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By Nigel Fairs The Abandoned (Doctor Who: The Fourth Doctor Adventures) [Audio CD]
By Nigel Fairs The Abandoned (Doctor Who: The Fourth Doctor Adventures) [Audio CD]
by Nigel Fairs
Edition: Audio CD

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The Abandoned, 27 April 2015
“The rest … is silence.”

This is the seventh story in the third series of the Fourth Doctor Adventures, featuring the Fourth Doctor as played by Tom Baker, travelling with his companion Leela, played by Louise Jameson. Louise Jameson is the co-author of this story, together with Nigel Fairs. This is the first story of this type that Louise Jameson has undertaken, and I thought it was brilliant. The story is quite unusual, although in a few ways I felt the influence of a First Doctor story, Edge of Destruction. This is because the story is set entirely within the Tardis, and it is an important story in that it offers background to the Tardis itself.

The Doctor is continuing Leela’s education, and as part of that he tells her to go to the Library and get a painting off the wall. But before she goes, we learn that there is a place where the name must never be mentioned - the Point of … (well, I can’t tell you if it must never be mentioned). It must not even be thought, or whispered. From there, the story becomes rather surreal. There is another character who we hear talking, who appears to be painting. Who is she? And then other voices appear – talking to her, talking to Leela, and to the Doctor. Who are they? And where did they come from? And most importantly, what do they all want?

I found this story utterly enthralling. The character of Leela has been given great exposition in this story, showing that Louise Jameson has a totally comprehensive understanding of the character who she has spent such a long time playing. Leela as a human being is explored brilliantly in the story, and her relationship with the Doctor, vital to the storyline, is wonderfully shown in the dialogue between her and Tom Baker’s Doctor. Similarly, Leela’s and the Doctor’s characters are key to the resolution of the story; working together, they make a stronger unit. For a story that really relies very much on being ‘visual’ in explanation, this fully audio-based story has done a remarkable job ‘painting’ (forgive the pun) the landscape, the characters, and the story as it unfolds. I felt I could ‘see’ every part of the story as it played out. Louise Jameson, Tom Baker and main guest star Stephanie Cole have done a brilliant job in this story.


The Abandoned (Doctor Who: The Fourth Doctor Adventures)
The Abandoned (Doctor Who: The Fourth Doctor Adventures)
by Nigel Fairs
Edition: Audio CD
Price: £10.99

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The Abandoned, 27 April 2015
“The rest … is silence.”

This is the seventh story in the third series of the Fourth Doctor Adventures, featuring the Fourth Doctor as played by Tom Baker, travelling with his companion Leela, played by Louise Jameson. Louise Jameson is the co-author of this story, together with Nigel Fairs. This is the first story of this type that Louise Jameson has undertaken, and I thought it was brilliant. The story is quite unusual, although in a few ways I felt the influence of a First Doctor story, Edge of Destruction. This is because the story is set entirely within the Tardis, and it is an important story in that it offers background to the Tardis itself.

The Doctor is continuing Leela’s education, and as part of that he tells her to go to the Library and get a painting off the wall. But before she goes, we learn that there is a place where the name must never be mentioned - the Point of … (well, I can’t tell you if it must never be mentioned). It must not even be thought, or whispered. From there, the story becomes rather surreal. There is another character who we hear talking, who appears to be painting. Who is she? And then other voices appear – talking to her, talking to Leela, and to the Doctor. Who are they? And where did they come from? And most importantly, what do they all want?

I found this story utterly enthralling. The character of Leela has been given great exposition in this story, showing that Louise Jameson has a totally comprehensive understanding of the character who she has spent such a long time playing. Leela as a human being is explored brilliantly in the story, and her relationship with the Doctor, vital to the storyline, is wonderfully shown in the dialogue between her and Tom Baker’s Doctor. Similarly, Leela’s and the Doctor’s characters are key to the resolution of the story; working together, they make a stronger unit. For a story that really relies very much on being ‘visual’ in explanation, this fully audio-based story has done a remarkable job ‘painting’ (forgive the pun) the landscape, the characters, and the story as it unfolds. I felt I could ‘see’ every part of the story as it played out. Louise Jameson, Tom Baker and main guest star Stephanie Cole have done a brilliant job in this story.
Comment Comments (4) | Permalink | Most recent comment: Apr 28, 2015 1:24 AM BST


Raiders Of The Nile (Roma sub Rosa) by Saylor, Steven (2014) Hardcover
Raiders Of The Nile (Roma sub Rosa) by Saylor, Steven (2014) Hardcover

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Raiders of the Nile, 26 April 2015
Steven Saylor has written the series known as the Roma Sub Rosa series, featuring the sleuth Gordianus the finder, and his family in late Republic Rome. The first twelve books in the series, published between 1991 and 2008 went in chronological order from 80 BC to 46 BC. Then Saylor wrote The Seven Wonders (2012) which goes back to Gordianus’s youth, and is set in 92-90 BC. This book, Raiders of the Nile follows on from The Seven Wonders so again features Gordianus as a young man, and is set in 88 BC. (Two other books, Roma: The Novel of Ancient Rome (2007) and Empire: The Novel of Imperial Rome (2010) are generational epics from Early to Imperial Rome through to 141 AD and the rule of Hadrian. Those books do not feature Gordianus.) These are absolutely wonderful books, and I have read them all (though prior to my Amazon reviewing, so I have not yet reviewed them).

At the end of The Seven Wonders Gordianus had brought a slave, Bethesda (little knowing how closely linked her future and his were to be, as we know from the later chronological Gordianus books). Now, in 88 BC Gordianus is living in Alexandria and has just celebrated his 22nd birthday. As he tells us in the first sentence of the book, “I had a long list of things I wanted to do, but taking part in a raid to steal the golden sarcophagus of Alexander the Great had never been among them.”

Where the chronologically later Gordianus books take us into the depths of the narrow streets and lanes of Republican Rome and its environs, these latest two books have taken us into Egypt – through the dusty streets of Alexandria and down the Nile, and in this latest book across the Delta with only a streetwise young slave called Djet and a vaguely amenable camel for friendly company. Gordianus’s tale of how he came to be robbing the tomb of Alexander the Great is a great story; full of people good and bad, death, disaster and general mayhem as Gordianus seeks to solve his own mystery and stay alive.

These books are great; the narrative is in the first person of Gordianus, as he takes us through his actions and thought processes to solve mysteries and bring some semblance of justice to situations he finds himself in. The action is always racing along, and there is always an element of wit; in these books set in Gordianus’s earlier life there is a bit of refreshing naivety in Gordianus which cycnicism wears away as he gets older in the later chronological books. I love the way the author has given us a glimpse into these early worlds; colours, sights, sounds, people, customs and a way of life that is so alien to us. Gordianus is a great central character, and I look forward to many more of his adventures.


Raiders of the Nile (The Ancient World) by Saylor, Steven (2014) Hardcover
Raiders of the Nile (The Ancient World) by Saylor, Steven (2014) Hardcover

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Raiders of the Nile, 26 April 2015
Steven Saylor has written the series known as the Roma Sub Rosa series, featuring the sleuth Gordianus the finder, and his family in late Republic Rome. The first twelve books in the series, published between 1991 and 2008 went in chronological order from 80 BC to 46 BC. Then Saylor wrote The Seven Wonders (2012) which goes back to Gordianus’s youth, and is set in 92-90 BC. This book, Raiders of the Nile follows on from The Seven Wonders so again features Gordianus as a young man, and is set in 88 BC. (Two other books, Roma: The Novel of Ancient Rome (2007) and Empire: The Novel of Imperial Rome (2010) are generational epics from Early to Imperial Rome through to 141 AD and the rule of Hadrian. Those books do not feature Gordianus.) These are absolutely wonderful books, and I have read them all (though prior to my Amazon reviewing, so I have not yet reviewed them).

At the end of The Seven Wonders Gordianus had brought a slave, Bethesda (little knowing how closely linked her future and his were to be, as we know from the later chronological Gordianus books). Now, in 88 BC Gordianus is living in Alexandria and has just celebrated his 22nd birthday. As he tells us in the first sentence of the book, “I had a long list of things I wanted to do, but taking part in a raid to steal the golden sarcophagus of Alexander the Great had never been among them.”

Where the chronologically later Gordianus books take us into the depths of the narrow streets and lanes of Republican Rome and its environs, these latest two books have taken us into Egypt – through the dusty streets of Alexandria and down the Nile, and in this latest book across the Delta with only a streetwise young slave called Djet and a vaguely amenable camel for friendly company. Gordianus’s tale of how he came to be robbing the tomb of Alexander the Great is a great story; full of people good and bad, death, disaster and general mayhem as Gordianus seeks to solve his own mystery and stay alive.

These books are great; the narrative is in the first person of Gordianus, as he takes us through his actions and thought processes to solve mysteries and bring some semblance of justice to situations he finds himself in. The action is always racing along, and there is always an element of wit; in these books set in Gordianus’s earlier life there is a bit of refreshing naivety in Gordianus which cycnicism wears away as he gets older in the later chronological books. I love the way the author has given us a glimpse into these early worlds; colours, sights, sounds, people, customs and a way of life that is so alien to us. Gordianus is a great central character, and I look forward to many more of his adventures.


Star Trek: The Original Series: The Weight of Worlds by Greg Cox (Mar 26 2013)
Star Trek: The Original Series: The Weight of Worlds by Greg Cox (Mar 26 2013)

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars The Weight of Worlds, 26 April 2015
This is a really solid, classic Original Series type Star Trek novel, by an established ST author, Greg Box. On Ephrata IV, at the Ephrata Institute, the study of learning is paramount, and many and varied races live and work there. When the Institute is seemingly attacked by those who want to spread the way of ‘Truth’, the Enterprise speeds to their assistance. Kirk and Spock find themselves separate from the rest of the landing team and in the thick of the Crusade of the Truth, while Uhurua must step up to a position she never really wanted to have to fill, and Sulu has to fight the Crusade from within.

Kirk, Spock, McCoy, Uhura, Sulu and the classic team are all well portrayed in the story as the teams must work in their own isolated arenas to set things right, and to save those on Ephrata IV. I like the way the author separated the groups into their own mini-adventures within the greater story. The characters are very well written and portrayed in this book, and the resulting adventure is an undemanding but very rewarding classic Original Series Star Trek novel.
Comment Comments (4) | Permalink | Most recent comment: Apr 27, 2015 7:50 AM BST


Star Trek: The Original Series: The Weight of Worlds by Cox, Greg (3/26/2013)
Star Trek: The Original Series: The Weight of Worlds by Cox, Greg (3/26/2013)

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars The Weight of Worlds, 26 April 2015
This is a really solid, classic Original Series type Star Trek novel, by an established ST author, Greg Box. On Ephrata IV, at the Ephrata Institute, the study of learning is paramount, and many and varied races live and work there. When the Institute is seemingly attacked by those who want to spread the way of ‘Truth’, the Enterprise speeds to their assistance. Kirk and Spock find themselves separate from the rest of the landing team and in the thick of the Crusade of the Truth, while Uhurua must step up to a position she never really wanted to have to fill, and Sulu has to fight the Crusade from within.

Kirk, Spock, McCoy, Uhura, Sulu and the classic team are all well portrayed in the story as the teams must work in their own isolated arenas to set things right, and to save those on Ephrata IV. I like the way the author separated the groups into their own mini-adventures within the greater story. The characters are very well written and portrayed in this book, and the resulting adventure is an undemanding but very rewarding classic Original Series Star Trek novel.


[ The Weight of Worlds ] [ THE WEIGHT OF WORLDS ] BY Cox, Greg ( AUTHOR ) Apr-12-2013 Paperback
[ The Weight of Worlds ] [ THE WEIGHT OF WORLDS ] BY Cox, Greg ( AUTHOR ) Apr-12-2013 Paperback
by Greg Cox
Edition: Paperback

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars The Weight of Worlds, 26 April 2015
This is a really solid, classic Original Series type Star Trek novel, by an established ST author, Greg Box. On Ephrata IV, at the Ephrata Institute, the study of learning is paramount, and many and varied races live and work there. When the Institute is seemingly attacked by those who want to spread the way of ‘Truth’, the Enterprise speeds to their assistance. Kirk and Spock find themselves separate from the rest of the landing team and in the thick of the Crusade of the Truth, while Uhurua must step up to a position she never really wanted to have to fill, and Sulu has to fight the Crusade from within.

Kirk, Spock, McCoy, Uhura, Sulu and the classic team are all well portrayed in the story as the teams must work in their own isolated arenas to set things right, and to save those on Ephrata IV. I like the way the author separated the groups into their own mini-adventures within the greater story. The characters are very well written and portrayed in this book, and the resulting adventure is an undemanding but very rewarding classic Original Series Star Trek novel.


The Weight of Worlds (Star Trek: The Original Series) by Cox. Greg ( 2013 ) Mass Market Paperback
The Weight of Worlds (Star Trek: The Original Series) by Cox. Greg ( 2013 ) Mass Market Paperback

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars The Weight of Worlds, 26 April 2015
This is a really solid, classic Original Series type Star Trek novel, by an established ST author, Greg Box. On Ephrata IV, at the Ephrata Institute, the study of learning is paramount, and many and varied races live and work there. When the Institute is seemingly attacked by those who want to spread the way of ‘Truth’, the Enterprise speeds to their assistance. Kirk and Spock find themselves separate from the rest of the landing team and in the thick of the Crusade of the Truth, while Uhurua must step up to a position she never really wanted to have to fill, and Sulu has to fight the Crusade from within.

Kirk, Spock, McCoy, Uhura, Sulu and the classic team are all well portrayed in the story as the teams must work in their own isolated arenas to set things right, and to save those on Ephrata IV. I like the way the author separated the groups into their own mini-adventures within the greater story. The characters are very well written and portrayed in this book, and the resulting adventure is an undemanding but very rewarding classic Original Series Star Trek novel.


The Weight of Worlds (Star Trek: The Original Series) by Cox, Greg (2013)
The Weight of Worlds (Star Trek: The Original Series) by Cox, Greg (2013)
by Greg Cox
Edition: Mass Market Paperback

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars The Weight of Worlds, 26 April 2015
This is a really solid, classic Original Series type Star Trek novel, by an established ST author, Greg Box. On Ephrata IV, at the Ephrata Institute, the study of learning is paramount, and many and varied races live and work there. When the Institute is seemingly attacked by those who want to spread the way of ‘Truth’, the Enterprise speeds to their assistance. Kirk and Spock find themselves separate from the rest of the landing team and in the thick of the Crusade of the Truth, while Uhurua must step up to a position she never really wanted to have to fill, and Sulu has to fight the Crusade from within.

Kirk, Spock, McCoy, Uhura, Sulu and the classic team are all well portrayed in the story as the teams must work in their own isolated arenas to set things right, and to save those on Ephrata IV. I like the way the author separated the groups into their own mini-adventures within the greater story. The characters are very well written and portrayed in this book, and the resulting adventure is an undemanding but very rewarding classic Original Series Star Trek novel.
Comment Comments (3) | Permalink | Most recent comment: Apr 27, 2015 11:02 AM BST


The Weight of Worlds (Star Trek: The Original Series)
The Weight of Worlds (Star Trek: The Original Series)
by Greg Cox
Edition: Mass Market Paperback
Price: £6.99

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars The Weight of Worlds, 26 April 2015
This is a really solid, classic Original Series type Star Trek novel, by an established ST author, Greg Box. On Ephrata IV, at the Ephrata Institute, the study of learning is paramount, and many and varied races live and work there. When the Institute is seemingly attacked by those who want to spread the way of ‘Truth’, the Enterprise speeds to their assistance. Kirk and Spock find themselves separate from the rest of the landing team and in the thick of the Crusade of the Truth, while Uhurua must step up to a position she never really wanted to have to fill, and Sulu has to fight the Crusade from within.

Kirk, Spock, McCoy, Uhura, Sulu and the classic team are all well portrayed in the story as the teams must work in their own isolated arenas to set things right, and to save those on Ephrata IV. I like the way the author separated the groups into their own mini-adventures within the greater story. The characters are very well written and portrayed in this book, and the resulting adventure is an undemanding but very rewarding classic Original Series Star Trek novel.
Comment Comments (2) | Permalink | Most recent comment: Apr 26, 2015 9:21 PM BST


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