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A Commentary on the Rose Croix Ritual
A Commentary on the Rose Croix Ritual
by Brigadier A.C.F. Jackson
Edition: Paperback

10 of 11 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Well worth the money, 5 April 2005
This booklet is an excellent addition to any freemason's library but will be of most use to the newly perfected mason.
The eighteenth degree, or 'Rose Croix' as it is colloquially known, is the centre point of the 'Ancient and Accepted Rite' , a family of some thirty three degrees. In this small booklet Jackson concentrates on the ritual of the eighteenth degree as practised in the UK.
In Part 1 Jackson briefly outlines the history of the 'Rose Croix' and its connections with the (Masonic) Knights Templear that once controlled the degree in the UK. In Part 2 Jackson comments on the degree ritual shedding a little light on the Opening Ritual, the Red Room, the conferring of the intermediate degrees, The Black Room, the First Point, the C... of D..., The Second Point, the Red Room and the Third Point. In Part 3 Jackson coments on the Enthronement Ceremony.
I doubt that this small booklet will be of much use if the reader is not familiar with the eighteenth degree ritual but it is good as an appetite wetter for the Master Mason thinking about joining the Rose Croix. For the newly perfected mason, wanting to learn a little more about the ritual, this booklet will not disappoint.


The Oxford Companion to Philosophy
The Oxford Companion to Philosophy
by Ted Honderich
Edition: Paperback

14 of 15 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Indispensable for any student of philosophy, 1 Dec. 2004
This is a must have for any student of Philosophy or History of Ideas. This book provides a reliable and comprehensive overview of the central subjects in philosophy and covers both current and historical concerns. There are entries on key philosophers, that give a brief overview of their work and ideas. All entries are clearly written and most of are followed by a list of further reading. If writing for essays, the entries in the can usually be referred to as the contributors are clearly identified by their initials.
'Maps of Philosophy' are included as an appendix, showing the relatedness of different aspects of philosophy and their many theoretical subdivisions. Also included is a chronological table of philosophy outlining the development of philosophy and key events in the same.
This book will be an invaluable resource for anybody undertaking studies for an A-level in philosophy or for a Degree, however anybody interested in philosophy will find 'The Oxford Companion to Philosophy' interesting. Buy this book!


Symbolism in craft freemasonry
Symbolism in craft freemasonry
by Colin F. W Dyer
Edition: Paperback

3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Informative, comprehensive and stimulating, 10 Aug. 2004
Collin Dyer's riveting book is full of information on the symbolism of Craft Freemasonry which will be of interest to the mason and non mason alike. The book discuses the meaning of Masonic symbolism by putting it in an historical context, as such this book will be of interest to anybody interested in the development of speculative Freemasonry. As this book is an academic appraisal of Craft symbolism, there is little here for the idly curious or those looking fore Masonic secrets. Both the newly initiated and the experienced Mason will find this book is stimulating and challenging. By putting the Symbolism in an historical context rather than a mystical or occult one, Dyer is able to treat the subject fairly and reliably, basing his views on verifiable evidence. For all serious students of Freemasonry Collin Dyer's book is a must read.


Jack the Ripper: the Final Solution
Jack the Ripper: the Final Solution
by Stephen Knight
Edition: Mass Market Paperback
Price: £10.99

11 of 19 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars save your money, 19 April 2003
Although 'Jack the Ripper: the Final Solution' adds research to J. G. Sickert's story, much of this is inaccurate. The book's claims of the freemasonic affiliations of the protagonists is almost always wrong. The book is highly speculative as attempts to link with freemasonry with the writing on the wall found at Goulston Street illustrate. The three names in question no longer play a role in English Masonic ritual and were removed from the ceremony in the eighteenth century. Although they are still mentioned in some Scottish and American rituals, it is unlikely that English freemasons would know of them.
The person suggested to be Jack the Ripper by this book had suffered a stroke, this left him paralysed down one side, it is unlikely that could have held a knife, let alone welded it. Although the book's information is at inaccurate, it brings some new evidence to the fore that was not hitherto known. Nevertheless, it is based on a disputed theory for which there seems to be little concrete evidence. However, the book is entertaining if you enjoy reading conspiracy theories.
It would be wise to read the official Masonic rituals (contrary to popular opinion they are not secret and available from Lewis Masonic) or to read 'The Jack the Ripper A-Z' by Paul Begg et al. before making up your mind.
In all, the veracity of this book's findings should be regarded with scepticism. Take my advice, save your money and borrow it from the public library.


Metalogic: An Introduction to the Metatheory of Standard First Order Logic
Metalogic: An Introduction to the Metatheory of Standard First Order Logic
by Hunter
Edition: Paperback
Price: £17.44

6 of 6 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Utterly indispensable, 13 April 2003
Metalogic is an excellent introduction to the metatheory of classical first order logic. It is suitable for students that have undergone, or are undergoing, a first course in standard logic. It discusses, in a non technical way, such results as completeness, consistency, decideability , truth functional adequacy, Church's thesis, Godels theorems, Omega- inconsistency and much more. An indispensable addition to the library of any philosopher or logician.


Jack the Ripper: the Final Solution
Jack the Ripper: the Final Solution
by Stephen Knight
Edition: Mass Market Paperback
Price: £10.99

7 of 15 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Vulgar Journalism, 12 April 2003
This book is heavily dependent on Joseph Gorman Sickert's story of Masonic corruption is Victorian London. The theory is that Prince Albert Victor, heir presumptive to the throne, married a prostitute and had a child by her. As mother and child were catholic this would have caused a constitutional crisis. The theory also maintains that a group of prostitutes were knew of the royal indiscretion and blackmailed the government of the day. However, the Royal Marriages Act states that no marage with a member of the royal family is legal without the monarchs consent. This being so, the marriage would have been annulled and any issue from it declared illegitimate. There would be no constitutional crisis! In any case, the government is unlikely to be concerned with blackmail plot hatched by prostitutes. Those parts of Sickert's story that can be checked empirically have been shown to be false. 'Jack the Ripper: the Final Solution' adds research to the story but unfortunately suffers from the problems mentioned above. The book is inaccurate about the freemasonic affiliations of the protagonists for example, it is alleged that Wynne Baxter was not a Freemason but in fact he was a prominent member of South Sussex Lodge. Again, the Prime Minister Lord Salisbury is alleged to be a Freemason, he wasn't. The best link with freemasonry and the Riper murders is the Goulston Street graffito. It is clamed that the word 'Jewes' reefers to 'Jubelo' 'Jubela' and 'Jubelum', the murders of the Hiram Abi, the mythical architect of King Solomon's temple. However, these names were removed from English Masonic ritual in the eighteenth century so it is unlikely that freemasons of the nineteenth century would know of them. By then, as now, they were simply referred to as 'the three ruffians'. the term 'Jewes' dose not occur in Masonic literature and the graffito is almost certainly the work of an illiterate anti-Semite. This book claims that Sir William Gull, Physician-in-ordinary to Queen Victoria, is Jack the Ripper however, Gull had suffered a stroke that left him paralysed down one side and so could not hold a scalpel. It is unlikely that he could be the infamous Ripper. This book is amateurish, absurd and in my opinion only the extremely gullible will believe its outlandish claims.
Comment Comments (2) | Permalink | Most recent comment: Aug 19, 2012 5:20 PM BST


Logic
Logic
by Wilfrid Hodges
Edition: Paperback
Price: £10.68

12 of 15 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars An excellent introduction to formal logic., 2 Dec. 2002
This review is from: Logic (Paperback)
Presuming no prior knowledge neither of philosophy nor logic, Hodges' book is an excellent, non technical, introduction to the subject. Although some sections of the book are mathematical, these are clearly indicated by the author and may be skipped if the reader wishes, without detriment to the rest of the book. This book presents the classical system of formal logic, introducing the reader to both propositonal and first order predicate calculi. Unlike most introductory texts, this book uses the semantic tree tableau method of deduction which some students find easier to understand than N.D.. Although I find this method a little cumbersome, it has the advantage of translating truth tables to deduction. Hodges the reader through some elementary meta-theory up to the interpolation theorem. The book concludes with a brief outline of some non-clasical logics such as modle logic and tense logic. I would recommend this book to anybody.


Freemasons' Guide and Compendium (General Series)
Freemasons' Guide and Compendium (General Series)
by Bernard E. Jones
Edition: Hardcover

14 of 14 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A book for serious students of freemasonary., 2 Dec. 2002
First published in 1950, this book is a little outdated in places but more than makes up for it in other ways. The book covers, in some detail, the history of the order from medieval operative masons to modern speculative masonry. There is a section on the formation of the Grand Lodges of the 'antients' and the 'moderns' together with details of other rival Grand Lodges operating in the UK at the same time. Jones speculates the origin of the three degree system before going on to discuss each degree in more detail. Jones also discusses other topics of interest such as the working tools, tracing boards, the symbolism of Masonic colours and much more. This book is well written, stimulating and leaves the reader wishing to know more about the Craft. Jones' book is a must have for anybody that seriously wishes to know more about the 'Free and Accepted Masons'.


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