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Normann Aaboe Nielsen (Odder Denmark)

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The Hobbit
The Hobbit
by J. R. R. Tolkien
Edition: Mass Market Paperback

12 of 15 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The book that started it all..., 29 Sept. 2001
This review is from: The Hobbit (Mass Market Paperback)
Naturally you wouldn't expect this book to be of the same richness than "The Lord of the Ring" (LOTR). This was after all the first book, not even meant to be published, right?
Wrong! Although some reviewers are a bit tired of the tedious / boring descriptions of the country and the juvenile ("childish") way of Tolkiens prose in this book, they should not be fooled. At the time when this book was written Tolkien had already a very great part of his mythology ready. When you read this book you whould look for the minor hints and references to things that the narrator doesn't know.
As an example: Why do Gandalf need to leave the dwarves and one hobbit before they enter Mirkwood? The reason is NOT that he want them to have their journey for them selves - but instead that he has to attend to the White Council where the identity of the Necromancer is determined. But this the narrator of "The Hobbit" does not know!
Fascinating! And of course: The Ring! With all our knowledge we find that Bilbo is very lucky indeed - and that includes both his meeting with Gollum but also the battles with Smaug, Orcs and the passing through Mirkwood.
We must see "The Hobbit" in the context of LOTR in order to perceive the depts of it. And as such the book is a worthy prelude to the great story!


The Silmarillion
The Silmarillion
by J. R. R. Tolkien
Edition: Paperback

8 of 9 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The mythology needed for LOTR, 29 Sept. 2001
This review is from: The Silmarillion (Paperback)
As any reader of LOTR and even The Hobbit know there is a whole world underlying the well-known stories. When somebody in the books for example refers to Elbereth or to the downcast of Numenor then the reader is not actually told what this is about - we must accept that there is a foundation of religion and history that we do not know about. Of course the appendices help - but even Tolkien was aware that they could only bring a little light. Actually he wanted to have both the LOTR and the Silmarilion as one publication.
For the reader that is seriously interrested in the mythology behind LOTR and some of the history, this is where to start looking. One must be aware however that the book is seeing the history from the Elvish point of view - there is not much about hobbits here, but quite a lot about how the world was created. The text is fragmented (no doubt by the author's purpose!) so that it looks quite in the same way as a REAL (i.e.: Our world) mythology. This makes it very hard to read and it cannot be digested in a week or two. But it is a MUST for the advanced Tolkien fan!


The Art of Computer Programming: v. 1-3: Vol 1-3 (Series in Computer Science & Information Processing)
The Art of Computer Programming: v. 1-3: Vol 1-3 (Series in Computer Science & Information Processing)
by Donald E. Knuth
Edition: Hardcover

14 of 32 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars 42!, 13 Jan. 2001
These are Holy Writings - the knowledge will surely percolate out of the Book(s) and influence all other computer books around in you bookshelf. Reading is difficult, but fullfilling. And if you're planning to be recognized as a Computer Scientist these Books are mandatory.


Ender's Game (Ender Saga)
Ender's Game (Ender Saga)
by Orson Scott Card
Edition: Paperback

0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A very human science fiction story!, 11 Oct. 2000
Whatever they are, they are still kids - but terrifying too! The best, most highly intelligent breeds, tested and re-tested for the one purpose: The battle.
And so it is: Even when you are a kid with an almost super-natural high intelligence, with a complete grasp of the cncepts of battling and access to all human knowledge you are still human! You must still have someone to love, even if it is your enemy. You need compassion and you can radiate emphaty.
This is a very strong book, displaying the warm beating human heart in the land of hard science fiction. Much much better than the original short story.


Basic Mixing Techniques
Basic Mixing Techniques
by Paul White
Edition: Paperback
Price: £5.99

43 of 50 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Idea good - but need editing badly!, 20 Sept. 2000
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
I was looking for a cheap book with hints on how to do a good mix of vocals and other instruments. As I already had two other books by Paul White I thought that he might treat the subject fairly. Well, almost - but not quite!
The problem of this book is not White's competence in the field - that seems to be good enough. And I already know that he can write. But this book has several editing flaws! As an example, pg. 56 refers to a figure 8.5 that doesn't exist - notice, there is no figure in the book showing what the text says it should, so the figure is lacking altogether! The paragraph "pre-planning MIDI" shows also symptoms of bad editing as the only place in the text mentioning anything about MIDI is the headline - the rest of that paragraph talks about tapes and overdubs. No doubt relevant, but not what the heading said...
I would have give the book more stars, but not before a better edited version comes out. Until then I would recommend other books.


Basic MIDI
Basic MIDI
by Paul White
Edition: Paperback
Price: £6.50

20 of 22 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A very good introduction, 14 Sept. 2000
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This review is from: Basic MIDI (Paperback)
Many books have already been written about MIDI and how to connect things and instruments to let the music flow. This book does perhaps not offer many new things, but it is competent and inspiring. Effort has been done in making the book easy to understand and easy to carry around (due to its handy size) so that any wannabe musician can bring it to the music store without fear of making a fool of himself.
I could have wanted some real or good examples of the different ways that some synth modules have to be programmed, knowing that they are quite more complex than good is. However, the book - held as an introduction - is quite good.


Basic Digital Recording
Basic Digital Recording
by Paul White
Edition: Paperback
Price: £5.99

48 of 51 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A good book for it's price!, 14 Sept. 2000
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
Having a home studio today is easy enough: It's just a matter of assembling the instruments you can play, set up a couple of mikes and hook up a mixer to the casettedeck, and then start the gig. But listening to the hiss and noise afterwards, coming from the dreaded tape one figures that perhaps a digital recording would have been better. Finding the right equipment to do the digital recording worth the money that you have is difficult - to say the least! What should you look for, what can you expect of the quality. For Heavens sake, how does it work?
Paul White has been there all right! He saved me the money of getting a too expensive ADAT recorder - I bought a MiniDisc instead! Because, after reading his book and focusing on my wants and needs I was able to tell the difference. Also, setup of MIDI-studios and "stuff like that" is explained good enough to get started. Good book, written by a guy who knows!


Tales from the White Hart
Tales from the White Hart
by Arthur C. Clarke
Edition: Paperback

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A very funny book!, 22 Aug. 2000
There is not so much to add to the fact that this is a great and VERY funny collection of short-stories, from the days when Clarke was a master of sci-fi. Go buy it!


2001: A Space Odyssey
2001: A Space Odyssey
by Arthur C. Clarke
Edition: Paperback
Price: £8.99

0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The ultimate!, 4 Aug. 2000
This review is from: 2001: A Space Odyssey (Paperback)
When director Kubrik wanted to do the "really good science fiction movie" he had the short story "The Sentinel" by Clarke in mind. I thinkt that what Kubrik needed was and open-end story, bringing the story of mankind in perspective: We know something of our origin - but what do we evolve to be? Do Man has a piece of God in him or are we animals with intelligence? When hearing the first notes from the movie and recognizing them to be R.Strauss' "Also Spracht Zarathustra", the hymn to Nietzche's philosophical masterpiece about the Übermensch we should NOT be in doubt of what the movie is about: The rising of Man from ape to god.
This is what the movie is about. The book was written together with the movie, so it is no wonder that the book explains weak spots in the film and vice-versa, but what is more important is that the book does not deal with the same thema as the movie! Clarke is the technologican - the mechanic wizard. Although he actually invents a god-like creature in the novell (the computer HAL) that is not his idea. Clarke does not seem to recognize what the movie is about (read the book Lost Worlds of 2001). He actually believe the book to be about a space trip to some planet where there is a machine to be investigated - how dull!
But never mind what Clarke thinks (and this is the prime mover for his later books 2010, 2061 and 3001)! This is a book AND movie about the human race developing to be God.


3001: The Final Odyssey
3001: The Final Odyssey
by Arthur C. Clarke
Edition: Paperback
Price: £8.99

4.0 out of 5 stars Now here is a science fiction novell!, 4 Aug. 2000
After some years of bad writing, Clarke seems to be back in orbit. It is a nice touch to revive Frank Poole to let a voice from the 2nd. millennium comment on the 3rd. There are many good things in this novell, already mentioned by others - and my main point for this serial ("give me back the magic!") is almost there.
However, there are weak points! Were should be talking 1000 years ahead in the technological future. This is not the case. Except perhaps for the reactionless drive (something already discussed in Rendezvous with RAMA) the tech stuff can only be seen to be some fifty or 100 years from now. That religions should disappear like that is not credible, nor is the ending of the monolith with a computer virus plausible (I can emulate a computer on a different physical one, but giving the emulated computer a virus will not bring the physical down!). And why should it be impossible for the 3rd. millennium people with their tech. to land on 1G-planets after a long time in lower G's? Doesn't fit to me... There are other glitches in Clarke's foresights, but mainly: The book is a good science fiction book. Just don't relate it to "2001"...


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