Profile for Keen Reader > Reviews

Personal Profile

Content by Keen Reader
Top Reviewer Ranking: 38
Helpful Votes: 3770

Learn more about Your Profile.

Reviews Written by
Keen Reader "lhendry4" (Auckland, New Zealand)
(TOP 50 REVIEWER)   

Show:  
Page: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11-20
pixel
Blood On The Strand: 2: Chaloner's Second Exploit in Restoration London (Exploits of Thomas Chaloner) by Susanna Gregory (24-Jan-2008) Paperback
Blood On The Strand: 2: Chaloner's Second Exploit in Restoration London (Exploits of Thomas Chaloner) by Susanna Gregory (24-Jan-2008) Paperback
by Susanna Gregory
Edition: Paperback

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Blood on the Strand, 27 July 2015
This is the second in the Thomas Chaloner mystery series, another series by the author of the marvellous Matthew Bartholemew series. Thomas Chaloner lives in Restoration England, and at the time of this story London is celebrating (although it seems only the courtiers still want to show their appreciation of the King) the third anniversary of the Restoration of King Charles II to the throne. Chaloner has been hired to keep an eye on the arrival of the procession at Westminster Abbey, and his investigation into an apparent vagrant outside the Abbey ends badly. In the meantime, there are questions about the death of a wealthy merchant, Matthew Webb who is killed outside his home one night after returning from a Guinea Company dinner. Chaloner finds himself caught up in Court intrigue, espionage, skullduggery, jealousy, betrayal and murder, and quickly feels he is well out of his depth in the London he no longer recognises.

This is another great story featuring Thomas Chaloner. In this second story, I felt that we had learned a bit more about Chaloner, and understood his character better. He is a good man trying to find his way in a world he doesn’t really understand any more, but he wants at the same time to see justice done, and to protect his friends. His relationship with the ex-Spymaster Thurloe is strong, but Chaloner never really knows who he can trust; and in Restoration London, trusting the wrong person could be fatal.

I thoroughly enjoyed this story; the characters are well drawn, the mysteries are complex and intriguing, the ‘feel’ of seventeenth century London and the strong political and religious feelings of those who live and work there are very well presented. Chaloner is a character who is well realised, and I look forward to the next story in the series, The Butcher of Smithfield.


By Susanna Gregory - Blood on The Strand Chaloner's Second Exploit in Restoration London by Gregory, Susanna ( Author ) ON Jan-24-2008, Paperback
By Susanna Gregory - Blood on The Strand Chaloner's Second Exploit in Restoration London by Gregory, Susanna ( Author ) ON Jan-24-2008, Paperback
by Susanna Gregory
Edition: Paperback

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Blood on the Strand, 27 July 2015
This is the second in the Thomas Chaloner mystery series, another series by the author of the marvellous Matthew Bartholemew series. Thomas Chaloner lives in Restoration England, and at the time of this story London is celebrating (although it seems only the courtiers still want to show their appreciation of the King) the third anniversary of the Restoration of King Charles II to the throne. Chaloner has been hired to keep an eye on the arrival of the procession at Westminster Abbey, and his investigation into an apparent vagrant outside the Abbey ends badly. In the meantime, there are questions about the death of a wealthy merchant, Matthew Webb who is killed outside his home one night after returning from a Guinea Company dinner. Chaloner finds himself caught up in Court intrigue, espionage, skullduggery, jealousy, betrayal and murder, and quickly feels he is well out of his depth in the London he no longer recognises.

This is another great story featuring Thomas Chaloner. In this second story, I felt that we had learned a bit more about Chaloner, and understood his character better. He is a good man trying to find his way in a world he doesn’t really understand any more, but he wants at the same time to see justice done, and to protect his friends. His relationship with the ex-Spymaster Thurloe is strong, but Chaloner never really knows who he can trust; and in Restoration London, trusting the wrong person could be fatal.

I thoroughly enjoyed this story; the characters are well drawn, the mysteries are complex and intriguing, the ‘feel’ of seventeenth century London and the strong political and religious feelings of those who live and work there are very well presented. Chaloner is a character who is well realised, and I look forward to the next story in the series, The Butcher of Smithfield.


Blood On The Strand: 2: Chaloner's Second Exploit in Restoration London (Exploits of Thomas Chaloner) by Gregory. Susanna ( 2008 ) Paperback
Blood On The Strand: 2: Chaloner's Second Exploit in Restoration London (Exploits of Thomas Chaloner) by Gregory. Susanna ( 2008 ) Paperback

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Blood on the Strand, 27 July 2015
This is the second in the Thomas Chaloner mystery series, another series by the author of the marvellous Matthew Bartholemew series. Thomas Chaloner lives in Restoration England, and at the time of this story London is celebrating (although it seems only the courtiers still want to show their appreciation of the King) the third anniversary of the Restoration of King Charles II to the throne. Chaloner has been hired to keep an eye on the arrival of the procession at Westminster Abbey, and his investigation into an apparent vagrant outside the Abbey ends badly. In the meantime, there are questions about the death of a wealthy merchant, Matthew Webb who is killed outside his home one night after returning from a Guinea Company dinner. Chaloner finds himself caught up in Court intrigue, espionage, skullduggery, jealousy, betrayal and murder, and quickly feels he is well out of his depth in the London he no longer recognises.

This is another great story featuring Thomas Chaloner. In this second story, I felt that we had learned a bit more about Chaloner, and understood his character better. He is a good man trying to find his way in a world he doesn’t really understand any more, but he wants at the same time to see justice done, and to protect his friends. His relationship with the ex-Spymaster Thurloe is strong, but Chaloner never really knows who he can trust; and in Restoration London, trusting the wrong person could be fatal.

I thoroughly enjoyed this story; the characters are well drawn, the mysteries are complex and intriguing, the ‘feel’ of seventeenth century London and the strong political and religious feelings of those who live and work there are very well presented. Chaloner is a character who is well realised, and I look forward to the next story in the series, The Butcher of Smithfield.


Blood On The Strand: 2: Chaloner's Second Exploit in Restoration London (Exploits of Thomas Chaloner)
Blood On The Strand: 2: Chaloner's Second Exploit in Restoration London (Exploits of Thomas Chaloner)
by Susanna Gregory
Edition: Paperback
Price: £9.99

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Blood on the Strand, 27 July 2015
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This is the second in the Thomas Chaloner mystery series, another series by the author of the marvellous Matthew Bartholemew series. Thomas Chaloner lives in Restoration England, and at the time of this story London is celebrating (although it seems only the courtiers still want to show their appreciation of the King) the third anniversary of the Restoration of King Charles II to the throne. Chaloner has been hired to keep an eye on the arrival of the procession at Westminster Abbey, and his investigation into an apparent vagrant outside the Abbey ends badly. In the meantime, there are questions about the death of a wealthy merchant, Matthew Webb who is killed outside his home one night after returning from a Guinea Company dinner. Chaloner finds himself caught up in Court intrigue, espionage, skullduggery, jealousy, betrayal and murder, and quickly feels he is well out of his depth in the London he no longer recognises.

This is another great story featuring Thomas Chaloner. In this second story, I felt that we had learned a bit more about Chaloner, and understood his character better. He is a good man trying to find his way in a world he doesn’t really understand any more, but he wants at the same time to see justice done, and to protect his friends. His relationship with the ex-Spymaster Thurloe is strong, but Chaloner never really knows who he can trust; and in Restoration London, trusting the wrong person could be fatal.

I thoroughly enjoyed this story; the characters are well drawn, the mysteries are complex and intriguing, the ‘feel’ of seventeenth century London and the strong political and religious feelings of those who live and work there are very well presented. Chaloner is a character who is well realised, and I look forward to the next story in the series, The Butcher of Smithfield.


Persuasion (Doctor Who): Written by Jonathan Barnes, 2013 Edition, Publisher: Big Finish Productions Ltd [Audio CD]
Persuasion (Doctor Who): Written by Jonathan Barnes, 2013 Edition, Publisher: Big Finish Productions Ltd [Audio CD]
by Jonathan Barnes
Edition: Audio CD

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Persuasion, 27 July 2015
This is the 175th release in the Main Range by Big Finish, and the first in a trilogy featuring the Seventh Doctor and Elizabeth Klein. The remaining two stories in the trilogy are ‘Starlight Robbery’ and ‘Daleks Among Us’.

Two voices, speaking with an ‘otherworldly’ quality in tone and speech patterns, discuss their grief at the life they now seem to be doomed to endure. Their servant, the Sylph, is distressed at the inability of the Lord and the Lady to live as they should. Meanwhile, Elizabeth Klein, UNIT’s Scientific Adviser is having a meeting out of the office with her assistant Will Arrowsmith, when Will spots The Umbrella Man. Sending Will back to report to the office, Klein follows the Doctor. But Will, wanting to prove his worth to UNIT, follows them into the Tardis. Travelling to Dusseldorth in 1945, the Doctor seems to be leading Klein towards something; but does he really know more than he is letting on? And what will he do when he finds that Will has followed them? The Doctor is feeling his years, but is he still playing games? Klein knows the Doctor of old; but is she, or he the same as they were in those other meetings?

There is a great cast in this story. Paul Chahidi plays the Shpeherd, and Bondsman Tango-Veldt; Miranda Raison plays the Shepherdess and Acquisitor Prime. I thought they stood out in the cast as the parts that were very well written, and that were played by them both with great depth and character. Gemma Whelan does a great job as Castra, the Sylph and the Khlecht voice. David Sibley plays Kurt Schalk, a very cold and driven scientist, and Jonathan Forbes is very good as his colleage Lukas Hinterberger. Christian Edwards plays Will Arrowsmith very well, as a rather goofy and earnest young man who tries his best at being what he believes he ought to be. And Tracey Childs reprises the role of Elizabeth Klein admirably. Sylvester McCoy is playing the dark and devious, manipulative Seventh Doctor, and it is really hard to pin down just how much he may or may not know in this story, and whether he has any idea what may happen next. The story ends at the end of one part of the journey, and very much on the way to the next part of the journey. Where it will all end, we wait to find out.

This is a story that very much sets the scene for the remaining two stories in the trilogy. The end of this story is by no means a resolution in itself; while one door of a part of the story seems to be closing, many more are opening up. Listening to the interviews after the end of the second cd, Jonathan Barnes who wrote ‘Persuasion’ is very clear that his story sets up many threads which are followed in the next two stories. I think final judgment on this story must wait until the next two are heard. This story is hugely enjoyable in so far as it goes; whether it is successful in the trilogy as a whole will need to be considered after those two have been heard.


Persuasion (Doctor Who) by Barnes. Jonathan ( 2013 ) Audio CD
Persuasion (Doctor Who) by Barnes. Jonathan ( 2013 ) Audio CD
by Jonathan Barnes
Edition: Audio CD

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Persuasion, 27 July 2015
This is the 175th release in the Main Range by Big Finish, and the first in a trilogy featuring the Seventh Doctor and Elizabeth Klein. The remaining two stories in the trilogy are ‘Starlight Robbery’ and ‘Daleks Among Us’.

Two voices, speaking with an ‘otherworldly’ quality in tone and speech patterns, discuss their grief at the life they now seem to be doomed to endure. Their servant, the Sylph, is distressed at the inability of the Lord and the Lady to live as they should. Meanwhile, Elizabeth Klein, UNIT’s Scientific Adviser is having a meeting out of the office with her assistant Will Arrowsmith, when Will spots The Umbrella Man. Sending Will back to report to the office, Klein follows the Doctor. But Will, wanting to prove his worth to UNIT, follows them into the Tardis. Travelling to Dusseldorth in 1945, the Doctor seems to be leading Klein towards something; but does he really know more than he is letting on? And what will he do when he finds that Will has followed them? The Doctor is feeling his years, but is he still playing games? Klein knows the Doctor of old; but is she, or he the same as they were in those other meetings?

There is a great cast in this story. Paul Chahidi plays the Shpeherd, and Bondsman Tango-Veldt; Miranda Raison plays the Shepherdess and Acquisitor Prime. I thought they stood out in the cast as the parts that were very well written, and that were played by them both with great depth and character. Gemma Whelan does a great job as Castra, the Sylph and the Khlecht voice. David Sibley plays Kurt Schalk, a very cold and driven scientist, and Jonathan Forbes is very good as his colleage Lukas Hinterberger. Christian Edwards plays Will Arrowsmith very well, as a rather goofy and earnest young man who tries his best at being what he believes he ought to be. And Tracey Childs reprises the role of Elizabeth Klein admirably. Sylvester McCoy is playing the dark and devious, manipulative Seventh Doctor, and it is really hard to pin down just how much he may or may not know in this story, and whether he has any idea what may happen next. The story ends at the end of one part of the journey, and very much on the way to the next part of the journey. Where it will all end, we wait to find out.

This is a story that very much sets the scene for the remaining two stories in the trilogy. The end of this story is by no means a resolution in itself; while one door of a part of the story seems to be closing, many more are opening up. Listening to the interviews after the end of the second cd, Jonathan Barnes who wrote ‘Persuasion’ is very clear that his story sets up many threads which are followed in the next two stories. I think final judgment on this story must wait until the next two are heard. This story is hugely enjoyable in so far as it goes; whether it is successful in the trilogy as a whole will need to be considered after those two have been heard.


Persuasion (Doctor Who)
Persuasion (Doctor Who)
by Jonathan Barnes
Edition: Audio CD
Price: £14.99

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Persuasion, 27 July 2015
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This review is from: Persuasion (Doctor Who) (Audio CD)
This is the 175th release in the Main Range by Big Finish, and the first in a trilogy featuring the Seventh Doctor and Elizabeth Klein. The remaining two stories in the trilogy are ‘Starlight Robbery’ and ‘Daleks Among Us’.

Two voices, speaking with an ‘otherworldly’ quality in tone and speech patterns, discuss their grief at the life they now seem to be doomed to endure. Their servant, the Sylph, is distressed at the inability of the Lord and the Lady to live as they should. Meanwhile, Elizabeth Klein, UNIT’s Scientific Adviser is having a meeting out of the office with her assistant Will Arrowsmith, when Will spots The Umbrella Man. Sending Will back to report to the office, Klein follows the Doctor. But Will, wanting to prove his worth to UNIT, follows them into the Tardis. Travelling to Dusseldorth in 1945, the Doctor seems to be leading Klein towards something; but does he really know more than he is letting on? And what will he do when he finds that Will has followed them? The Doctor is feeling his years, but is he still playing games? Klein knows the Doctor of old; but is she, or he the same as they were in those other meetings?

There is a great cast in this story. Paul Chahidi plays the Shpeherd, and Bondsman Tango-Veldt; Miranda Raison plays the Shepherdess and Acquisitor Prime. I thought they stood out in the cast as the parts that were very well written, and that were played by them both with great depth and character. Gemma Whelan does a great job as Castra, the Sylph and the Khlecht voice. David Sibley plays Kurt Schalk, a very cold and driven scientist, and Jonathan Forbes is very good as his colleage Lukas Hinterberger. Christian Edwards plays Will Arrowsmith very well, as a rather goofy and earnest young man who tries his best at being what he believes he ought to be. And Tracey Childs reprises the role of Elizabeth Klein admirably. Sylvester McCoy is playing the dark and devious, manipulative Seventh Doctor, and it is really hard to pin down just how much he may or may not know in this story, and whether he has any idea what may happen next. The story ends at the end of one part of the journey, and very much on the way to the next part of the journey. Where it will all end, we wait to find out.

This is a story that very much sets the scene for the remaining two stories in the trilogy. The end of this story is by no means a resolution in itself; while one door of a part of the story seems to be closing, many more are opening up. Listening to the interviews after the end of the second cd, Jonathan Barnes who wrote ‘Persuasion’ is very clear that his story sets up many threads which are followed in the next two stories. I think final judgment on this story must wait until the next two are heard. This story is hugely enjoyable in so far as it goes; whether it is successful in the trilogy as a whole will need to be considered after those two have been heard.
Comment Comment (1) | Permalink | Most recent comment: Jul 28, 2015 8:03 AM BST


Seal of the Worm (Shadows of the Apt) by Adrian Tchaikovsky (4-Dec-2014) Paperback
Seal of the Worm (Shadows of the Apt) by Adrian Tchaikovsky (4-Dec-2014) Paperback
by Adrian Tchaikovsky
Edition: Paperback

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Seal of the Worm, 25 July 2015
This is the tenth and final book in the ten-book series, Shadows of the Apt. The series started with the first book being published in 2008, and the author has been publishing the astonishingly accomplished further books in the series since.

When I started reading the series, I had no idea it was going to be a whole ten books. If I had known, maybe I would have thought twice about starting. But I’m glad that wasn’t the case, because if I hadn’t starting reading the series, I would have missed out on one heck of a reading experience. These books are absolutely mind-blowing fantasy novels. I cannot think of any other series, or book that I have ever read that you could truly compare these to. The world-building, the characters and their development, the situations, the whole cultural, political, societal aspects of these books are utterly unique.

At the end of the ninth book (War-Master’s Gate) the world had changed. The Seal of the Worm had been shattered, and what emerged was something nobody could ever have envisaged having to face. Che and Seda have faced up to the powers that they both carry, and the result has been potentially catastrophic. And with Collegium and the other powers still falling to the Wasp Empire’s military might, what hope can there be for the world at all?

This was an absolutely stunning read. I found myself desperate to know what happened, not only to the world as a whole, but to so many of the individual characters who have been introduced throughout the series, and whose lives we can now take so personally. I found, too, that you didn’t want one side or the other to win. Both sides had people who deserved to live, whose lives had been lived morally and ethically and for whom I felt a lot of empathy – Tynan, for example.

It’s a sad, bittersweet book, which ties up many of the threads of the world and its peoples, but which leaves opportunities for futures for so many. Many have been lost in the struggles that we have read about over these ten books, but many were redeemed. I had been really worrying about the ultimate fate of many of the characters, and how the ‘truths’ of their lives could be honoured, and I really felt that the conclusions were fitting – one could almost say (pun intended) apt.


[(The Seal of the Worm)] [ By (author) Adrian Tchaikovsky ] [October, 2014]
[(The Seal of the Worm)] [ By (author) Adrian Tchaikovsky ] [October, 2014]
by Adrian Tchaikovsky
Edition: Paperback

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Seal of the Worm, 25 July 2015
This is the tenth and final book in the ten-book series, Shadows of the Apt. The series started with the first book being published in 2008, and the author has been publishing the astonishingly accomplished further books in the series since.

When I started reading the series, I had no idea it was going to be a whole ten books. If I had known, maybe I would have thought twice about starting. But I’m glad that wasn’t the case, because if I hadn’t starting reading the series, I would have missed out on one heck of a reading experience. These books are absolutely mind-blowing fantasy novels. I cannot think of any other series, or book that I have ever read that you could truly compare these to. The world-building, the characters and their development, the situations, the whole cultural, political, societal aspects of these books are utterly unique.

At the end of the ninth book (War-Master’s Gate) the world had changed. The Seal of the Worm had been shattered, and what emerged was something nobody could ever have envisaged having to face. Che and Seda have faced up to the powers that they both carry, and the result has been potentially catastrophic. And with Collegium and the other powers still falling to the Wasp Empire’s military might, what hope can there be for the world at all?

This was an absolutely stunning read. I found myself desperate to know what happened, not only to the world as a whole, but to so many of the individual characters who have been introduced throughout the series, and whose lives we can now take so personally. I found, too, that you didn’t want one side or the other to win. Both sides had people who deserved to live, whose lives had been lived morally and ethically and for whom I felt a lot of empathy – Tynan, for example.

It’s a sad, bittersweet book, which ties up many of the threads of the world and its peoples, but which leaves opportunities for futures for so many. Many have been lost in the struggles that we have read about over these ten books, but many were redeemed. I had been really worrying about the ultimate fate of many of the characters, and how the ‘truths’ of their lives could be honoured, and I really felt that the conclusions were fitting – one could almost say (pun intended) apt.


Seal of the Worm (Shadows of the Apt)
Seal of the Worm (Shadows of the Apt)
by Adrian Tchaikovsky
Edition: Paperback
Price: £7.19

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Seal of the Worm, 25 July 2015
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This is the tenth and final book in the ten-book series, Shadows of the Apt. The series started with the first book being published in 2008, and the author has been publishing the astonishingly accomplished further books in the series since.

When I started reading the series, I had no idea it was going to be a whole ten books. If I had known, maybe I would have thought twice about starting. But I’m glad that wasn’t the case, because if I hadn’t starting reading the series, I would have missed out on one heck of a reading experience. These books are absolutely mind-blowing fantasy novels. I cannot think of any other series, or book that I have ever read that you could truly compare these to. The world-building, the characters and their development, the situations, the whole cultural, political, societal aspects of these books are utterly unique.

At the end of the ninth book (War-Master’s Gate) the world had changed. The Seal of the Worm had been shattered, and what emerged was something nobody could ever have envisaged having to face. Che and Seda have faced up to the powers that they both carry, and the result has been potentially catastrophic. And with Collegium and the other powers still falling to the Wasp Empire’s military might, what hope can there be for the world at all?

This was an absolutely stunning read. I found myself desperate to know what happened, not only to the world as a whole, but to so many of the individual characters who have been introduced throughout the series, and whose lives we can now take so personally. I found, too, that you didn’t want one side or the other to win. Both sides had people who deserved to live, whose lives had been lived morally and ethically and for whom I felt a lot of empathy – Tynan, for example.

It’s a sad, bittersweet book, which ties up many of the threads of the world and its peoples, but which leaves opportunities for futures for so many. Many have been lost in the struggles that we have read about over these ten books, but many were redeemed. I had been really worrying about the ultimate fate of many of the characters, and how the ‘truths’ of their lives could be honoured, and I really felt that the conclusions were fitting – one could almost say (pun intended) apt.


Page: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11-20