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Watch the Lady Ome
Watch the Lady Ome
by Elizabeth Fremantle
Edition: Paperback
Price: £12.99

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Watch the Lady, 4 July 2015
This review is from: Watch the Lady Ome (Paperback)
I have read ‘Queen’s Gambit’ and ‘Sisters of Treason’ by Elizabeth Fremantle, and thoroughly enjoyed them. So I was looking forward to reading this new novel of hers, and was not disappointed.

The story told in this book is that of Lady Penelope Devereux. She is a woman who seems most often to be offered to readers of historical fiction or non-fiction through the actions and motivations of those around her.

Penelope was the daughter of Lettice Knollys and Walter Devereux, Viscount Hereford. Lettice was a grand-niece of Queen Elizabeth through Anne Boleyn’s sister Mary. Hereford became the 1st Earl of Essex in 1572, but died in 1576 while in Ireland on the Queen’s military business.

Penelope was the sister of Robert Devereux, 2nd Earl of Essex, who became the Queen’s favourite and was to have an influence on the political and military world of the latter part of the Queen’s reign.

Penelope’s mother Lettice had been close to the Queen, but was banished from Court and outcast by the Queen on secretly marrying Robert Dudley, Earl of Leicester in 1578.

Penelope was also the muse of the great Elizabethan courtier and poet Philip Sidney; she was the wife of Robert Rich, 3rd Baron Rich (later 1st Earl of Warwick); and she was the mistress and later wife of Christopher Blount, Baron Mountjoy (later 1st Earl of Devonshire). She was a lady of Queen Elizabeth’s court. Those of her family, and those with whom she associated were an integral part of the Elizabethan political and cultural landscape in the second half of the Queen’s long reign.

There is therefore plenty of material with which to work, in telling a historical narrative of Penelope’s life, and the author has very successfully done so. There are, of course, some slight historical ‘fudgings’ of facts and it may be a little fanciful to be a strict historical telling of the years 1581 to 1603, but it is a highly readable and deligtfully engaging historical novel. I found it fascinating to read a narrative of Penelope Devereux in which she is the focal character, and to see those years pass as from her perspective. This is a highly recommended historical novel, as are all of the author’s works; they are all very enjoyable reads.


Watch the Lady
Watch the Lady
by Elizabeth Fremantle
Edition: Hardcover
Price: £12.99

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Watch the Lady, 4 July 2015
This review is from: Watch the Lady (Hardcover)
I have read ‘Queen’s Gambit’ and ‘Sisters of Treason’ by Elizabeth Fremantle, and thoroughly enjoyed them. So I was looking forward to reading this new novel of hers, and was not disappointed.

The story told in this book is that of Lady Penelope Devereux. She is a woman who seems most often to be offered to readers of historical fiction or non-fiction through the actions and motivations of those around her.

Penelope was the daughter of Lettice Knollys and Walter Devereux, Viscount Hereford. Lettice was a grand-niece of Queen Elizabeth through Anne Boleyn’s sister Mary. Hereford became the 1st Earl of Essex in 1572, but died in 1576 while in Ireland on the Queen’s military business.

Penelope was the sister of Robert Devereux, 2nd Earl of Essex, who became the Queen’s favourite and was to have an influence on the political and military world of the latter part of the Queen’s reign.

Penelope’s mother Lettice had been close to the Queen, but was banished from Court and outcast by the Queen on secretly marrying Robert Dudley, Earl of Leicester in 1578.

Penelope was also the muse of the great Elizabethan courtier and poet Philip Sidney; she was the wife of Robert Rich, 3rd Baron Rich (later 1st Earl of Warwick); and she was the mistress and later wife of Christopher Blount, Baron Mountjoy (later 1st Earl of Devonshire). She was a lady of Queen Elizabeth’s court. Those of her family, and those with whom she associated were an integral part of the Elizabethan political and cultural landscape in the second half of the Queen’s long reign.

There is therefore plenty of material with which to work, in telling a historical narrative of Penelope’s life, and the author has very successfully done so. There are, of course, some slight historical ‘fudgings’ of facts and it may be a little fanciful to be a strict historical telling of the years 1581 to 1603, but it is a highly readable and deligtfully engaging historical novel. I found it fascinating to read a narrative of Penelope Devereux in which she is the focal character, and to see those years pass as from her perspective. This is a highly recommended historical novel, as are all of the author’s works; they are all very enjoyable reads.


Dowland: Lachrimae or Seven Teares 1604 by Hesperion XX (2013) Audio CD
Dowland: Lachrimae or Seven Teares 1604 by Hesperion XX (2013) Audio CD

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Dowland: Lachrimae, 3 July 2015
This is a cd that I thought about for quite some time, before purchasing. While I find Dowland’s music beautifully lyrical and very enjoyable to listen to, I wasn’t sure whether I wanted to purchase a whole cd of it, and I also wasn’t sure which performer or performance to go for. In the end, I decided on this one after hearing a track from it played on the radio. I felt that Hesperion XX under Jordi Savall offered a very balanced approach and empathetic approach to Dowland’s music. Other performers may well do the same, but I am very happy with this purchase, having listened to it now several times since I received it.

John Dowland was born in 1563, and for some four years between 1580 and 1586 he lived in France. During this time he converted to Catholicism, and after returning to England found himself living after 1588 in an England ruled by Elizabeth I, who was not necessarily inclined to look favourably upon those of the Catholic faith. So Dowland, by now a married man, was unable to find himself a position at Court. Leaving England, he travelled widely through Germany and Italy. He was horrified to find himself caught up in a Papist plot, and returned to England in 1596, but the perceived promise of a post at Court still eluded him. He was to travel again in his life, finding himself a position at the court of King Christian IV of Denmark in 1598. He was dmissed from that post after neglecting his duties, but found on his return to England that his music was not appreciated. He spent the rest of his life composing and working on musical treatises, dying in 1626.

The pieces in this collection were gathered together as instrumental ensemble pieces by Dowland between 1603 and 1604, and published under the title “Lachrimae, or seven Teares figured in seven passionate pauans, with diuers other Pauans, gaillards, and Almands, set forth for the Lute, Viols or Violins, in fiue partes: By John Dowland Bacheler of Musicke, and Lutenist to the most Royall and Magificient, Christian the fourth, King of Denmark …”. The music collection is the only one that Dowland ever devoted to the instrumental ensemble, and consiss of 21 pieces for whole consort of viols (two trebles, two tenors and one bass) and lute. The music is utterly wonderful, and seems to have a taste of a slight exoticism, no doubt influenced by Dowland’s wide travels and interesting life.

Hesperion XX under Jordi Savall offer a wonderful rendition of these marvellous pieces. The other players are Christophe Coin, Sergi Casademnut, Lorenz Duftschmid, Paolo Pandolfo and Jose Miguel Moreno. The music has been remastered and issued by Alia Vox as a Heritage offering. There is a very nicely presented booklet with the cd, with information on Dowland, his music, pictures of the original publication, and at the back a very interesting section showing other cds available from Alia Vox featuring Jordi Savall. These are always worth hunting out, and it’s good to have them shown in one booklet like this, to be considered. Definitely recommended, this is a wonderful offering of Dowland’s instrumental music performed by masters of the art.


Dowland: Lachrimae or Seven Teares 1604
Dowland: Lachrimae or Seven Teares 1604
Price: £9.99

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Dowland: Lachrimae, 3 July 2015
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This is a cd that I thought about for quite some time, before purchasing. While I find Dowland’s music beautifully lyrical and very enjoyable to listen to, I wasn’t sure whether I wanted to purchase a whole cd of it, and I also wasn’t sure which performer or performance to go for. In the end, I decided on this one after hearing a track from it played on the radio. I felt that Hesperion XX under Jordi Savall offered a very balanced approach and empathetic approach to Dowland’s music. Other performers may well do the same, but I am very happy with this purchase, having listened to it now several times since I received it.

John Dowland was born in 1563, and for some four years between 1580 and 1586 he lived in France. During this time he converted to Catholicism, and after returning to England found himself living after 1588 in an England ruled by Elizabeth I, who was not necessarily inclined to look favourably upon those of the Catholic faith. So Dowland, by now a married man, was unable to find himself a position at Court. Leaving England, he travelled widely through Germany and Italy. He was horrified to find himself caught up in a Papist plot, and returned to England in 1596, but the perceived promise of a post at Court still eluded him. He was to travel again in his life, finding himself a position at the court of King Christian IV of Denmark in 1598. He was dmissed from that post after neglecting his duties, but found on his return to England that his music was not appreciated. He spent the rest of his life composing and working on musical treatises, dying in 1626.

The pieces in this collection were gathered together as instrumental ensemble pieces by Dowland between 1603 and 1604, and published under the title “Lachrimae, or seven Teares figured in seven passionate pauans, with diuers other Pauans, gaillards, and Almands, set forth for the Lute, Viols or Violins, in fiue partes: By John Dowland Bacheler of Musicke, and Lutenist to the most Royall and Magificient, Christian the fourth, King of Denmark …”. The music collection is the only one that Dowland ever devoted to the instrumental ensemble, and consiss of 21 pieces for whole consort of viols (two trebles, two tenors and one bass) and lute. The music is utterly wonderful, and seems to have a taste of a slight exoticism, no doubt influenced by Dowland’s wide travels and interesting life.

Hesperion XX under Jordi Savall offer a wonderful rendition of these marvellous pieces. The other players are Christophe Coin, Sergi Casademnut, Lorenz Duftschmid, Paolo Pandolfo and Jose Miguel Moreno. The music has been remastered and issued by Alia Vox as a Heritage offering. There is a very nicely presented booklet with the cd, with information on Dowland, his music, pictures of the original publication, and at the back a very interesting section showing other cds available from Alia Vox featuring Jordi Savall. These are always worth hunting out, and it’s good to have them shown in one booklet like this, to be considered. Definitely recommended, this is a wonderful offering of Dowland’s instrumental music performed by masters of the art.


By Marc Platt Loups-Garoux (Doctor Who) [Audio CD]
By Marc Platt Loups-Garoux (Doctor Who) [Audio CD]
by Marc Platt
Edition: Audio CD

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Loups-Garoux, 2 July 2015
This is a very early Big Finish release, being only the 20th audio story released by them in the Main Range, released in May 2001.

The story features the Fifth Doctor, played by Peter Davison, who is travelling in this story with Turlough, played fantastically as always by Mark Strickson. It’s a real delight to get these stories with the Fifth Doctor and Turlough alone, as it really gives an opportunity to build on the character of Turlough, who was so sorely neglected in the tv series stories all those years ago.

In Germany in 1589 a murderer is sentenced to a horrific death; as he is dragged off to meet his fate, he scorns the townsfolk and their pitiful existences. Meanwhile, the Doctor and Turlough have gone to Rio in Brazil in the year 2080 to see the Carnival. In Rio a wealthy widow woman strives to get medical help from Doctor Hayashi for her son. But what exactly is wrong with Victor? Heading to the carnival, Turlough finds himself face-to-face with someone or something he can’t quite bring to mind again. And the Doctor finds himself face-to-face with a mystery; and that’s something he can’t leave alone.

I thought this was a fantastic story, right up until the fourth and last episode, where it seemed to fade off into what felt like a rather unsatisfactory ending. The concepts that are used in the story obviously involve werewolves (the French for which is loups-garoux) and the thread of the wolves runs throughout the entire story; extremely evocative and very cleverly done all the way through. The howls of the wolves in the distance, the idea of their presence being hidden from the human ‘cattle’, the speed with which they move, their predatory natures; this is all brilliantly portrayed. The way the story of the wolves is woven into the current-day story of the Amazon is also brilliantly done. The horrors in which the Doctor and Turlough are caught up are brilliantly portrayed as well. I just felt that the resolution of the story (the last 10%) was not as strong as the previous 90% had been, or had led us to expect as a resolution. It just didn’t end as strongly as it had begun, or continued. A pity. Most definitely a fantastic story, but one which on re-listen (and yes, it is a story that can be re-listened to often) is tinged slightly by the somewhat weaker ending.

Peter Davison and Mark Strickson are on top form in this story as the Doctor and Turlough. Guest stars in roles in the story are played by Eleanor Bron as Ileana de Santos, and Burt Kwouk as Doctor Hayashi among others; and they play their roles to the hilt. Special mention must, I think be made of Nicky Henson who plays Pieter Stubbe with awe-inspiring brilliance; you can just imagine how the character he plays is supposed to look from his voice – fantastic. There are quite a lot of other supporting roles in the story as well, and these are all played wonderfully well. Overall, definitely highly recommended.
Comment Comments (5) | Permalink | Most recent comment: Jul 3, 2015 1:22 PM BST


Loups-Garoux (Doctor Who)
Loups-Garoux (Doctor Who)
by Marc Platt
Edition: Audio CD

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Loups-Garoux, 2 July 2015
This is a very early Big Finish release, being only the 20th audio story released by them in the Main Range, released in May 2001.

The story features the Fifth Doctor, played by Peter Davison, who is travelling in this story with Turlough, played fantastically as always by Mark Strickson. It’s a real delight to get these stories with the Fifth Doctor and Turlough alone, as it really gives an opportunity to build on the character of Turlough, who was so sorely neglected in the tv series stories all those years ago.

In Germany in 1589 a murderer is sentenced to a horrific death; as he is dragged off to meet his fate, he scorns the townsfolk and their pitiful existences. Meanwhile, the Doctor and Turlough have gone to Rio in Brazil in the year 2080 to see the Carnival. In Rio a wealthy widow woman strives to get medical help from Doctor Hayashi for her son. But what exactly is wrong with Victor? Heading to the carnival, Turlough finds himself face-to-face with someone or something he can’t quite bring to mind again. And the Doctor finds himself face-to-face with a mystery; and that’s something he can’t leave alone.

I thought this was a fantastic story, right up until the fourth and last episode, where it seemed to fade off into what felt like a rather unsatisfactory ending. The concepts that are used in the story obviously involve werewolves (the French for which is loups-garoux) and the thread of the wolves runs throughout the entire story; extremely evocative and very cleverly done all the way through. The howls of the wolves in the distance, the idea of their presence being hidden from the human ‘cattle’, the speed with which they move, their predatory natures; this is all brilliantly portrayed. The way the story of the wolves is woven into the current-day story of the Amazon is also brilliantly done. The horrors in which the Doctor and Turlough are caught up are brilliantly portrayed as well. I just felt that the resolution of the story (the last 10%) was not as strong as the previous 90% had been, or had led us to expect as a resolution. It just didn’t end as strongly as it had begun, or continued. A pity. Most definitely a fantastic story, but one which on re-listen (and yes, it is a story that can be re-listened to often) is tinged slightly by the somewhat weaker ending.

Peter Davison and Mark Strickson are on top form in this story as the Doctor and Turlough. Guest stars in roles in the story are played by Eleanor Bron as Ileana de Santos, and Burt Kwouk as Doctor Hayashi among others; and they play their roles to the hilt. Special mention must, I think be made of Nicky Henson who plays Pieter Stubbe with awe-inspiring brilliance; you can just imagine how the character he plays is supposed to look from his voice – fantastic. There are quite a lot of other supporting roles in the story as well, and these are all played wonderfully well. Overall, definitely highly recommended.


The Penny Heart
The Penny Heart
by Martine Bailey
Edition: Paperback
Price: £12.78

3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The Penny Heart, 1 July 2015
This review is from: The Penny Heart (Paperback)
I read the first novel by this author, An Appetite for Violets, and was really taken by it. I was delighted to find a new novel by her. This book, like An Appetite for Violets, has running through it a thread of food. At the heading of each chapter, is an eighteenth-century recipe, related to an aspect of the forthcoming chapter. Some of them sound quite delicious, for instance the Yorkshire Fat Rascals. Others are rather ominous, such as Poppy Drops.

The action of the book takes place from 1787 to 1796, and is narrated from the perspective of two main characters. In Manchester, Mary Jebb is transported to Australia at the age of 19 for seven years. She, and those she has left behind, knows it is likely to be a sentence from which she never returns. She leaves mementoes for two men in the shape of penny hearts, pennies engraved with a promise. In Lancashire, Grace Moore is a sensitive soul, who has lost her mother and finds her father a harsh master. She welcomes the opportunity to marry Michael Croxon, a handsome gentleman to whom she gives her heart.

As the paths of these two women slowly meet, only the reader knows the extent of what lies behind some of the actions that then take place. Where it will all end remains a mystery to the very end of the book. The story, told in the third person by Mary, and in the first person by Grace, is a riveting read. I was enthralled from the first page to the last, to read the tales of these two very different women, whose lives are yet so constrained by the times and the society in which they are forced to live. The choices both these women make are difficult and lead to tragedy, but the strength of character of the women is shown throughout. An enthralling read, and definitely recommended, as is the author’s other work.


The New Adventures of Bernice Summerfield: The Triumph of the Sutekh: Volume 2
The New Adventures of Bernice Summerfield: The Triumph of the Sutekh: Volume 2
by Guy Adams
Edition: Audio CD

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The Triumph of Sutekh, 30 Jun. 2015
“Horror and awe, Doctor – horror and awe.”

This is the second box set featuring the adventures of Professor Bernice Summerfield, archaeologist extraordinaire. These stories are linked in with the return of Sutekh, the ancient Egyptian God of Death, who was first seen in Doctor Who in the 1975 story Pyramids of Mars. The impact of Gabriel Woolf, who played Sutekh, in the character has remained with Doctor Who fans ever since, and it is great to hear him in these audio stories again.

The Pyramid of Sutekh (by Guy Adams): Bernice Summerfield is on Mars to study a pyramid which has been found in the midst of an ongoing war. Opening the sarcophagus, she and her guide find something that surprises even Benny. Because she seems to be trapped, in a pyramid with the Doctor and an ancient Osiran God who has returned to offer the gift – Sutekh’s gift of death.

The Vaults of Osiris (by Justin Richards): Ace and Benny need to find a valuable artefact if they have any hope of saving the Doctor. But the Pyramid of Sutekh in 1941 hadn’t been a friendly place for Ace and the Doctor to visit; and the Pyramid and its surrounds in 2015 don’t seem a lot safer.

The Eye of Horus (by James Goss): Benny’s not where she used to be, and not quite who she used to be. But Ancient Egypt seems like a good place to have a party with the Pharaoh Hatshepsut. History isn’t quite the way the scholarly books might have it, but surely it’s all good experience for an archaeologist. Until an old man appears from out of the desert sands.

The Tears of Isis (by Una McCormack): Russell Courtland has a plan for when the world ends; will it go quite as he anticipated? But as far as Ace is concerned, the last thing you want to have happen is to lose track of your friends, even if the Doctor tells her that Sutekh has triumphed. Because Benny may be in more trouble than even she expects.

I think Benny is a great character; she’s a master at talking to herself, which seems to help her come to decisions, and entertains as well as enlightens the listener in these audio stories. She has a great line in monologue, and Lisa Bowerman plays Benny brilliantly.

Hearing Gabriel Woolf reprise his role as Sutekh is a total highlight. The first time you hear that voice again a chill goes down your spine; deep, crisp and full of ominous meaning in every syllable of every word.

There’s a great balance of action in these stories, which involves not only Benny, but Ace and the Doctor. The first story is very Benny-heavy, and the tension is sky-high throughout. In the second story, Benny and Ace share the story wonderfully. In the third story Benny and the Doctor feature, along with Sutekh. And in the fourth story, all three main characters and Sutekh are very much to the fore. I liked that these stories didn’t spoonfeed the listener; they are atmospheric, tension-filled, dramatic and emotional. And they are riveting to listen to, from beginning to end.

There are four stories in this box set series, each on individually cased cds, and with a fifth cd of bonus material. These stories are a great addition to Benny’s adventures, and to the Doctor Who universe as a whole. The stories are brilliantly written by the team of experienced and talented Doctor Who authors, and the cast are all perfectly placed in their individual stories. Together, the four interlinked stories make up a tale of horror and dread, as Sutekh seeks to gain his freedom, and his inheritance. Utterly and totally recommended.
Comment Comments (4) | Permalink | Most recent comment: Jul 1, 2015 7:31 PM BST


Disclaimer
Disclaimer
by Renée Knight
Edition: Hardcover
Price: £7.00

3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Disclaimer, 29 Jun. 2015
This review is from: Disclaimer (Hardcover)
This is a debut novel, and it’s a real page-turner. There are twists and turns in this book from the first page to the last. It’s a psychological mind-bender, which uncovers the real truth about two families, from a past they thought they knew to a present which may be hard to live with. In the story, Catherine, a successful career woman, finds a book which seems to have turned up at the house since they moved. Reading it, she realises with horror that the story in the book is hers – her darkest secret, which was known to only one other person. But that person is dead – aren’t they?

I was totally enthralled by this book. The characters are all rather unlikeable, but they have a real human level to them, which makes the story of what they all go through very emotive. It’s a story that you could imagine happening; and it makes you wonder how you would live with the consequences of the actions that occur in the narrative. It would all be too easy a trap to fall into, to make the same mistakes that some of these characters make, and to have to then deal with the consequences that befall them.

It’s hard to go into too much detail about the story without spoilers, so suffice it to say that I thought this was a great psychological thriller, and one that had me turning the pages avidly to find out what happened next. I did not see any of the twists in the story before they hit me on the page, and I thoroughly enjoyed the journey through this really enthralling book. I hope the author has more books in the pipeline.


By Guy Adams The New Adventures of Bernice Summerfield (Doctor Who)
By Guy Adams The New Adventures of Bernice Summerfield (Doctor Who)
by Guy Adams
Edition: Audio CD

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The New Adventures of Bernice Summerfield, 28 Jun. 2015
This is a great Benny Summerfield box set. If you are not familiar with Benny, or with her previous adventures, this is a great point to join the party. Benny is a character, larger than life, with her own stories and adventures in the Doctor Who universe. But she knows the Doctor well – or she thought she did – and in this box set we get a chance also to investigate Benny’s life as she gets caught up in the Doctor’s deeds.

Each of the four stories in this box set are about 60 minutes each, on single cds, each packaged individually. In the fourth cd case there is a fifth cd, with a bonus disk on ‘the making of’.

The Revolution: Why is Benny lying on the floor of Renk Van Magnastein’s bar on the planet of Arviem 2? And why is there a Timelord hanging on the wall? More to the immediate point, why are homicidal robots chasing Benny and trying to kill her? This is a great story; it starts off with the listener thinking ‘what the heck is going on’ and there’s a whole lot more of that, before the end pay-off is so far-fetched that it can only make complete sense, and you think ‘ah, that explains that so well then!’. Brilliant.

Good Night, Sweet Ladies: Benny’s ship crash lands on the Moon of Adolin, searching for Ace. What she finds instead are two survivors, Steven Day and Claire, and a labyrinth-like structure of a Cathedral. And why does that Dalek keep chasing her down the corridoor? A very labyrinthine story itself, this story seems to start at the end and then go back to the beginning before we find out what’s been going on. Layers of Benny’s life are revealed, and the poignancy of the story is not lost on the listener. Great stuff.

Random Ghosts: This is a most remarkably cleverly presented story, given to us entirely in snippets which have been ‘thematically’ woven together by the editing software used by a film crew on a planet of ‘ghosts’, a Forbidden World. We hear Benny, and later Ace, interacting with one of the film crew, and then others who appear to believe they are inhabitants of the mysterious planet. But nobody’s really sure what’s going on; because every day they wake up and find themselves having to re-learn everything all over again. Using the cameras that are always with them, and always filming, they try to record important information for themselves for each new day. And these snippets of camera recordings are all we hear. But that’s enough for us to slowly piece together a story that becomes a complete nightmare. Because the planet’s nowhere near as benign as some might like it to be.

The Lights of Skaro: The secret of the planet has been uncovered. But there are still plenty of secrets to be found. And Benny must face the worst nightmare of her life, while finding out that there’s more to her own life than she had thought possible. Can the Doctor get to Skaro in time to save her? And what has Ace done? This is an astonishing story; Benny faces up to something that you just don’t see coming, and there are still plenty of horrifying revelations to come as the story progresses. This is like a Dalek nightmare, this story; once you start listening, you will see why.

I would thoroughly recommend this box set to anyone who loves the Doctor Who universe stories. The Doctor makes cameo visits in several places in these stories, but they really are Benny stories, and she is a character who fully deserves her own place in the spotlight. If you haven’t heard Benny before, don’t worry, you will be able to pick it up no problem. Just sit back and enjoy the ride. A fantastic box set of Benny stories, I am really looking forward already to the next box set which features the return of Sutekh the Destroyer – can’t wait!


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