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Mr. Kasper (UK)

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Górecki: Miserere
Górecki: Miserere
Offered by westworld-
Price: £12.31

5.0 out of 5 stars Five Stars, 25 Jan. 2017
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This review is from: Górecki: Miserere (Audio CD)
very good


Minimalist
Minimalist

5.0 out of 5 stars Five Stars, 25 Jan. 2017
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This review is from: Minimalist (Audio CD)
very good


Boulez conducts Debussy & Ravel
Boulez conducts Debussy & Ravel
Offered by mrtopseller
Price: £19.99

1 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Five Stars, 25 Jan. 2017
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
excellent


Routes from the Jungle
Routes from the Jungle

5.0 out of 5 stars Five Stars, 25 Jan. 2017
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This review is from: Routes from the Jungle (Audio CD)
good


Chopin: 26 Preludes
Chopin: 26 Preludes
Price: £7.66

4.0 out of 5 stars Four Stars, 25 Jan. 2017
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This review is from: Chopin: 26 Preludes (Audio CD)
good


Batman: Dark Knight Returns
Batman: Dark Knight Returns
by Frank Miller
Edition: Paperback

7 of 26 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Pioneering Bat-hype, 14 April 2010
Frank Miller was a talented artist who found 'fame' (well, among geeks and 12 year olds) for his makeover of Daredevil. That, like this, hasn't aged well. The 'gritty realism' and attitudes that were so striking to this (then) 12-year old now read like out-takes from T.J. Hooker and Death Wish sequels (but of course featuring guys in tights proving their street-wise machismo in case you question their need to run around in tights). The panel layouts were 'clever', but the drawing itself ugly. Repetitive scenes of various 'unsavouries' (usually 'ethnic') having their heads kicked through windows. Chinless politicians, the obligatory reference to nuclear war (that was the 80s!), and cities entirely populated by muggers (who takes out the rubbish?). And let's. Not mention. That annoying. Pseudo-hardboiled. Short sentence style. That Miller has hacked out for 30 years. Ribs broken. Crushed skull. Etc. Yawn.

It was such a big deal at the time. Wow! Batman may look like a schmuck but now he's like, really serious and deep, yeah? The Joker's a bit gay! Catwoman's a prostitute! At least Adam West and Burt Ward respected it for the nonsense it was. Grown men who think 'films' consists of CGI superhero adaptations, and 'books' are long boring things that you avoided in school, still go ga-ga over this. Indeed, they're so ga-ga that Miller has done what much better comic illustrators never quite managed - making it big in Hollywood! Check the dimwit atrocities that are the Spirit, 300 and Sin City for proof. While your at it, check the 'dark, gritty' Dark Knight movie for the best proof of all. Somehow a movie about a man in a rubber suit chasing a clown around is The Greatest Movie Ever Made amongst those who should really get out more. Comics didn't grow up, movies grew down.

Just for the record, I like comics (even super hero ones - check out Watchmen, All Star Superman or any of Jack Kirby's fun originals) but Frank Miller is a thin talent who's tiny mind and big ego has been given too much of acclaim for too long. But if you like bad cop shows with added costumes, then this is for you.
Comment Comments (2) | Permalink | Most recent comment: May 7, 2010 4:37 PM BST


The Complete Fritz Lang Mabuse Box Set [DVD] [1922]
The Complete Fritz Lang Mabuse Box Set [DVD] [1922]
Dvd ~ Rudolf Klein-Rogge
Offered by bestmediagroup
Price: £12.99

24 of 26 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars More influential than Hitchcock!, 6 Dec. 2009
For anyone interested in the history of film, this set is essential. Since silent days, Lang created the template for science fiction (Metropolis), spies (Spione), serial killers (M), film noir (You Only Live Once) and even renegade cops out for revenge (The Big Heat). To this day, filmakers still use the same character types, styles, motifs and plot devices devised by Lang all those years ago.

With Dr. Mabuse, he basically created the quintessential supervillain of 20th century fiction. Blofeld, The Joker, Darth Vader, Sauron, Dr. Doom, Hannibal Lecter any number of fictional dictators and gangsters - you name them, they probably owe a huge debt to Lang and his all-powerful Doctor. Not least in their uses of technology, political manipulation and 'magic' (hypnosis, 'mind tricks' etc.) for diabolical ends. I defy anyone to watch these films and not detect wholesale plot and character borrowings in The (overrated) Dark Knight (which also stole elements of Lang's 'M'), and James Bond seems to have built a whole franchise from them (especially the weakest of the three, 'Thousand Eyes').

More influential than Hitchcock? Well, Lang's influence in so many genres means that his methods haven't dated as much as the master of suspense. The stylistic gimmicks and cod-Freudianism that mar many a Hitchcock thriller are largely absent here. Lang was politically savvy enough to know that character is as much a product of the landscape (political, architectural, technological) as personal relationships. Lang's stylistic innovations are now so commonplace that they don't appear as kitsch as Hitch. In foregrounding the external factors at play, he arguably had a better grasp of the paranoia, surrealism and political horrors of the twentieth century than most of his Hollywood peers. All three deal with the key terrors of German political life - 'The Gambler' with the chaos of Weimar, 'The Testament' with the imminent mob manipulations and mega-crimes of Nazism, and 'Thousand Eyes' with cold war paranoia. Even if you tend to switch off at the pacing and acting of silent/early talkie films, you may be surprised at how modern these films seem today.


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