
Price: £15.94

12 of 12 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Such talent, so little recognition, 5 Dec. 2002
This review is from: You Cant Hide Your (Audio CD)
Dear God, is it really 20 years since this forgotten gem was released? Back then, this seemed to be the sound of things to come (at least in Scotland, anyway). Great songs primarily, with witty, wordy lyrics, great upbeat tunes and a stomping beat. Uniquely Scottish too, with its combination of dry, self-deprecating wit, the hint of slightly bitter world weariness (at age of - what? - all of 24?), the feeling that there are better time around the corner...for others, at least ('only my dreams satisfy the needs of my heart'...)
The contrast between the irrestible tunes and the offbeat, sometimes melancholic but always intelligent lyrics was at the heart of the Orange Juice (and Edwyn Collins) experience, and probably the reason why he's never received the plaudits and commercial success his talent deserves. He's recorded good stuff since, but this was his first (and perhaps best) thing to get a major label release. Should you come across this in a second hand bin......don't even think twice, pick it up immediately.
Comment Comment (1) | Permalink | Most recent comment: Nov 14, 2014 3:12 PM GMT


Page: 1