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Warren Legg (UK)

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USB C to DisplayPort Cable (4K@60Hz) CHOETECH USB 3.1 Type C (Thunderbolt 3 Compatible) to DP Cable(4ft/1.2m) for Galaxy S8 / S8 Plus, 2016 / 2017 MacBook Pro, MacBook, ChromeBook Pixel etc
USB C to DisplayPort Cable (4K@60Hz) CHOETECH USB 3.1 Type C (Thunderbolt 3 Compatible) to DP Cable(4ft/1.2m) for Galaxy S8 / S8 Plus, 2016 / 2017 MacBook Pro, MacBook, ChromeBook Pixel etc
Offered by CHOETECH
Price: £30.00

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars This cable works for 5k / 60Hz with MacBook Pro 15 2017 and DELL UP2715K USB-C to DisplayPort, 6 Sept. 2017
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
WORKS WITH MACBOOK PRO 15 2017 and DELL UP2715K

I have been able to get the Dell UP2715K monitor working well at full 5K resolution / 60Hz with my new Apple MacBook Pro 15 2017

These cables arrived Today. I plugged them in (both in rear USB-C ports). Straight away, they were detected and I am able to use the monitor as an external Retina display at 5K / 60Hz. No other config or SwitchResX required.

The cables are really well built, and are a great price - currently reduced from £29.99 to £11.99!

N.B.I deselected the system preferences > Energy Saver > Automatic graphics switching option. This is because I read on another post that this may help. N.B.

For reference, MacBook pro 2017 is the touchbar version, with Radeon Pro 560 4GB graphics card (16GB RAM).

VERY HAPPY WITH THIS PURCHASE


Keep The World Guessin
Keep The World Guessin
Price: £9.71

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Awesome Hip Hop from the B-Town Dons, 26 Feb. 2005
This review is from: Keep The World Guessin (Audio CD)
Absolutely wicked hip-hop with razor sharp lyrics and booming basslines - drops like musical semtex. Iye-95 skilfully rips complex skratches and precise cuts through the brutally clean production. The MC's (Buzz and Junior Red) combine impressively with counter-poise and a seemingly telepathic intuition... Their styles switch like a blade with machine-gun intelligent lyrics of penetrating force.
My personal favourites at the mo are "Suink" and "Tek Rok" as I think these exemplify what digitek does best - kick-ass crowd rocking tunes. But all the tracks are wickedly constructed, and the favourite(s) change from week to week. Bears lots of listens, and grows well - tracks emerge with depth. Its an organic album that feels like it has been put together with "vision and heart".
A blaizin debut from the most exciting kru in UK hip-hop. Bless your decks with it!


Goodness and Justice: Plato, Aristotle and the Moderns
Goodness and Justice: Plato, Aristotle and the Moderns
by Gerasimos Xenophon Santas
Edition: Paperback
Price: £35.99

4.0 out of 5 stars The ancients illuminated. Moderns as fleeting shadows...?, 6 Nov. 2003
I thought this book gave a thorough and accessible overview of Socratic, Platonic, and Aristotelian political philosophy and ethics. The analysis was well structured offering a credibly argued interpretive position on each.
However, one expects the book to concentrate more heavily on the structural comparisons with contemporary normative theory regarding justice/goodness. Whilst the opening chapter promises such, this emphasis is quite absent through the majority of the work. There is argument concerning the anti-subjectivism of the ancient moral conceptions, though this seems rather in the peripheral of the author's vision, than at the central focus of the text.
This book is worth buying for the way in which it summarises recent literature within Ancient Greek moral theory. This is highest calibre exegesis and analysis. In my opinion, it would have been more intellectually interesting (and more aligned to the book title) if the ancient/modern comparison had been explored with more vigour.
I gained much from this book, which was an enjoyable and worthwhile read (despite the numerous typographical errors - which should be corrected in further re-prints).


I Might Be Wrong (Live Recordings)
I Might Be Wrong (Live Recordings)
Price: £14.52

4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars There is something special on this album, 26 April 2003
This album is worth buying because it is a great compilation of the Kid A/Amnesiac era - but with a real edge.
"Like Spinning Plates" is absolutely sublime, and this version may now be my favourite radiohead track ever. This track is unbelievably gorgeous... buy the album just for that, even though the other tracks are excellent as well.


A Treatise Concerning The Principles Of Human Knowledge (Oxford Philosophical Texts)
A Treatise Concerning The Principles Of Human Knowledge (Oxford Philosophical Texts)
by George Berkeley
Edition: Paperback
Price: £24.99

9 of 9 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Ideal Idealism, 15 Oct. 2002
This is not the place for a philosophical analysis of Berkeley's original text, and its content of argument. The review concerns the specific book edited by Dancy, and its worth in respect of its further contribution to understanding the Treatise.
This book is to be strongly recommended as it provides a multitude of resources that contextualise, criticise, and clarify, the positions put forward by Berkeley in this work.
The most substantial contribution is the extensive introduction comprised of 15 punchy sections, covering Berkeley's life, his academic heritage, and analysis of his thought (both internal and external to that given in the Treatise). Dancy is fair to Berkeley in setting forth the most robust defences of his position, and marshalling critical arguments against the Berkelian stance. This is supplemented by an extremely thorough set of endnotes that are continually present in the background of the text, offering detailed guidance whenever necessary, or desired.
Additionally, the book offers a summarised concise overview of the arguments provided in the Treatise, a glossary of archaic terms(!), and a very helpful short section entitled "How to use this book" (why don't more books include this sort of thing?). There is also a manageable annotated bibliography of further reading to trail a path for academic expansion.
Overall, I found that this book provided a systematic treatment of the text and provided a solid structure of support surrounding the subject. Also included, the letters between Berkeley and Johnson, provide an unexpected bonus. This book is relatively cheap, considering its breadth and depth. In my opinion, it is an ideal text through which to study (and enjoy) Berkeley's Treatise.


Moral Vision: An Introduction to Ethics
Moral Vision: An Introduction to Ethics
by David McNaughton
Edition: Paperback
Price: £29.99

4 of 5 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Clarity of Vision, 23 Sept. 2002
This book offers an introduction and analysis of meta-ethical theory regarding the source of moral value. The subject of the debate is the non-cognitivism - moral realism debate. If this means nothing to you, or very little, and you are interested in meta-ethics(!) then you would benefit from reading this book. If this is familiar territory, then you will re-read it many times, as I have. Why?
The text is beautifully written, in a lucid style combining rigorously structured argument and vibrant illustration by example. It is clear that the author understands the subject with depth and precision. Respective positions are constructed from their crude (but intuitive) first formulations, and worked-up into defensible sophisticated theory by means of objection. Whilst the discussion is conceptual, and contemporary, it acknowledges the historical basis of its derivation, and its relevance to surrounding literature. This is supplemented through providing helpful further reading lists at the end of each chapter.
This is a book that engages with the reader, so that one feels as if they are participating in the debate themselves. It is rewarding as one experiences a progressive and substantial appreciation of the subject throughout the work.


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