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Kim Slater (Nottingham)

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Play Dead: A gripping serial killer thriller (Detective Kim Stone crime thriller series Book 4)
Play Dead: A gripping serial killer thriller (Detective Kim Stone crime thriller series Book 4)
Price: £1.99

5.0 out of 5 stars This series just gets better!, 31 May 2016
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Another cracking read from Angela Marsons. Great characterisation, gripping narrative with lots of building tension and a twist in the tale . . . and of course another dose of our rough-edged but lovable uber-cop, Kim Stone. If you haven't discovered this brilliant series, then what are you waiting for??


Lost Girls: Volume 3 (Detective Kim Stone crime thriller series)
Lost Girls: Volume 3 (Detective Kim Stone crime thriller series)
by Angela Marsons
Edition: Paperback
Price: £9.99

5.0 out of 5 stars Pure Genius!, 12 Nov. 2015
A fantastic third instalment of the thrilling crime series by Angela Marsons. DI Kim Stone is a hard cop with a deeply-buried soft centre. She runs no-nonsense investigations with her sidekick, Bryant, that keep the reader guessing from start to finish.
Lost Girls’ great plot and effective characterisation makes for a really pacy, enjoyable read. Here, you have the kind of book you can’t wait to get back to throughout the working day. I enjoyed twists, turns and even tears . . . pure genius!


Some Kind of Fairy Tale
Some Kind of Fairy Tale
Price: £4.99

0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A Wonderful Tale!, 9 Aug. 2012
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I absolutely loved this book, couldn't put it down. From the amazing description of the landscape that gives such a vivid sense of place, to the lavish and poetic language used throughout, the reader is held captive by the narrative. The down-to-earth quality that Joyce gives his characters makes the fantasy world that threads through the novel all the more believable. The story is told from the point-of-view of a number of characters - some might say too many - yet it works and keeps the reader turning the pages. As with his last excellent book, The Silent Land, this one explores themes of love and loss. WARNING: be prepared to keep thinking about it long after reading the last page...highly recommended!


A Dog Called Homeless
A Dog Called Homeless
Price: £2.99

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A Fabulous Read!, 31 July 2012
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An uplifting, deceptively powerful story that takes the reader through a heart-stopping array of emotions. Sarah Lean's uncomplicated and pacy writing style had me devouring this Kindle purchase within a couple of days. The author tackles some difficult issues in a sensitive yet original way and manages to rouse compassion for all the characters. A Dog called Homeless is a fabulous read for all ages. It made me smile, made me cry....result! Highly recommended.


What You Don't Know (Bone & Cane 2)
What You Don't Know (Bone & Cane 2)

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Highly Recommended and Gripping Thriller!, 12 Jan. 2012
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Having really enjoyed the first book in this series 'Bone and Cane', I was unsure whether David Belbin's follow-up novel would be as thrilling a read but I needn't have worried. 'What you Don't Know' is a gripping, realistic thriller set on the mean streets of Nottingham.
The characters of Sarah Bone, Minister and Nick Cane, Drugs Worker, are developed further so, with this book, readers get a sense of really getting to know who they are. Although I recommend everyone to read the excellent first book in the series, people shouldn't worry reading out of order as all the characters' pasts are summarised, giving a handy reminder for continuing readers, too.
What I really enjoyed about this book were the twists and turns and there were certainly a few surprises for me towards the end. The writing is excellent and the subject matter sometimes grim but necessary to get a flavour of the world the characters inhabit.
As I am not a politics enthusiast, I sometimes found the passages describing political procedure a little daunting but never too much. Indeed, I did learn a lot, as I did with the first book. Someone who has a natural interest in this area would relish the informed descriptions of the House of Commons goings-on and it served to illustrate the divide between two worlds.
I am already wondering how one or two of the tantalising storylines are going to resolve themselves...bring on book three!


The Bestseller: A psychological thriller that will keep you guessing
The Bestseller: A psychological thriller that will keep you guessing
Price: £1.99

7 of 9 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A Great Read!, 19 Dec. 2011
Enjoyed this fast-paced thriller, The Bestseller is a great read. I won't labour valid points already fully explored in these reviews, eg; Kindle overkill, slightly predictable ending. Any budding writers can do worse than take note of the great writing advice within the text. Lots of people are comparing this novella to The Basement...difficult not to do considering the similarities and the fact the characters actually discuss it in The Bestseller. The Basement was a 5* in my opinion and The Bestseller doesn't quite match up - but is still worth buying, without doubt. The vast majority of Leather's writing is excellent, he is a bit of a trailblazer in trying new and different things. Some will work, some not and I can accept that as a risk because, in my opinion, he usually succeeds in giving the reader more than their money's worth.


Mile 81: A Stephen King eBook Original Short Story featuring an excerpt from his bestselling novel 11.22.63
Mile 81: A Stephen King eBook Original Short Story featuring an excerpt from his bestselling novel 11.22.63
Price: £1.99

16 of 20 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Blame the Editor!, 10 Sept. 2011
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King is so legendary that criticising his writing feels like questioning your doctor or correcting your kid's teacher. Sometimes, though, it has to be done. And I'm sure he gets very tired of being surrounded by sycophants, don't you think?
I love the early King books but haven't been keen since `From a Buick 8', if I'm honest. But King generally pens a good short story so I pre-ordered `Mile 81' on my Kindle. I liked the start of the tale, King is fond of - and good at - putting teenage boys together and observing the dynamic that runs between them.
`Mile 81' has car/unidentified demon horror running through it...we like. The story ends in such a way that it might happen to someone else....maybe even us or that annoying neighbour with the dog that barks at 3 am. We like this more because we know it won't really. King satisfies on a number of fronts in the story, he gives us what we know and love...some of the time.
However, King has an infuriating habit of clarifying what he says in brackets, like he doesn't trust the reader to get it first time. He's always done it to some extent but outdoes himself in `Mile 81' to the detriment of the story. When our young hero Pete skulks round the abandoned truck stop, we are told that Pete is careful not to run his bike tyres over any broken glass. Okay, fine....we understand. We don't need - (in brackets) - `there was a lot of it on this side of the fence'. When Pete lifts his bag, which holds a bottle of vodka, up onto a loading dock, King goes on to explain - (in brackets) - `being especially careful on account of the half-full vodka bottle'. It's okay! Stop fretting Legendary One! We remembered what was in the bag because you told us that just a few pages ago. Two examples here of the countless occasions it happens in this one story. I think King is probably aiming for a conversational-type of storytelling but the brackets only serve to irritate and distract.
Short story rule: don't include anything that doesn't move the story along. So the reading tension wasn't particularly cranked up by details about Pete's ant-farm project and the grade his friend got for it at school. We can let that go, it's Stephen King. The rules don't apply to him, right?
When Pete finally gets inside the disused restaurant, he wanders around looking at stained mattresses and posters of naked women constantly laughing, giggling....laughing and giggling....laughing and giggling....OVER AND OVER AGAIN!! Yep, he's a young lad, stuff makes him laugh and giggle. We got it the first few times.
So, a good start, over-waffling in the middle section where scary stuff happens and then quite suddenly, the whole dilemma is resolved and the story is finished. And what's strange is that our hero is never in danger, he sleeps through the whole thing....so why make us care about him in the first place?? With better editing and pacing, the story could have been great. Instead it was just okay. But I'd almost forgive Mr King anything....and I'd never criticise him to his face.
Comment Comments (7) | Permalink | Most recent comment: Sep 1, 2014 5:04 PM BST


The Truth about Celia Frost
The Truth about Celia Frost
by Paula Rawsthorne
Edition: Paperback
Price: £6.99

0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Great Read!, 31 Aug. 2011
This is an accomplished debut novel that keeps the reader turning the page. Suitable for readers of all ages from young adult onwards, the author keeps on building the tension about Celia's mysterious medical condition throughout the narrative. Believable characters, most of whom, despite their shortcomings, garner the reader's compassion to one extent or another. The protagonist, Celia, is a plucky young girl who has zero self-pity, even though her personal circumstances pull at the reader's heartstrings from the beginning. The author somehow manages to construct a pacy thriller with comic interludes which is no mean feat. This book is tense, funny and skilfully tackles difficult issues. Recommended!


Hard Landing (The 1st Spider Shepherd Thriller)
Hard Landing (The 1st Spider Shepherd Thriller)
Price: £0.99

3 of 6 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Exciting Read!, 31 July 2011
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Really enjoyed this great fast-paced thriller I bought for an unbelievable bargain price of 49p on Kindle. Leather's writing is generally good and he is great at keeping the reader turning the page. Really enjoyed the prison setting, wasn't so keen on the setting and technical details in the final part of the novel but guess that had to be done in order to create a satisfying ending. I fully intend to read the no. 2 in the Spider Shepherd series. Recommended!


Bone and Cane
Bone and Cane
by David Belbin
Edition: Paperback

44 of 51 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Thrilling Read!, 19 Mar. 2011
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This review is from: Bone and Cane (Paperback)
Really enjoyed this well-paced novel set in Nottingham and around political events unfolding in the late nineties. A local Labour MP, Sarah Bone, is instrumental in the release of Ed Clark, a man imprisoned for a double murder. His release is received with mixed reactions and Bone finds herself struggling to sustain her political seat and deal with various, often dangerous, confrontations, on a number of fronts. Bone begins to seriously doubt Ed's innocence. On top of it all, an old flame from her past resurfaces after a long and mysterious absence.

The main characters, Sarah Bone and Nick Cane are very believable and I learned a lot about local election campaigns through the storyline without realising it until I'd finished the book - the mark of a good storyteller. Living in Nottingham myself I enjoyed the references to the city locations, it made the read very authentic. Belbin skilfully crafts the characters so they soon become well-rounded and believable and we start to care what happens to them. The tension builds throughout on several levels, culminating in a satisfying, although not altogether unexpected, ending. Would definitely read a sequel to this book.


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