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cairns (Haddington)
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Britains Least Used Stations
Britains Least Used Stations
by David Brewer
Edition: Paperback

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Railman., 5 Mar. 2017
A very attractively presented book that even appeals before you open it. The author is to be congratulated on his dedication and resourcefulness in visiting and photographing all these stations; which are the length and breadth of Britain: I am sure that he will readily admit that he is not a young man, so resilience was also required. Gives the impression that this was a labour of love that just had to be carried out. Very much an "after" book; reason being that the majority of the stations included do not look as they did 50 years ago when there would have been much more infrastructure on view. Most would have had buildings on all platforms, semaphore signals and signal boxes, with many having goods sheds, sidings, coal drops, watering facilities and more importantly-staff. These being absent are no fault of the author: you can only work with what is there, still the stations all look clean and tidy, and Georgemas Junction has gained a freight loading facility; possibly in relation to Dounreay. Changed days at GJ: I remember the class 26 awaiting us, the train splitting and the two halves going to their destinations. I travelled by many of the stations included, in the 70s; indeed stopping off at many, particularly on the Kyle line where I photographed them prior to the line's threatened demise that thankfully never occurred. There are also some of the stations that just were not there in the 70s. Back to the book, the many colour prints are accompanied by details and relevant statistics. A very nice book for anyone interested in railways, particularly those like me who will never visit the localities ever again. Coming in the "wipe clean" format, this is a book that was very well worth producing, and is very well worth getting: full marks to everyone involved.


Tyneside Railways: The 1970s and 1980s
Tyneside Railways: The 1970s and 1980s
by Colin Alexander
Edition: Paperback
Price: £13.48

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Railman., 2 Mar. 2017
A small cross section of what could be found in the Tyneside area, mostly during the 70s and 80s. Not all locations are covered but there is a reasonable mix, with most of the reproductions being in colour: although a couple are not of good quality. Always an interesting area as regards the railways; my particular favourite - freight, was always abundant during the early 70s, it is strange to think that many of the loco types featured had a life span of 20 years or less: they seemed to have always been there and would go on for ever. Brought back some memories that can never be recaptured: good times indeed. Being mainly after my era, the book does not quite chime with my times, but does give a flavour. Never travelled by Metro, but did some of the routes by BR, and of course rode the previous route to Carlisle. Will return to experience the Metro later this year. As with many of the books in the genre, this one comes with wipe clean covers.


Suburban Railways of Tyneside
Suburban Railways of Tyneside
by Alan Young
Edition: Paperback

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Railman., 1 Mar. 2017
A very well researched and very interesting book. Do not be misled by the cover; the work is not just about the Metro but a history of all the Tyneside suburban routes: those which later formed the Metro system, and those that never made it. Fascinating throughout, this is a great guide to the railway history of the once very industrial area which has all of the stations given their own story, and the informative text is accompanied by many illustrations, mostly black and white, and track diagrams. Published in 1999, the story has moved on since then, but this does not detract from the book. A brilliant conception, the Metro put the area at the forefront of inner suburban transport, although dogma, in the shape of the deregulation of buses, provided a setback: last time that I was in Newcastle centre I noticed that various company's buses near Eldon Square, were stood with their engines running! The prevention of this was a part of the schemes philosophy. I never travelled on the Metro - something that I am going to rectify later this year: but I did use a lot of the route during BR days. There is also an extra chapter on the long gone, but very quirky and interesting SSM&WCR railway, which is almost an Elstree Studios invention, but no; it did exist. There are still parts of the area that could be incorporated into the Metro: only time, the will and finance can ensure that this happens. Highly recommended, and perhaps an updated issue should be contemplated by the publishers.
Comment Comment (1) | Permalink | Most recent comment: Mar 20, 2017 4:24 PM GMT


Railway Hotels
Railway Hotels
by Michael Patterson
Edition: Paperback
Price: £11.83

5.0 out of 5 stars Railman., 8 Feb. 2017
This review is from: Railway Hotels (Paperback)
A very interesting book about hotels formerly owned by various parts of the railway throughout it's history; and all the illustrations - mostly in colour, are provided with thumb nail histories. Great many architectural styles feature, and happily most of the hotels featured are still with us, although some in different use. (Look at the fabulous retirement flats that the Felixstowe hoteI has been converted to). Always liked to stay in BTH hotels: they did usually lack investment, but most parts of our infrastructure did in the 70s, so they were not out of place. I stayed at the St. Pancras hotel a few years ago - magnificent: one of the wonders of the world. Not all former railway hotels are shown, but this is a good selection. I also recommend Oliver Carter's "British Railway Hotels" which gives more background and P. A. Land's excellent "Sauce Supreme" which is an insiders account of the dogmatic destruction of BTH, and the blatant anti competitiveness of the privatisation by Major's government. Recommended as a slightly out of the ordinary railway book that can be enjoyed across a wider spectrum.


British Rail Class 20 Locomotives
British Rail Class 20 Locomotives
by Pip Dunn
Edition: Hardcover
Price: £26.12

3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Railman., 28 Jan. 2017
As one of the "few serious followers": a statement that I disagree with, this is unfortunately a book of two halves. Although claiming to look at the loco's lives, the golden years of operation between the end of steam and the introduction of classes 56/58 is sparsely covered: the main plank of the book being about their use on passenger duties. I was extremely disappointed that the extensive freight movements are barely covered; I did not expect a day to day account of this, rather more of a day in the life of, perhaps showing one going through a works or depot maintenance, a typical set of freight diagrams and an idea where they could be found stabled, with illustrations, and their journeys along obscure and long gone infrastructure. That would not have required much space and would have enlightened those that were too young to see these great locos at their height. I certainly fondly remember them, and even a few years ago when I heard one starting up I just ran round to see it: that was the draw that they had. I shall never forget one Friday night on Chesterfield station in the early 70s for the sheer amount of traffic passing through, much of it hauled by 20s, and the sight of three 20s on a coal train coming up to the main line from Seafield colliery near Kirkcaldy: bliss! The accompanying illustrations although good are never full page so some of the detail is not discernible. This book is unfortunately not in the same league as the "Visions" works on the classes 56 and 66. We still await the definitive class 20 work. There is a reference to class 47 - 1733 being the first to be painted blue, but that is debatable being that it was a special livery and not the standard Monastral blue. For some reason sprinkled throughout the text is a capital Y with digeresis; particularly in the name "John "and the word "technically": see how many you can spot. All in all I found the parts on passenger haulage quite hard to get through, although I agree that as part of the story they need including, but not as an alternative to the freight aspect; particularly as it was their raison d'être and what they spent most of their time doing. I fully appreciate the effort gone into the book, and the availability or otherwise of data from 40 years ago plus, but sadly view this book as a wasted opportunity.


White Acrylic Sheet Cut to Size, Plastic Sheet, White Acrylic Perspex 5mm Thick (50mm x100mm)
White Acrylic Sheet Cut to Size, Plastic Sheet, White Acrylic Perspex 5mm Thick (50mm x100mm)
Offered by signprintlab
Price: £2.49

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Railman., 25 Jan. 2017
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
Absolutely square and neatly cut; got this to fit to a non smooth wall in order to fix a self adhesive 'phone holder. Perfect.


iPhone Cable 1m / 3.3ft Pro-E Nylon Braided Lightning Cable/ iPhone Charger Cable for iPhone 6 / 6s / 6 plus / 6s plus / 5 / 5s / 5c / SE (Silver)
iPhone Cable 1m / 3.3ft Pro-E Nylon Braided Lightning Cable/ iPhone Charger Cable for iPhone 6 / 6s / 6 plus / 6s plus / 5 / 5s / 5c / SE (Silver)
Offered by Pro-Electronic
Price: £5.69

1.0 out of 5 stars Railman., 25 Jan. 2017
A rugged looking cable that stopped working after six weeks. Do not waste your money, a total load of rubbish.


EMUs A History
EMUs A History
by Hugh Llewelyn
Edition: Paperback
Price: £16.58

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Railman., 30 Dec. 2016
This review is from: EMUs A History (Paperback)
This book is a guide to units post nationalisation right up to modern times. It is not; nor intended to be, a comprehensive technical guide to the machines, rather a beginners guide: albeit with pictures that will impress the knowledgeable. All areas where they operate are covered and with many of the liveries that they carried: although, as you would expect given the numbers in service, the South East corner predominates. It is a decent book, but I would have thought that the abbreviation appendix, which states much that is obvious, would have included what; for instance, the acronyms HAP, CIG, REP etc meant. These can obviously be found elsewhere, but no book of this type should require the reader to crosscheck using other media. There is also a misspelling of Ben Ainslie's surname on page 125. Recommended as a good overview of what I remember of the units that I travelled in, mainly in the early seventies: being used to travelling, as I did, on Cravens DMUs, the Mersey units and the big express units on such as Brighton services were in a different league.


On the Slow Train Again
On the Slow Train Again
by Michael Williams
Edition: Paperback
Price: £9.99

5.0 out of 5 stars Railman., 23 Dec. 2016
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
Another excellent book from Michael Williams: an intelligent writer coupled with a fondness and knowledge of railways. Usual format of railway journeys on branch lines across Britain, all well described and with acute observation of the line side landscape and the people he encountered there. Interesting reading throughout and with wide appeal: I have been on some of these lines in the distant past, and it is enlightening to see that they are not just still with us, but in some cases usage has risen sharply. Very nostalgic and highly recommended. Just a couple of small matters: on page 104 the avalanche shelter at Friog is not as described, the only one of it's kind in Britain, there is also one near Attadale on the Kyle line. Secondly on page 135; although I.K. Brunel and Sarah Guppy did win the design competition for the Clifton suspension bridge, and parts of this design and chains from IKB's Hungerford bridge were used, because of his death W.H. Barlow and John Hawkshaw built the bridge, which did vary enough to class this as a joint effort.


Nintendo Switch Stand, Lamicall Foldable Tablet Stand : Desktop Stand Holder Dock for Nintendo Switch, iPad pro 10.5 inch, iPad Air 2 3 4 mini, kindle, Nexus, Desk, Accessories, Tab and Other Tablets (4-11 inch) - Silver
Nintendo Switch Stand, Lamicall Foldable Tablet Stand : Desktop Stand Holder Dock for Nintendo Switch, iPad pro 10.5 inch, iPad Air 2 3 4 mini, kindle, Nexus, Desk, Accessories, Tab and Other Tablets (4-11 inch) - Silver
Offered by LamicallDirect
Price: £22.99

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Railman, 19 Dec. 2016
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
Great device for my iPhone 6s plus, and very well designed. Ease of adjustment over a wide range of angles means that the 'phone can be used whilst on the stand, the split cradle means that the 'phone can be easily lifted off whilst charging, and with 2 finger holes in the base for ease of movement on a flat surface. Shop around - can sometimes be very expensive, but not so on Amazon.


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