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By Nicholas Briggs Destroy the Infinite (Doctor Who: The Fourth Doctor Adventures)
By Nicholas Briggs Destroy the Infinite (Doctor Who: The Fourth Doctor Adventures)
by Nicholas Briggs
Edition: Audio CD

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Destroy the Infinite, 31 Mar. 2015
This is the sixth story in the third season of the Fourth Doctor Adventures, featuring Tom Baker as the Fourth Doctor, with Louise Jameson as Leela, his ‘savage’ companion. The Doctor takes Leela to see a successful Earth colony Delafoss, where the people farm, and live a simple life. But when they get there, they find Delafoss is a huge industrial planet, ruled by the Eminence, whose Infinite Warriors rule the slave population through force and brutality.

What are the Eminence, and what is it that they are doing on Delafoss? Trying to find out, the Doctor and Leela are separated, and must both find their own way to stop the Infinite, and ultimately stop the Eminence.

The Eminence are a ‘new’ alien enemy for the Doctor, but so far have made three appearances, all about the same time. This story features their first appearance to the earliest Doctor incarnation, the Fourth. But there are two other appearances by the Eminence, The Seeds of War with the Sixth Doctor, and in Dark Eyes 2 with the Eighth Doctor. Clearly these are an enemy that the Doctor must struggle to overcome, and we can hope for more appearances from these alien life forms yet.

This is a great story; supported by a great guest cast, the Doctor and Leela show up tremendously well throughout in their characterisations. In particular, Clive Mantle as Tillegat and Lieutenant Treves doesn’t have a large role in this story, but he has appeared in several other BF audio stories and always has a great audio ‘presence’. (He has played Oliver Cromwell in The Settling, and Tuvold in The Burning Prince.) Michael Fenton-Stevens as Moorson also has worked in BF audios before – as Shakespeare in The Kingmaker, and Brooks in The Raincloud Man. The voices of the Eminence, and the Infinite Warriors is particularly chilling in this story; you can imagine all sorts of horrors as to what they may look like, and the voices give a really horrifying feeling to their ‘reality’.

A great story, and one which offers room for sequels, both for the Eminence, but also for the struggle of the Earth Alliance to free their colony worlds. Definitely recommended.
Comment Comments (5) | Permalink | Most recent comment: Mar 31, 2015 9:25 PM BST


[(Destroy the Infinite)] [ By (author) Nicholas Briggs ] [June, 2014]
[(Destroy the Infinite)] [ By (author) Nicholas Briggs ] [June, 2014]
by Nicholas Briggs
Edition: Audio CD

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Destroy the Infinite, 31 Mar. 2015
This is the sixth story in the third season of the Fourth Doctor Adventures, featuring Tom Baker as the Fourth Doctor, with Louise Jameson as Leela, his ‘savage’ companion. The Doctor takes Leela to see a successful Earth colony Delafoss, where the people farm, and live a simple life. But when they get there, they find Delafoss is a huge industrial planet, ruled by the Eminence, whose Infinite Warriors rule the slave population through force and brutality.

What are the Eminence, and what is it that they are doing on Delafoss? Trying to find out, the Doctor and Leela are separated, and must both find their own way to stop the Infinite, and ultimately stop the Eminence.

The Eminence are a ‘new’ alien enemy for the Doctor, but so far have made three appearances, all about the same time. This story features their first appearance to the earliest Doctor incarnation, the Fourth. But there are two other appearances by the Eminence, The Seeds of War with the Sixth Doctor, and in Dark Eyes 2 with the Eighth Doctor. Clearly these are an enemy that the Doctor must struggle to overcome, and we can hope for more appearances from these alien life forms yet.

This is a great story; supported by a great guest cast, the Doctor and Leela show up tremendously well throughout in their characterisations. In particular, Clive Mantle as Tillegat and Lieutenant Treves doesn’t have a large role in this story, but he has appeared in several other BF audio stories and always has a great audio ‘presence’. (He has played Oliver Cromwell in The Settling, and Tuvold in The Burning Prince.) Michael Fenton-Stevens as Moorson also has worked in BF audios before – as Shakespeare in The Kingmaker, and Brooks in The Raincloud Man. The voices of the Eminence, and the Infinite Warriors is particularly chilling in this story; you can imagine all sorts of horrors as to what they may look like, and the voices give a really horrifying feeling to their ‘reality’.

A great story, and one which offers room for sequels, both for the Eminence, but also for the struggle of the Earth Alliance to free their colony worlds. Definitely recommended.


Destroy the Infinite (Doctor Who: The Fourth Doctor Adventures)
Destroy the Infinite (Doctor Who: The Fourth Doctor Adventures)
by Nicholas Briggs
Edition: Audio CD
Price: £10.99

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Destroy the Infinite, 31 Mar. 2015
This is the sixth story in the third season of the Fourth Doctor Adventures, featuring Tom Baker as the Fourth Doctor, with Louise Jameson as Leela, his ‘savage’ companion. The Doctor takes Leela to see a successful Earth colony Delafoss, where the people farm, and live a simple life. But when they get there, they find Delafoss is a huge industrial planet, ruled by the Eminence, whose Infinite Warriors rule the slave population through force and brutality.

What are the Eminence, and what is it that they are doing on Delafoss? Trying to find out, the Doctor and Leela are separated, and must both find their own way to stop the Infinite, and ultimately stop the Eminence.

The Eminence are a ‘new’ alien enemy for the Doctor, but so far have made three appearances, all about the same time. This story features their first appearance to the earliest Doctor incarnation, the Fourth. But there are two other appearances by the Eminence, The Seeds of War with the Sixth Doctor, and in Dark Eyes 2 with the Eighth Doctor. Clearly these are an enemy that the Doctor must struggle to overcome, and we can hope for more appearances from these alien life forms yet.

This is a great story; supported by a great guest cast, the Doctor and Leela show up tremendously well throughout in their characterisations. In particular, Clive Mantle as Tillegat and Lieutenant Treves doesn’t have a large role in this story, but he has appeared in several other BF audio stories and always has a great audio ‘presence’. (He has played Oliver Cromwell in The Settling, and Tuvold in The Burning Prince.) Michael Fenton-Stevens as Moorson also has worked in BF audios before – as Shakespeare in The Kingmaker, and Brooks in The Raincloud Man. The voices of the Eminence, and the Infinite Warriors is particularly chilling in this story; you can imagine all sorts of horrors as to what they may look like, and the voices give a really horrifying feeling to their ‘reality’.

A great story, and one which offers room for sequels, both for the Eminence, but also for the struggle of the Earth Alliance to free their colony worlds. Definitely recommended.


[(The Violent Century)] [ By (author) Lavie Tidhar ] [April, 2014]
[(The Violent Century)] [ By (author) Lavie Tidhar ] [April, 2014]
by Lavie Tidhar
Edition: Paperback

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The Violent Century, 31 Mar. 2015
This is an absolutely fantastic book, I had no doubt about that; but how to review and explain it to a new reader?

What do Fogg and Oblivion have in common? Not fog and oblivion; but Fogg and Oblivion. They are both `changed'; members of the Bureau, those shadowy observers who have been affected by the change generated by Vomacht's machine, enrolled in the team led by the Old Man. Found and trained in the lead up to the Second World War, a large part of this story takes place during that war; the horrors on the Eastern Front, in the depths of Germany, in Paris, across Europe and beyond. But the end of the War is just the beginning. Because for the changed, the War never ends.

The author has written comics and screenplays as well as novels, and that's what this novel `sounds' like, if I can put it like that. Actually it's a bit like watching a movie; scenes change, we see people and actions and they scroll before us. Indeed the novel shifts between scenes; 164 of them in all. At first, the method of narrative is short, blocky with no speech marks around speech. It took me a few pages of this to get it straightened out in my head, but then it just seemed to flow, like it was visual, unfolding into the scenes without the need for such things. Let me give you an example:

Oblivion nods. As though he understood more than the words. Your smokescreen? he says, softly.
- It's just habit, Fogg says.
Oblivion nods. I remember.
- Old tradecraft, Fogg says. Sounds sheepish.

I absolutely loved this book; it was clever, ambitious, stunningly original; a brilliantly clever weave of fact and `maybe' fact/fiction - who knows for sure? But it's breathtakingly well constructed, and totally enthralling. I was drawn into it and held enthralled in the story till the last page, sorry when it ended. This would have to be one of the top 10 best novels I've read in a long time.


The Violent Century by Tidhar, Lavie (2013) Hardcover
The Violent Century by Tidhar, Lavie (2013) Hardcover

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The Violent Century, 31 Mar. 2015
This is an absolutely fantastic book, I had no doubt about that; but how to review and explain it to a new reader?

What do Fogg and Oblivion have in common? Not fog and oblivion; but Fogg and Oblivion. They are both `changed'; members of the Bureau, those shadowy observers who have been affected by the change generated by Vomacht's machine, enrolled in the team led by the Old Man. Found and trained in the lead up to the Second World War, a large part of this story takes place during that war; the horrors on the Eastern Front, in the depths of Germany, in Paris, across Europe and beyond. But the end of the War is just the beginning. Because for the changed, the War never ends.

The author has written comics and screenplays as well as novels, and that's what this novel `sounds' like, if I can put it like that. Actually it's a bit like watching a movie; scenes change, we see people and actions and they scroll before us. Indeed the novel shifts between scenes; 164 of them in all. At first, the method of narrative is short, blocky with no speech marks around speech. It took me a few pages of this to get it straightened out in my head, but then it just seemed to flow, like it was visual, unfolding into the scenes without the need for such things. Let me give you an example:

Oblivion nods. As though he understood more than the words. Your smokescreen? he says, softly.
- It's just habit, Fogg says.
Oblivion nods. I remember.
- Old tradecraft, Fogg says. Sounds sheepish.

I absolutely loved this book; it was clever, ambitious, stunningly original; a brilliantly clever weave of fact and `maybe' fact/fiction - who knows for sure? But it's breathtakingly well constructed, and totally enthralling. I was drawn into it and held enthralled in the story till the last page, sorry when it ended. This would have to be one of the top 10 best novels I've read in a long time.


The Violent Century by Tidhar, Lavie (2013) Hardcover
The Violent Century by Tidhar, Lavie (2013) Hardcover

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The Violent Century, 31 Mar. 2015
This is an absolutely fantastic book, I had no doubt about that; but how to review and explain it to a new reader?

What do Fogg and Oblivion have in common? Not fog and oblivion; but Fogg and Oblivion. They are both `changed'; members of the Bureau, those shadowy observers who have been affected by the change generated by Vomacht's machine, enrolled in the team led by the Old Man. Found and trained in the lead up to the Second World War, a large part of this story takes place during that war; the horrors on the Eastern Front, in the depths of Germany, in Paris, across Europe and beyond. But the end of the War is just the beginning. Because for the changed, the War never ends.

The author has written comics and screenplays as well as novels, and that's what this novel `sounds' like, if I can put it like that. Actually it's a bit like watching a movie; scenes change, we see people and actions and they scroll before us. Indeed the novel shifts between scenes; 164 of them in all. At first, the method of narrative is short, blocky with no speech marks around speech. It took me a few pages of this to get it straightened out in my head, but then it just seemed to flow, like it was visual, unfolding into the scenes without the need for such things. Let me give you an example:

Oblivion nods. As though he understood more than the words. Your smokescreen? he says, softly.
- It's just habit, Fogg says.
Oblivion nods. I remember.
- Old tradecraft, Fogg says. Sounds sheepish.

I absolutely loved this book; it was clever, ambitious, stunningly original; a brilliantly clever weave of fact and `maybe' fact/fiction - who knows for sure? But it's breathtakingly well constructed, and totally enthralling. I was drawn into it and held enthralled in the story till the last page, sorry when it ended. This would have to be one of the top 10 best novels I've read in a long time.


The Violent Century by Tidhar, Lavie (2013) Hardcover
The Violent Century by Tidhar, Lavie (2013) Hardcover
by Lavie Tidhar
Edition: Hardcover

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The Violent Century, 31 Mar. 2015
This is an absolutely fantastic book, I had no doubt about that; but how to review and explain it to a new reader?

What do Fogg and Oblivion have in common? Not fog and oblivion; but Fogg and Oblivion. They are both `changed'; members of the Bureau, those shadowy observers who have been affected by the change generated by Vomacht's machine, enrolled in the team led by the Old Man. Found and trained in the lead up to the Second World War, a large part of this story takes place during that war; the horrors on the Eastern Front, in the depths of Germany, in Paris, across Europe and beyond. But the end of the War is just the beginning. Because for the changed, the War never ends.

The author has written comics and screenplays as well as novels, and that's what this novel `sounds' like, if I can put it like that. Actually it's a bit like watching a movie; scenes change, we see people and actions and they scroll before us. Indeed the novel shifts between scenes; 164 of them in all. At first, the method of narrative is short, blocky with no speech marks around speech. It took me a few pages of this to get it straightened out in my head, but then it just seemed to flow, like it was visual, unfolding into the scenes without the need for such things. Let me give you an example:

Oblivion nods. As though he understood more than the words. Your smokescreen? he says, softly.
- It's just habit, Fogg says.
Oblivion nods. I remember.
- Old tradecraft, Fogg says. Sounds sheepish.

I absolutely loved this book; it was clever, ambitious, stunningly original; a brilliantly clever weave of fact and `maybe' fact/fiction - who knows for sure? But it's breathtakingly well constructed, and totally enthralling. I was drawn into it and held enthralled in the story till the last page, sorry when it ended. This would have to be one of the top 10 best novels I've read in a long time.


The Violent Century by Tidhar. Lavie ( 2013 ) Hardcover
The Violent Century by Tidhar. Lavie ( 2013 ) Hardcover

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The Violent Century, 31 Mar. 2015
This is an absolutely fantastic book, I had no doubt about that; but how to review and explain it to a new reader?

What do Fogg and Oblivion have in common? Not fog and oblivion; but Fogg and Oblivion. They are both `changed'; members of the Bureau, those shadowy observers who have been affected by the change generated by Vomacht's machine, enrolled in the team led by the Old Man. Found and trained in the lead up to the Second World War, a large part of this story takes place during that war; the horrors on the Eastern Front, in the depths of Germany, in Paris, across Europe and beyond. But the end of the War is just the beginning. Because for the changed, the War never ends.

The author has written comics and screenplays as well as novels, and that's what this novel `sounds' like, if I can put it like that. Actually it's a bit like watching a movie; scenes change, we see people and actions and they scroll before us. Indeed the novel shifts between scenes; 164 of them in all. At first, the method of narrative is short, blocky with no speech marks around speech. It took me a few pages of this to get it straightened out in my head, but then it just seemed to flow, like it was visual, unfolding into the scenes without the need for such things. Let me give you an example:

Oblivion nods. As though he understood more than the words. Your smokescreen? he says, softly.
- It's just habit, Fogg says.
Oblivion nods. I remember.
- Old tradecraft, Fogg says. Sounds sheepish.

I absolutely loved this book; it was clever, ambitious, stunningly original; a brilliantly clever weave of fact and `maybe' fact/fiction - who knows for sure? But it's breathtakingly well constructed, and totally enthralling. I was drawn into it and held enthralled in the story till the last page, sorry when it ended. This would have to be one of the top 10 best novels I've read in a long time.


[(A Man Lies Dreaming)] [ By (author) Lavie Tidhar ] [October, 2014]
[(A Man Lies Dreaming)] [ By (author) Lavie Tidhar ] [October, 2014]
by Lavie Tidhar
Edition: Hardcover

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A Man Lies Dreaming, 31 Mar. 2015
In January 2014 I read a book by Lavie Tidhar, The Violent Century. It was an astonishing book. I was delighted to see another book by the author, A Man Lies Dreaming and rushed to read it. This book is also astonishing; very different to The Violent Century, but just as utterly compelling.

In 1939, a man lies dreaming; the man, Shomer, is, as we slowly discover, a man whose refuge is in dreaming. Before the war he was a writer, and it is in writing, albeit now in his imagination, that he finds some solace from the hell in which he now lives.

Another man is the half-product of his dreaming; this man had lived another life, before The Fall in 1933 reduced him to where he finds himself now.

This book turns on the elections in Germany in 1933, where, in Shomer’s dream National Socialism did not win. Communism has spread itself across Europe, and now in 1939 war is on the way. In England, Wolf is a private investigator. We read excerpts from his diary, and narration of his actions from a third party narrative. The Watcher is also there. And somewhere, Shomer lies dreaming.

This is a book of history, yet also of humanity. How brutal man can be to man is known to us from the narrative we know of the twentieth century; in dreams is reality any different? This is an utterly enthralling read; but it is by no means a jolly cheerful read. Rather, it is in turns brutal, harrowing, heartbreaking, and intriguing. A glimpse into a world that could have been. And still a world where every man seeks their own path, their own redemption, their own dream.

If you read no other book this year, I would recommend you read this. This has to be one of the best books I have ever read, and one that I will most certainly read again. There are layers to this book that will haunt you as you turn the pages, and which I only allude to above, because it is for the reader to tease those threads of those layers apart to reveal what lies beneath. This is a book that has to be experienced for oneself.


By Lavie Tidhar A Man Lies Dreaming [Hardcover]
By Lavie Tidhar A Man Lies Dreaming [Hardcover]
by Lavie Tidhar
Edition: Hardcover

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A Man Lies Dreaming, 31 Mar. 2015
In January 2014 I read a book by Lavie Tidhar, The Violent Century. It was an astonishing book. I was delighted to see another book by the author, A Man Lies Dreaming and rushed to read it. This book is also astonishing; very different to The Violent Century, but just as utterly compelling.

In 1939, a man lies dreaming; the man, Shomer, is, as we slowly discover, a man whose refuge is in dreaming. Before the war he was a writer, and it is in writing, albeit now in his imagination, that he finds some solace from the hell in which he now lives.

Another man is the half-product of his dreaming; this man had lived another life, before The Fall in 1933 reduced him to where he finds himself now.

This book turns on the elections in Germany in 1933, where, in Shomer’s dream National Socialism did not win. Communism has spread itself across Europe, and now in 1939 war is on the way. In England, Wolf is a private investigator. We read excerpts from his diary, and narration of his actions from a third party narrative. The Watcher is also there. And somewhere, Shomer lies dreaming.

This is a book of history, yet also of humanity. How brutal man can be to man is known to us from the narrative we know of the twentieth century; in dreams is reality any different? This is an utterly enthralling read; but it is by no means a jolly cheerful read. Rather, it is in turns brutal, harrowing, heartbreaking, and intriguing. A glimpse into a world that could have been. And still a world where every man seeks their own path, their own redemption, their own dream.

If you read no other book this year, I would recommend you read this. This has to be one of the best books I have ever read, and one that I will most certainly read again. There are layers to this book that will haunt you as you turn the pages, and which I only allude to above, because it is for the reader to tease those threads of those layers apart to reveal what lies beneath. This is a book that has to be experienced for oneself.


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