Profile for Keen Reader > Reviews

Personal Profile

Content by Keen Reader
Top Reviewer Ranking: 53
Helpful Votes: 2717

Learn more about Your Profile.

Reviews Written by
Keen Reader "lhendry4" (Auckland, New Zealand)
(TOP 100 REVIEWER)   

Show:  
Page: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11-20
pixel
Interesting Times: (Discworld Novel 17) (Discworld Novels) by Pratchett, Terry (2013)
Interesting Times: (Discworld Novel 17) (Discworld Novels) by Pratchett, Terry (2013)
by Terry Pratchett
Edition: Paperback

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Interesting Times, 1 Mar. 2015
This is the seventeenth Discworld novel by Terry Pratchett, and once again features the delightfully put-upon Rincewind, the “Great Wizzard” (as the Agateans know him). The title refers to the (probably apocryphal) Chinese proverb/curse “May you live in interesting times”. It’s particularly relevant to this story, as Rincewind, ‘rescued’ by the wizards at the Unseen University from a desert island where he was enjoying a particularly restful period of peace and quiet, is sent by teleportation to the Agatean Empire. There he finds himself caught up in a revolution of sorts, as the Emperor is dying, and the Empire is caught up in political turmoil between the Sung, Fang, Hong, Tang and McSweeney clans. Rincewind finds himself caught between a rock and hard place in the capital of the Agatean Empire, Hunghung – is he a peaceful revolutionary, or a revolutionary peacemaker? Life is not made any easier by the arrival of the Silver Horde lead by Cohen the Barbarian; and where has the Luggage gone?

This is another great Discworld novel; I always enjoy the stories with Rincewind; he’s so hapless and so resigned to be a pawn of fate that his continued survival seems to surprise him even more every time it happens. The Patrician makes a brief appearance in the book, and the wizards of the Unseen University are up to their usual standard of ineptitude. Twoflower makes a welcome return, and the involvement of Cohen and his barbarian horde in the Agatean Empire make for ‘interesting’ reading. Great stuff.


[ INTERESTING TIMES BY PRATCHETT, TERRY](AUTHOR)PAPERBACK
[ INTERESTING TIMES BY PRATCHETT, TERRY](AUTHOR)PAPERBACK
by Terry Pratchett
Edition: Paperback

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Interesting Times, 1 Mar. 2015
This is the seventeenth Discworld novel by Terry Pratchett, and once again features the delightfully put-upon Rincewind, the “Great Wizzard” (as the Agateans know him). The title refers to the (probably apocryphal) Chinese proverb/curse “May you live in interesting times”. It’s particularly relevant to this story, as Rincewind, ‘rescued’ by the wizards at the Unseen University from a desert island where he was enjoying a particularly restful period of peace and quiet, is sent by teleportation to the Agatean Empire. There he finds himself caught up in a revolution of sorts, as the Emperor is dying, and the Empire is caught up in political turmoil between the Sung, Fang, Hong, Tang and McSweeney clans. Rincewind finds himself caught between a rock and hard place in the capital of the Agatean Empire, Hunghung – is he a peaceful revolutionary, or a revolutionary peacemaker? Life is not made any easier by the arrival of the Silver Horde lead by Cohen the Barbarian; and where has the Luggage gone?

This is another great Discworld novel; I always enjoy the stories with Rincewind; he’s so hapless and so resigned to be a pawn of fate that his continued survival seems to surprise him even more every time it happens. The Patrician makes a brief appearance in the book, and the wizards of the Unseen University are up to their usual standard of ineptitude. Twoflower makes a welcome return, and the involvement of Cohen and his barbarian horde in the Agatean Empire make for ‘interesting’ reading. Great stuff.


[ Interesting Times ] [ INTERESTING TIMES ] BY Pratchett, Terry ( AUTHOR ) Oct-01-2005 Paperback
[ Interesting Times ] [ INTERESTING TIMES ] BY Pratchett, Terry ( AUTHOR ) Oct-01-2005 Paperback
by Terry Pratchett
Edition: Paperback

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Interesting Times, 1 Mar. 2015
This is the seventeenth Discworld novel by Terry Pratchett, and once again features the delightfully put-upon Rincewind, the “Great Wizzard” (as the Agateans know him). The title refers to the (probably apocryphal) Chinese proverb/curse “May you live in interesting times”. It’s particularly relevant to this story, as Rincewind, ‘rescued’ by the wizards at the Unseen University from a desert island where he was enjoying a particularly restful period of peace and quiet, is sent by teleportation to the Agatean Empire. There he finds himself caught up in a revolution of sorts, as the Emperor is dying, and the Empire is caught up in political turmoil between the Sung, Fang, Hong, Tang and McSweeney clans. Rincewind finds himself caught between a rock and hard place in the capital of the Agatean Empire, Hunghung – is he a peaceful revolutionary, or a revolutionary peacemaker? Life is not made any easier by the arrival of the Silver Horde lead by Cohen the Barbarian; and where has the Luggage gone?

This is another great Discworld novel; I always enjoy the stories with Rincewind; he’s so hapless and so resigned to be a pawn of fate that his continued survival seems to surprise him even more every time it happens. The Patrician makes a brief appearance in the book, and the wizards of the Unseen University are up to their usual standard of ineptitude. Twoflower makes a welcome return, and the involvement of Cohen and his barbarian horde in the Agatean Empire make for ‘interesting’ reading. Great stuff.


Interesting Times: A Discworld Novel by Pratchett. Terry ( 1995 ) Paperback
Interesting Times: A Discworld Novel by Pratchett. Terry ( 1995 ) Paperback
by Pratchett. Terry
Edition: Paperback

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Interesting Times, 1 Mar. 2015
This is the seventeenth Discworld novel by Terry Pratchett, and once again features the delightfully put-upon Rincewind, the “Great Wizzard” (as the Agateans know him). The title refers to the (probably apocryphal) Chinese proverb/curse “May you live in interesting times”. It’s particularly relevant to this story, as Rincewind, ‘rescued’ by the wizards at the Unseen University from a desert island where he was enjoying a particularly restful period of peace and quiet, is sent by teleportation to the Agatean Empire. There he finds himself caught up in a revolution of sorts, as the Emperor is dying, and the Empire is caught up in political turmoil between the Sung, Fang, Hong, Tang and McSweeney clans. Rincewind finds himself caught between a rock and hard place in the capital of the Agatean Empire, Hunghung – is he a peaceful revolutionary, or a revolutionary peacemaker? Life is not made any easier by the arrival of the Silver Horde lead by Cohen the Barbarian; and where has the Luggage gone?

This is another great Discworld novel; I always enjoy the stories with Rincewind; he’s so hapless and so resigned to be a pawn of fate that his continued survival seems to surprise him even more every time it happens. The Patrician makes a brief appearance in the book, and the wizards of the Unseen University are up to their usual standard of ineptitude. Twoflower makes a welcome return, and the involvement of Cohen and his barbarian horde in the Agatean Empire make for ‘interesting’ reading. Great stuff.


Interesting Times: A Discworld Novel: 17
Interesting Times: A Discworld Novel: 17
by Terry Pratchett
Edition: Paperback
Price: £7.99

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Interesting Times, 1 Mar. 2015
This is the seventeenth Discworld novel by Terry Pratchett, and once again features the delightfully put-upon Rincewind, the “Great Wizzard” (as the Agateans know him). The title refers to the (probably apocryphal) Chinese proverb/curse “May you live in interesting times”. It’s particularly relevant to this story, as Rincewind, ‘rescued’ by the wizards at the Unseen University from a desert island where he was enjoying a particularly restful period of peace and quiet, is sent by teleportation to the Agatean Empire. There he finds himself caught up in a revolution of sorts, as the Emperor is dying, and the Empire is caught up in political turmoil between the Sung, Fang, Hong, Tang and McSweeney clans. Rincewind finds himself caught between a rock and hard place in the capital of the Agatean Empire, Hunghung – is he a peaceful revolutionary, or a revolutionary peacemaker? Life is not made any easier by the arrival of the Silver Horde lead by Cohen the Barbarian; and where has the Luggage gone?

This is another great Discworld novel; I always enjoy the stories with Rincewind; he’s so hapless and so resigned to be a pawn of fate that his continued survival seems to surprise him even more every time it happens. The Patrician makes a brief appearance in the book, and the wizards of the Unseen University are up to their usual standard of ineptitude. Twoflower makes a welcome return, and the involvement of Cohen and his barbarian horde in the Agatean Empire make for ‘interesting’ reading. Great stuff.


Foul Deeds and Suspicious Deaths in Cumbria (Foul Deeds & Suspicious Deaths)
Foul Deeds and Suspicious Deaths in Cumbria (Foul Deeds & Suspicious Deaths)
by Nicholas Corder
Edition: Paperback
Price: £8.88

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Foul Deeds and Suspicious Deaths in Cumbria, 28 Feb. 2015
I picked this up by chance, and it was a great read – one of those book you read a chapter, think about it, and then read another one when you feel so inclined. This book features ‘Foul Deeds and Suspicious Deaths’ in Cumbria – there are others in the series which feature other areas – there seem to be some 60 books in the series, covering areas from Barking, Dagenham and Chadwell Heath, through to York.

The book has the format (which I assume others in the series follow) of picking out true stories from the past which occurred in the area – foul deeds and suspicious deaths – some solved, some unsolved. This book has 20 chapters featuring different deeds from John Paul Jones and the Whitehaven Raid in 1778, through to The Borrowdale Garrotting in 1928.

All very dark and gruesome, and offered to the reader in short chapters featuring the outline of the crime, the characters involved, and snippets from press releases and stories of the time. A delightful (in a rather ghastly way) book, and I shall look out for more in the series – very interesting.
Comment Comments (2) | Permalink | Most recent comment: Feb 28, 2015 5:34 PM GMT


Empress of the Night: A Novel of Catherine the Great (Thorndike Press Large Print Historical Fiction)
Empress of the Night: A Novel of Catherine the Great (Thorndike Press Large Print Historical Fiction)
by Eva Stachniak
Edition: Hardcover
Price: £20.12

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Empress of the Night, 28 Feb. 2015
Sometime around 9 a.m. on the morning of (O.S.) 5 November 1796, Catherine the Great, Empress of Russia, suffered a stroke. She fell into a coma, and died late in the evening of 6 November, aged 67. Born in 1729 as Sophie Friederike Auguste von Anhalt-Zerbst-Dornburg, she had married Peter (later Tsar Peter III), nephew of the Empress Elizabeth in 1745. In 1762, Elizabeth died and Peter became Tsar. Six months later he died in suspicious circumstances, and Catherine became Empress. She ruled Russia for 34 years.

This book tells Catherine’s story, from the time of her falling ill on 5 November 1796, through to her death, through vignettes of her remembrances and recollections of her life from the time she arrived in Russia. The short glimpses of her life that we see offer slightly fragmented viewpoints, and I can see that it would be a little difficult at times to work out motivations and political considerations for some of the recollected moments if you were not familiar with Catherine’s rule, her family and Russia in the eighteenth century.

While a pleasant read, I felt that this book never really allowed us to get into the character of Catherine fully. We remained distant from her and her experiences, and I think this is partly because of the way the narrative has been presented. We see what she remembers in the short scenes, but we never really get to ‘see’ how, why and wherefore throughout. Catherine the Great is a name remembered by most, and she certainly lived life to the fullest, with great political power, and many lovers throughout her life. But this book doesn’t quite do her the justice I had hoped for in a novelised version of her life.
Comment Comments (2) | Permalink | Most recent comment: Feb 28, 2015 5:32 PM GMT


Doctor Who and the Leisure Hive
Doctor Who and the Leisure Hive

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars The Leisure Hive, 28 Feb. 2015
This is the novelisation of the four part story first broadcast in 1980, as the first story of Season 18, and the first story produced by John Nathan-Turner. The novel itself is written by the writer of the story, which is good as it means the novel should really reflect the writer's original intentions. I found this on tv a confusing and rather muddly story; in the novel, it at least has the opportunity to explain elements that don't come across on the visual medium, so it's less confusing. But I'm afraid I still find it rather muddly.

The Doctor and Romana, with K-9 are taking a holiday on Brighton; or they are, until K-9 swallows too much seawater and blows a few gaskets, and the weather on Brighton is not suitable for a beach holiday, so Romana makes the Doctor take them to Argolis, the Leisure Planet. Here, if anywhere in the universe, they should be able to have a nice relaxing holiday - shouldn't they? Well, no, not really. The Tachyon Recreation Generator, used by the Argolins for the entertainment of their paying guests starts to play up with fatal consequences - but who is behind the scenes, and what does this have to do with the Argolins not getting the income they require to keep their Leisure Planet going? The Doctor and Romana are caught up in events that they really didn't want to have anything to do with, and must seek to redeem not only their holiday, but their lives.

My impressions? A good Fourth Doctor story, but one that just got all a bit muddled somewhere in the telling.
Comment Comments (4) | Permalink | Most recent comment: Mar 1, 2015 2:52 AM GMT


The Leisure Hive
The Leisure Hive
by David Fisher
Edition: Paperback

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars The Leisure Hive, 28 Feb. 2015
This review is from: The Leisure Hive (Paperback)
This is the novelisation of the four part story first broadcast in 1980, as the first story of Season 18, and the first story produced by John Nathan-Turner. The novel itself is written by the writer of the story, which is good as it means the novel should really reflect the writer's original intentions. I found this on tv a confusing and rather muddly story; in the novel, it at least has the opportunity to explain elements that don't come across on the visual medium, so it's less confusing. But I'm afraid I still find it rather muddly.

The Doctor and Romana, with K-9 are taking a holiday on Brighton; or they are, until K-9 swallows too much seawater and blows a few gaskets, and the weather on Brighton is not suitable for a beach holiday, so Romana makes the Doctor take them to Argolis, the Leisure Planet. Here, if anywhere in the universe, they should be able to have a nice relaxing holiday - shouldn't they? Well, no, not really. The Tachyon Recreation Generator, used by the Argolins for the entertainment of their paying guests starts to play up with fatal consequences - but who is behind the scenes, and what does this have to do with the Argolins not getting the income they require to keep their Leisure Planet going? The Doctor and Romana are caught up in events that they really didn't want to have anything to do with, and must seek to redeem not only their holiday, but their lives.

My impressions? A good Fourth Doctor story, but one that just got all a bit muddled somewhere in the telling.


[(Sleep Tight)] [ By (author) Rachel Abbott ] [February, 2014]
[(Sleep Tight)] [ By (author) Rachel Abbott ] [February, 2014]
by Rachel Abbott
Edition: Paperback

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Sleep Tight, 27 Feb. 2015
The author is new to me, but the book looked an interesting premise, so I took a punt on this one, and I’m glad I did.

Some seven years before the beginning of the main story, Olivia’s boyfriend Dan brought an airplane ticket and disappeared out of her life, leaving her with a new baby. Seven years later, she’s unhappy with her husband Robert; but she fears any decision to leave him will lead to him taking revenge on her children; her first child Jasmine, and their two children Freddie and Billy. Two years after those events, the family calls upon the Police again. DCI Tom Douglas was there when Dan disappeared; he knows of the case seven years later with Robert; and now he finds himself involved again in Olivia’s life.

The narrative in this story moves between some of the characters; first person present tense from Olivia, third person from Tom and DI Becky Robinson, and from Robert, and briefly from a few others as the story progresses. This gives a real ‘immediacy’ to the narrative which is welcome in a story where the action moves at a fast pace. There are plenty of twists and turns in this story, and if it all comes together in a way that may seem a bit farfetched, there’s no harm in enjoying the journey of a good read. It just goes to show we never know what’s going on behind the doors of an ordinary family in modern suburbia. I look forward to more works by the author.
Comment Comments (4) | Permalink | Most recent comment: Feb 28, 2015 12:35 AM GMT


Page: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11-20