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Lucy Skywalker (Glastonbury, UK)

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The Missing Years Of Jesus: The Extraordinary Evidence that Jesus Visited the British Isles: The Greatest Story Never Told
The Missing Years Of Jesus: The Extraordinary Evidence that Jesus Visited the British Isles: The Greatest Story Never Told
by Dennis Price
Edition: Hardcover

4.0 out of 5 stars Meticulous, original, stimulating: but the subtitle's superlatives are inaccurate, 11 July 2016
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I am somewhat paraphrasing Morgaine's review, because she says so much I agree with:

Dennis spent over ten years visiting Stonehenge up to three times a week, and attending all the open Solstice celebrations. He spent four years working with experts on Stonehenge, and the A303 Stonehenge Test Pit Project, and he was closely involved with the 2002 discovery of the Amesbury Archer, and the 2003 discovery of the Boscombe Bowmen. He's often to be seen talking with the archaeologists there and providing original information on Stonehenge.

This is all good validation of Dennis' expertise.

Dennis then approaches his research in highly original way, treating this as a 2,000 year old `missing persons' case. His method and thinking are meticulous, and yet this book is a great read. Dennis tracks down fascinating clues in the New Testament that make very compelling evidence once they're identified, pieced together and placed into context. Next, he explores the landscape and features of the West of England, bringing into play many archaeological insights about the regions in which the legends place Jesus. Finally, he profiles the prominent individuals and groups who may hold value in this search for the truth. A clear differentiation is made between plain facts, archaeological conclusions, assumptions based on circumstantial evidence and personal opinions. No attempt is made to hide supposition within more solid points to justify a theory. He does not choose to use hidden or disputed sources and the integrity of this approach makes the conclusions of the book all the more convincing.

I too am left wondering why no archaeologist or churchman has investigated this subject this carefully in this kind of way before. No, it has not been done before. I am left wondering at the superficiality of some of the reviews here, which miss the importance of thoroughness, and of working from indisputable evidence and from a intelligently commonsensical grasp of human nature, in order to justify extraordinary conclusions. If his conclusions then sound dogmatic and unproven and wild if taken out of context, this seems to merely show the inability of the reviewer to grasp the meticulous care that has gone into the journey of proof.

As a Christian with Druid sympathy, I've always been interested in stories of ancient Britain and this stands alongside the best - yes, alongside Gordon Strachan and Carmina Gadelica. It is just different, the music has a different beat.

The one thing missing is appreciation of the corpus of legends and evidence of Jesus travelling East, both before his work in Israel and after - yes, after - the Crucifixion and Resurrection. Look at the work of Holger Kersten for starters. Add the Aquarian Gospel, the Book with Fourteen Seals, and Anna the Grandmother of Jesus, for perspective. Watch the DVD "Jesus in India" concerning years he spent in Jaganath, before the age of 30. There is a great deal of evidence, if one looks carefully.

My impression is that Jesus' journeys west took place between the age of 12/13 and about 20. Up to that age, he was also a student, as "ben Joseph" together with "ben Zacharias", in the Essene community of Qumran, according to another extraordinary account, "Jesus and the Essenes". Feared discovery of his Essene connections is another reason it could have been seen as good to have Jesus travel far away after revealing how (uncomfortably) deep his understanding already went.


Wonder Of Unicorns Game: Play for Personal and Planetary Healing
Wonder Of Unicorns Game: Play for Personal and Planetary Healing
by Diana Cooper
Edition: Paperback
Price: £14.99

5.0 out of 5 stars Great new kind of game, 9 April 2016
Best with four players, there are 44 unicorn cards from which three players each select six to start helping the fourth player answer his question. It uses a combination of divination (the selection of cards), intuition and imagination, and draws on a lovely clear source of wisdom sent direct by the unicorns themselves. If you don't believe in any of this, don't play the game - but you will miss a precious experience which has practical usefulness.

I played it with someone who "never plays games" but was entranced by this one - because it worked - it is a new way of "playing games" with a timeless spiritual message. It is a great way to explore personal challenges, difficulties, practical problems, illness, at pretty deep levels to find resolution, inspiration, "the way forward" - whatever you need. It is both fun and sacred. You commit to working "for my own highest good and for the highest good of all" so you need to find one, two or three others who also are willing to engage in this way.

Didn't always resonate with the pictures but I can let go that level of imperfection.


No Title Available

5.0 out of 5 stars Perfect for my need, 11 Dec. 2015
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I feel the cold and sometimes have to take care. For the price, it does exactly what I needed, providing a very efficient layer underneath my outer coat. It covers my bum but is not as long as most outdoor coats. It is soft and thin enough to fit underneath easily, yet warm enough to work well. It also folds up incredibly neatly into a tiny bag, and expands gracefully on removal.


Across the Universe with John Lennon
Across the Universe with John Lennon
by Linda Keen
Edition: Paperback

5.0 out of 5 stars Forget the superficial review!, 13 Oct. 2015
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I am irritated enough with the one review on Amazon UK being by a superficial naysayer (and it says more about the reviewer than about the book) to take the liberty of copying the review at Amazon US by Tom Paine, who speaks with a lot more erudition, insight and humility - and he speaks for me.

"Forget the premise that this book is John Lennon speaking. Suspend any judgements you may have about what is reality and what is fantasy. There is more here than meets the eye, by a longshot. The information in this book reflects a separate reality that Linda Keen was not privy to prior to having "John Lennon" disclose it to her. Most people reading this book will not be aware of the "tradition" in esoteric knowledge of the "underground stream" of "Arcadia". There is one whole section in this book about a celestial realm called Arcadia. This tradition began almost 3500 years ago in the central Peloponnesia of Greece! The underground stream declares that there is a paradise where those who are in tune with the natural laws of the Universe go to. A principal aspect of this paradise are the "Tones" of the Celestial Spheres. A rather fitting place for John to retire to, one might say. The underground stream's most recent "awakening" began about 1430 AD in the small province of Lorrain in France. From that time on it has figured prominently in almost ALL of the music we have received from artists since that epoch. This is not common knowledge but knowledge readily available through other written resources. The fact that an author, a gifted teacher of intuitive development, (her and her husband ran a school in the Netherlands for pupils interested in researching this)has received this information from one of the greatest rock and roll personages of our age speaks volumes for an incredible "possibility". That is, the fact of Arcadia. I encourage any reader of this book to dig a little deeper in the knowledge being shared within it's pages. There is one more little "syncronicity". In this book, John mentions that we should follow the "blueprint rituals". HE does not say what these are. The week this book was released there was a website I heard about describing what the blueprint rituals are! The author of the website had no knowledge whatsoever of Linda Keen's book.... This book will begin an incredible journey for those who can see beyond the surface premise of John Lennon speaking directly to Linda. In fact, do not even think much about this, study the information and become "initiated". "


Da Vinci's Last Commission: The Most Sensational Detective Story in the History of Art
Da Vinci's Last Commission: The Most Sensational Detective Story in the History of Art
by Fiona McLaren
Edition: Hardcover
Price: £17.99

2 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Important book written with love and enthusiasm, 19 May 2015
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The reviews here are clearly divided, two-tailed. Having read thousands of Amazon reviews, I've found that this almost always indicates that there is some important truth in the book, whether or not that truth is surrounded by inferior material; and that this truth challenges academic norms. Actually this book is a gold mine, with a certain amount of detritus, which almost always happens when one strikes gold. The reviews from readers who love the book, and see it as a good treasure-hunt for truth, are too short to discern much. The more detailed critical reviews fail to notice the profusion of pearls in the "gush". At this point, I can do no better than point UK readers to the magnificent Amazon.com review by "Taxus" which beautifully says everything about just how special a book this is. Go to the bottom of the page here, just below all the reviews, and click the link to open up the American Amazon.com page of reviews.

For those that think that Taxus and I and other eulogisers are just gullible, and that the book has problems, please read on. I have some criticisms and they need a bit more explanation.

Fiona McLaren inherited an extraordinary gift from her father - actually a cache of related artefacts, of which the most significant is a beautiful and mysterious painting that some experts have estimated could be an unknown Da Vinci original, or at least have the master's hand on it. It was bequeathed to her father, a GP, by one of his patients, a high-ranking Mason. The fact that he bequeathed, to a non-Mason, what could well be his own most precious heritage, suggests volumes about the integrity of Fiona's father, and by association, her own integrity - which becomes clear as the book opens. For that, I can forgive her a lot - repetition and padding and stylistic weaknesses. She is a newcomer to the esoteric Christian truths she discovers, and not unsurprisingly is at times blown away by them.

The subject-matter of this book has much in common with the original book Holy Blood Holy Grail. When HBHG was first published, I refused to read it because I found the style sensationalist; yet twenty years later I found it sober, factual, absorbing, important, and well-written. With maturity and knowledge of our esoteric Christian traditions, I could better empathise and understand that what had once looked sensational was actually a toned-down, carefully-edited narration of discoveries that had originally been completely mind-blowing. It is natural, even necessary, to try to convey the journey and the excitement - as well as the methodical search for backup evidence - as well as the consideration of whether it all matters, and if so, how - and are there still more esoteric truths better left unsaid.

I believe that Truth matters, per se, and that we have an obligation to uphold the spirit of Truth. Jesus is reported in the Gospel of John as declaring that his own work was to "bear witness to truth". Surely if we are to follow him we should endeavour to do likewise. This just has to mean Research. It has to mean examining quantities of evidence and bringing to consciousness any prejudices in ourselves or in others that might impede the fair examination of evidence - just as is intended to happen in a court of law, and through Scientific Method. But for a journey of powerful personal spiritual discovery, the standards appropriate to Academia, Law and Science need to be modified (not relaxed but deeply and subtly modified).

The mind-blowing issues arise when evidence begins to emerge that suggests that Holy Church has not played fair, over the centuries. That Holy Church, while apparently endorsing Christ's words, has, in practice, attacked and silenced many who like Christ sought to "bear witness to truth". All too many then act in one of two ways that go to opposite extremes. I find extremes unacceptable but understandable. Some up their voice to maintain in effect that Holy Church has done no wrong, that academic consensus is correct, and that our familiar stories are the truth. Others flee and go silent or simply attack the Church. Few like Fiona are called to forge a middle way, to hang on in the Church, knowing the depth of its lies and misinformation but clinging to the essential Jesus, refusing to condemn, and holding out with stern love for Church reform in the light of truths increasingly unavoidable due to increasing weight of evidence.

Sure, I think that in some cases, Fiona has made extravagant guesses - and she herself would be the first to agree. But there is a great deal more to her material than mere extravagant guesses. There is, for instance, plenty of evidence that Mary Magdalene came to the South of France, and it is not just so-called "myths" - but here is not the place to open that up. On the other hand, there are problems in the painting that were not mentioned in the book though they seem quite obvious. Mary's left hand is severely arthritic, and her right hand is completely illogical, yet Leonardo always gets his figures comfortable and well-proportioned. Or does he? Could he have deliberately painted anomalous hands? For the "arthritic" fingers all point to one thing - the unusual second toe that Fiona discusses. Leonardo, working at the end of his life for King Francis, became paralysed in his right side. His students might have had to work on his paintings. Yet could there still be hidden messages in these strange hands whose anomalous proportions would surely be immediately apparent to any artist? Messages that Leonardo could only leave as his own death approached? That his pupils knew to convey?

Fiona has let me know that yes indeed, both hands are painted as they are with good reason; that this and much more will become clear in a follow-up book.


Coffeemate Creamer Gold 3g. Pack 50sachets
Coffeemate Creamer Gold 3g. Pack 50sachets
Offered by FOK SHOP
Price: £11.64

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars I carry these sachets when I travel around and only need one or two good hot teas or coffees when I'm out, 20 Feb. 2015
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I carry these sachets when I travel around and only need one or two good hot teas or coffees when I'm out. I hate black tea or coffee and cannot touch ordinary milk now. I didn't have to wait three weeks for delivery although mine came from Thailand. Unfortunately there is still some milk casein in these sachets but it's less than ordinary milk and I can cope though really want no milk at all.

CAN SOME MANUFACTURER START TO MAKE PURE SOYA SACHETS PLEASE?


Mystery of the Mazzaroth: Prophecy in the Constellations
Mystery of the Mazzaroth: Prophecy in the Constellations
by Tim Warner
Edition: Paperback
Price: £9.85

3.0 out of 5 stars I had great hopes for this book, 19 Feb. 2015
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I had great hopes for this book. All my research suggests that "mazzaroth", the Zodiac, was indeed of high and widely-understood but now-forgotten significance to the ancient Hebrew "chosen people" - that the "hosts of heaven" were seen as the "glory of God" that could speak to us at times. It was to be held sacred, as with the wine Abraham offered Melchizedek, and occasionally read as signs witnessing God's work (Gen.1:14), but not to be practiced compulsively as astrological prediction for everything, as with alcohol indulgence. There is a difference here which is both subtle and vital!

I appreciated the Bible quotes and they were relevant. But alas, after a hopeful start, I was disappointed. Pages 38-40 are about the "correct starting point" but the calculations there are very simply incorrect. Warner claims that in c.4000 BC the winter solstice was "between Leo and Virgo" but actually it was in Aquarius moving towards Pisces. On the next page he says that the sun was in Virgo at Rosh Hashanah, the Hebrew calendrical New Year dating back to a c.4000BC "Creation" - but actually it is more like Sagittarius. Two big mistakes - and then he goes on to claim a lot more, based on too little evidence.

Warner dismisses the work of Frances Rolleston on p.25, on the strength of a referenced dismissal which is grossly simplistic and unappreciative. Nevertheless, I don't want to totally dismiss or discourage him. I think he is on the right track - but needs to be a lot more scrupulous and careful with evidence. He needs to appreciate how similar what he is doing is to what Rolleston and Seiss were doing - sensing, and trying to draw out, the Bible story, glory, mystery, in the heavens! I believe they have much to teach him!

I think we have a way to go before we can claim our foundations are true and sound, in this area. But I like to look at work I may disagree with, when I feel it arises from a pure soul and has nuggets of truth. Witness to Truth is the work of our Lord, and thus it should surely be what we also aspire to. At its purest and best, this is what Science and Scientific Method are about. I respect the facts that Seiss was a well-respected preacher; and that Kepler, one of the founders of modern Science who first described accurately the paths of planets, was also a monk and an astrologer who was looking for God's perfect beauty in the heavens.

Have a look at one of my favourite books showing the beauty of the heavens, A Little Book of Coincidence.


The Celtic Connection: The Story of the Beginnings of Christianity in Ireland and Britain.
The Celtic Connection: The Story of the Beginnings of Christianity in Ireland and Britain.
by David N. Marshall
Edition: Paperback

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars The Celtic Sabbath Connection, 28 Nov. 2014
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Short book, mainly concerned to put in context the probably-true but generally-unknown thesis that the Celtic Church celebrated the "Sabbath" Saturday rather than Sunday - or both, with Saturday taking precedence. We see in this book strong evidence that "the Sabbath" was celebrated in the Celtic Church, and with good reasoning, for a long time; and that this dispute may have been what really lay behind the Synod of Whitby. Whitby was supposed to be about differences in the occasionally-different dating of Easter and the cut shape of tonsures - but these are such trivia. Perhaps "tonsure shape" and "Easter dating" came down in history for "those with ears to hear" to point to deeper issues that could not be spoken about.

I would say that Whitby was a dispute between the trivia merchants - the Roman Church feeling threatened by the continental expansion of Celtic Christianity - and those who took Jesus more seriously - the Celtic Church. Rome was bound to win eventually, at that point. Was there a cover-up of the fact that a deeper dispute was over Sabbath-Saturday versus Constantine's Roman Sunday? Did the notion have to be airbrushed out of the records, that there was even any question of celebrating Saturday? - lest any stupid and rebellious factions even get the idea that Saturday might matter, and that Saint Patrick might have always celebrated Saturday.

It was certainly useful to discover this evidence. Four stars for that alone.

My "lead" to this book was a clue about St Patrick at Lerins which I was very keen to chase up. The Internet kept telling me there was a reference to Lerins in a book by David Marshall. When the book arrived, I found that Lerins was footnoted to quotes from "Sun and Cross" by Jakob Streit - a far more widely interesting source of Celtic spirituality and its roots. St Germanus of Auxerre, who probably taught St Patrick for ten years before he went to Ireland, had also been to Lerins.


Solomon's Kitten
Solomon's Kitten
by Sheila Jeffries
Edition: Hardcover
Price: £8.99

6 of 6 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Magic puss cat, 27 Nov. 2014
This review is from: Solomon's Kitten (Hardcover)
This story keeps the utter magic of Solomon's Tale in a new story, different setting. I don't need to duplicate what others have said so very well about this beautiful book. It won't appeal to all - some may find it too sentimental, or fey, or unbelievable. I don't think any of this matters. It is truly a book from the heart, and a book for children of all ages - well, from 10 or 12 up. It handles matters around difficulty, despair, degradation, and death with great sensitivity, showing how magical light can shine through and help can come from the spiritual worlds even in our darkest moments.

Sheila writes "fiction" but I know she speaks not just from the heart but also from a lifetime of direct experience of realities she couldn't talk about for many years.

I remember we had a cat when I was three. She was blue. Actually she was not blue, she was a tabby, but at that age I am sure I saw her aura more strongly than her physical body. I'd just come out of hospital and refused to have anything to do with people, I only wanted Ploffa the pussy cat, so I was told later. Of course. Cats are natural healers.

My only query is the cover. Lovely design, but from the book I picture a Tallulah who is a much more silvery tabby with more white.


To Know as We are Known: Education as a Spiritual Journey
To Know as We are Known: Education as a Spiritual Journey
by Parker J. Palmer
Edition: Paperback
Price: £12.99

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars What a definition of teaching!, 27 Nov. 2014
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Here are the book's Contents:
1. Knowing Is Loving
2. Education as Spiritual Formation
3. The Teaching Behind the Teaching
4. What Is Truth?
5. To Teach Is to Create a Space . . .
6. . . . In Which Obedience to Truth Is Practiced
7. The Spiritual Formation of Teachers

"To teach is to create a space . . . in which Obedience to Truth is practiced" - this is the most stunning aphorism of teaching I've ever encountered. For that alone I would award five stars.

This is a much-needed statement that redeems the heart of teaching in a materialistic, state-dependent educational setup. This book gently and powerfully leads us to reconnect with our own lost / forgotten / unnoticed / denied / hidden heart. Only out of such a place of love of honesty and truth can one grow in understanding and stature as a teacher, keep studying the universe with passion - and keep sharing the precious journey of discovery with integrity.


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