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Peter Lee (Manchester ,United Kingdom)

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Boys Don't Cry: Why I hid my depression and why men need to talk about their mental health
Boys Don't Cry: Why I hid my depression and why men need to talk about their mental health
by Tim Grayburn
Edition: Hardcover
Price: £12.53

3.0 out of 5 stars A book about a show, and therefore disappointing, 18 Oct. 2017
Customer review from the Amazon Vine Programme (What's this?)
A year or so ago I read Matt Haig's "Reasons to Stay Alive", which was his account of dealing with anxiety and depression. It was a superb book, and I hoped that this would be similar, and the reviews certainly indicated that it was a good book.

Tim is in his early to mid thirties and has suffered from depression for many years. The book is his candid account of his life, descent into depression and suicidal feelings, and how he dealt with it. It's not a self-help book, nor is it an academic tome - it's short (just over 200 pages, with large text) and written in a friendly, chatty style.

But... it didn't really work for me. I didn't really feel his pain as I read it, and aside from mentioning that he cried a lot and often drew pictures of the grim reaper his depression never really came over to me, unlike Matt Haig's book. Most of the book also seemed to be given over to the story of how he and his partner wrote and performed a successful show about his depression and then took it around the world, winning a number of awards, and for a long while it felt as though it was a book about touring and performing the show. Only the final chapter really dealt with how he coped with his depression (watch what you eat, get exercise - the usual advice really, nothing ground breaking) and the main guidance seemed to be if possible you should write and perform a successful show. Personally, the afterword at the end - a series of emails Tim received from people who had seen the show - felt like padding and didn't move me, unlike another reviewer.

All in all it didn't really feel like a book about depression and how Tim dealt with it, but it was a memoir about being a man and performing a stage show. Reasonably enjoyable in a strange way, but not the book I'd hoped it would be. The Matt Haig book is far, far better than this.


Death Knocks Twice
Death Knocks Twice
by Robert Thorogood
Edition: Paperback
Price: £6.29

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Disappointing compared to the previous books and the show, 11 Oct. 2017
This review is from: Death Knocks Twice (Paperback)
Customer review from the Amazon Vine Programme (What's this?)
I'm a fan of the TV series and really enjoyed the previous two books, but this is a disappointment.

As with the show, the story is a murder mystery. A body is found in a plantation and the theory is that it was suicide rather than murder, but DI Richard Poole (the character played by Ben Miller in the earlier series) suspects foul play despite the evidence pointing towards suicide. When a second body turns up it becomes clear that something more sinister is afoot.

For me, the book lacked the fun of the previous two, and I found it quite tedious in parts, to the point that I felt almost as if I'd never finish it. It's not a bad book, but it missed that certain something that its predecessors had - maybe it was in need of more editing, or a tighter plot? As others have also noticed I found the repetition of the phrase "what's that?" to be distracting - if you had to have a drink each time someone uttered those words you'd be a wreck, as one page had three or four instances of it for example!

All in all it was merely OK. Not a patch on the series or the previous two books I'm afraid.


Everybody's Fool
Everybody's Fool
Price: £5.69

4.0 out of 5 stars Good, but not up to his usual standard, 20 Sept. 2017
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This review is from: Everybody's Fool (Kindle Edition)
I'm a huge fan of Richard Russo's work and was really looking forward to this, his first novel in years. It's a kind of sequel to "Nobody's Fool" as some of the characters from the earlier book return here and it is set in the same town, but you don't have to have read the previous book to enjoy this. As usual with Russo it's an ensemble piece, with lots of characters going about their lives in a small, run-down town, and there are moments of humour alongside others of sadness, and the whole thing hurries along. The pace was unusual for Russo as the story is set over a weekend, and I wished it could have been set over a longer time frame as it did feel a little rushed and we couldn't see how things really developed. Thoroughly enjoyable, and not a great novel by Russo, but good and enjoyable all the same.


Not Dead Yet: The Autobiography
Not Dead Yet: The Autobiography
Price: £4.99

2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Surprisingly good!, 20 Sept. 2017
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
It's funny, but I read this book just after I'd read Grace Jones's rather dull autobiography. Phil's book was far superior! I'm not a huge fan of the guy or his music, but this was entertaining from the off and maintained the standard throughout, and above all else it's incredibly honest and he tells his story warts and all. Great fun, and surprisingly so!


I'll Never Write My Memoirs
I'll Never Write My Memoirs
Price: £5.99

3.0 out of 5 stars Surprisingly dull, 20 Sept. 2017
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
Considering this is the autobiography (albeit ghostwritten by Paul Morley) of Grace Jones I found this to be very dull. I'd expected shocks, outrageous behaviour, and humour, but in all honesty it was actually quite boring. Sorry!


Building the Agile Database: How to Build a Successful Application Using Agile Without Sacrificing Data Management
Building the Agile Database: How to Build a Successful Application Using Agile Without Sacrificing Data Management
by Larry Burns
Edition: Paperback
Price: £38.54

3.0 out of 5 stars Disappointing, 20 Sept. 2017
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
Disappointing I'm afraid. I've worked with SQL databases for almost twenty years now, and Agile for about a year, and I expected more from this book. Unfortunately most of the observations it offered were blindingly obvious (certainly to me at least) and it felt like a waste of money. Lots of people seem to like it though, so maybe I'd just set my expectations too high.


Braun 92B Series 9 Electric Shaver Replacement Foil and Cassette Cartridge - Black
Braun 92B Series 9 Electric Shaver Replacement Foil and Cassette Cartridge - Black
Offered by F7 Direct
Price: £49.93

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Makes your series 9 shaver feel like new again, 20 Sept. 2017
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
Got a Braun series 9 shaver? Not cutting as well as it used to? Braun advise that you change the heads every eighteen months, but as I use my shaver at least once a day I tend to switch mine yearly. Yes, it's expensive, but it lasts a year or more. Easy to fit - just push the two buttons on the sides of the head on your shaver to release the old head, and snap the new one in its place - and you've got another year of decent shaves ahead of you.


How to Stop Time
How to Stop Time
Price: £4.74

0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Loved it!, 20 Sept. 2017
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This review is from: How to Stop Time (Kindle Edition)
I loved this book. The premise is unusual: Tom is a schoolteacher and appears to be in his early 40s, but in fact he is over 400 years old. Due to a rare medical condition he ages incredibly slowly, and in order to hide his secret he is encouraged to change his identity every few years and move elsewhere, and the one thing he must never do is fall in love.

The book tells Tom's story and the chapters alternate between his past and his present. We see him with a cast of characters from the history books, travelling the world, until he settles down as a history teacher in a London school where his experiences allow him to make the subject come alive.

Saying more about the story would lead to spoilers, so I'll leave it there. It's a lovely book, full of wonderful observations about life and love - the kind of book you want to read bits out to people close to you - and as well as giving a bit of a rosy glow it's funny, exciting, and the pages fly by.


Little Boy Found: A Psychological Thriller Unlike Anything You've Read Before!
Little Boy Found: A Psychological Thriller Unlike Anything You've Read Before!
Price: £0.99

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Really disappointing, 18 Sept. 2017
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I'm sorry to say I really didn't enjoy this. LK Fox is a pseudonym used by Christopher Fowler, of whose books I've been a huge fan over the years, but this wasn't a great read. The story follows two characters, Nick and Ella, in seemingly unrelated stories, alternating between the two. If you're read Fowler's "Frightening" short story collection you'll notice strong parallels between its story "The Baby" and one of the threads here, and I found this to be very distracting until it eventually veered away from the original tale. Ultimately though I found "Little Boy Found" eventually became far-fetched and rather silly, and the shock ending jarred. Sorry, Christopher - this wasn't great.


Holding
Holding
Price: £3.99

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars A promising debut, 18 Sept. 2017
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This review is from: Holding (Kindle Edition)
If you're expecting Graham Norton's cheeky humour, you'll be disappointed. "Holding" is the story of a small village in Ireland, the people who live there, and the discovery of a skeleton during excavation work for a housing development. Whose skeleton is it? How did it get there? Who killed them?

Much of the book follows the village's overweight policeman as he investigates, along with a slicker policeman sent from the city, but is all as it seems? We meet some strange folk in the village, and around the halfway mark there's a twist...

It's an enjoyable book, and well written throughout. I did find it a bit dull at the start, and my wife found the ending disappointing when she read it (I thought it was fine) but it's a decent start by Graham Norton as a novelist.


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