Shop now Shop now Shop now Cloud Drive Photos Shop now Learn More Shop now Shop now Shop Fire Shop Kindle Shop now Shop now
Profile for Andrew McKirgan > Reviews

Personal Profile

Content by Andrew McKirgan
Top Reviewer Ranking: 8,004,449
Helpful Votes: 14

Learn more about Your Profile.

Reviews Written by
Andrew McKirgan (UK)

Show:  
Page: 1
pixel
An Economic History of Twentieth-Century Europe: Economic Regimes from Laissez-Faire to Globalization
An Economic History of Twentieth-Century Europe: Economic Regimes from Laissez-Faire to Globalization
by Ivan T. Berend
Edition: Paperback
Price: £24.99

3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars The title delivers what it says, 5 Sept. 2010
You could not have a less ambiguous title and this book certainly delivers on that title. It is well structured, clearly written and makes extensive use of statistics throughout.

It is largely chronological but there are obviously overlaps between certain themes. It begins with the laissez-faire legacy of the 19th Century, followed by the regulated market of the inter-war years. It moves onto the fascist and quasi-fascist regimes and then the communist regimes. The last chapters are on the mixed economies of western Europe and then the globalised free market ideology of the late 20th Century. The chapters on these themes are interspersed with short case studies. These cover such things as products, companies and indivuals.

Each of the themes compares and contrasts how the different regimes approached economics and economic policy. The author remains objective and does not seem to be pushing any particulary ideology of his own. This leaves the readers free to draw their own conclusions on the merit or otherwise of the economic approach of the different regimes discussed.

This is not an introductory text. A knowledge of economics and 20th Century European history is required before beginning it.

A downside of the book is the poorly designed graphs that appear throughout. These are not even consistent in their badness. The author would be well advised to read some of the works of Stephen Few.


The Discovery of Mankind: Atlantic Encounters in the Age of Columbus
The Discovery of Mankind: Atlantic Encounters in the Age of Columbus
by David Abulafia
Edition: Paperback
Price: £18.00

4 of 5 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A thorough and engaging book, 30 Jan. 2010
The book claims to show how the European discovery of different lands and peoples changed ideas and beliefs. It certainly succeeds at this. However, it is also a very good narrative history. Its arguments are also put into the wider context which means that it is possible to follow these arguments with the minimum of prior knowledge on this interesting topic.


Successful Business Intelligence: Secrets to Making BI a Killer App
Successful Business Intelligence: Secrets to Making BI a Killer App
by Cindi Howson
Edition: Hardcover

7 of 7 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A practical guide to implementing business intelligence, 25 May 2009
There are many books on the market which tell you how to design and implement the technology to support business intelligence. This book is not one of them. Rather, it is a rarer and more important book which tells you about why business intelligence is needed and how it should work in your organisation.

Too much of the literature available concentrates on the technology and sidelines the important issue of business intelligence, i.e., providing information which can be used to make decisions. Certainly, the technology is covered in the book but it is always placed in the wider context.

The recommendations in the book are based on primary research conducted by the author as well as her own personal experience. This gives the advice more authenticity than it being based purely on academic theory or the self-interest of particular software firms.

The weakness of the book (and why I've only given it four stars) is that, where there is discussion of software tools, it is very much about the current versions. This, I feel, will make it appear out-dated quite quickly. However, this should be no reason for not reading it.


Page: 1