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Oxford Handbook of Urology 3/e (Flexicover) (Oxford Medical Handbooks)
Oxford Handbook of Urology 3/e (Flexicover) (Oxford Medical Handbooks)
by John Reynard
Edition: Flexibound
Price: £31.49

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Review from Urology News, Jul/Aug 13, 5 Feb. 2015
The Oxford Medical Handbooks have always impressed me for how accessible and easy to understand they are, whilst also having an impressive amount of detail. This very much applies to this third edition of the Oxford Handbook of Urology. Firstly the book has an excellent layout with common and important topics broken down into sensible headings. It is very easy to find what you need within the book and there is an appropriate distribution of detail with common topics being thoroughly explained. There can be difficulty in making such a concise textbook for a broad topic. One would expect the use of bullet points to display copious amounts of information within a handbook. However, although the Oxford Handbook of Urology does utilise tables for relevant data, it also promotes an understanding of topics through easy to read and to-the-point summaries. An example of this is the comprehensive table of prostate cancer staging, followed by succinct explanations of the management and outcomes of the different stages. The core topics are covered with surprising detail for a handbook. On top of this there is coverage of topics relevant for the practice of urology such as basic renal physiology and how to communicate effectively with patients, making a very rounded and complete handbook for this field. This is an ideal introduction for junior doctors into the specialty. There is a particularly nice section on urological surgery and equipment. This includes pictures and explanations of equipment used in theatres, perfect for improving a junior doctor’s understanding and comfort within a theatre environment. It also has summaries of operations commonly performed. Within these are indications and the complications of each, reinforcing not only how each is done but also when and why it should be done, and what to be aware of afterwards. For a senior urologist it has all the important updates in urological current evidence, conducive for excellent evidence-based practice. As a trainee this book will be invaluable to me.


Management of Prostate Cancer (Current Clinical Urology)
Management of Prostate Cancer (Current Clinical Urology)
by Eric A Klein
Edition: Paperback

4.0 out of 5 stars Review from Urology News, May/Jun 2013, 5 Feb. 2015
There are countless numbers of books published about prostate cancer and its management. Most have little that can be said to be inaccurate or incomplete. But that doesn’t mean they are a particularly good read or worthy of your hard earned currency. This book is worthy on both accounts. The distracters are undoubtedly the quality of the writing and the balanced discussion, which is based on a comprehensive and up-to-date assimilation of available data. And this is what this text does particularly well. It covers (as you might expect) all aspects of current treatment modalities with a casual aplomb. The chapters are accessible and readable with key points highlighted above the background noise. However, the real triumph of this text is the coverage of less well-defined issues such as that relating to chemoprevention, active surveillance and the pitfalls of androgen deprivation therapy. The chapter on PSA screening was particularly well dealt with and lacked the anticipated North American bias. The issue was dealt with thoughtfully and with an impeccable reliance on the published evidence. Aspects relating to post-prostatectomy incontinence and the role of nomograms also deserve special mention. Occasionally some of the chapters (but very few indeed) felt like courtesy chapters (included for completeness) such as that which dealt with aspects of the genetics of prostate cancer. Efforts to define a high-risk population for screening on the basis of association studies would have been a useful addition. Nevertheless this should not detract from what is an impressive text and currently sits on my desk at home (and is certainly not there to park my coffee cup on).
Reviewed by: Tim Lane, Consultant Urological Surgeon, Lister Hospital, Stevenage.


Complications of Female Incontinence and Pelvic Reconstructive Surgery (Current Clinical Urology)
Complications of Female Incontinence and Pelvic Reconstructive Surgery (Current Clinical Urology)
Price: £139.18

5.0 out of 5 stars Review from Urology News, May/June 2013, 5 Feb. 2015
As a urologist frequently dealing with pelvic complications of surgery, I found this textbook an easy and informative read. Dr Goldman has put together a group of highly experienced experts in female incontinence and reconstruction. There are 20 chapters covering the complete spectrum of both common and rare complications encountered in female pelvic surgery. It offers useful insight on the prevention, investigation and management of these complications. This book is particularly timely in the light of recent global concerns about the placement of prosthetic mesh for pelvic reconstruction and incontinence. The opening chapter deals with general complications of pelvic reconstructive surgery and provides useful advice on dealing with an ageing population of patients with increasing co-morbidities. There is an excellent chapter on standardisation of complications using the Clavien Dindo system. I found the chapters on transvaginal mesh complications as well as pain complications of mesh surgery outstanding. Simple, clear anatomical drawings outline the aetiology and source of nerve injuries and neuropathies. I would recommend this book to all those surgeons involved in incontinence and pelvic reconstruction in females, particularly those surgeons who are likely to embark on reconstruction using mesh during their careers. It is becoming clear that mesh complications can occur many years after placement, and often on a recurrent basis. For young surgeons embarking on a career in this sub-speciality, the cornerstone of safe practice avoiding litigation is comprehensive, informed consent from the patient but also recognising complications early and managing them correctly. In most cases this will avoid or mitigate any long-term catastrophic sequelae. This book will allow readers to inform their patients about all the potential risks and side-effects of surgery, commonly performed to improve quality of life. As the famous philosopher George Santayana once quoted “those who cannot remember the past are condemned to repeat it”.
Reviewed by: Greg Boustead, Consultant Urological Surgeon & Clinical Director of Urology, Hertfordshire & South Bedfordshire Urological Cancer Centre, Lister Hospital.


A Diagnostic Atlas of Tumors of the Upper Aero-Digestive Tract: A Transnasal Video Endoscopic Approach
A Diagnostic Atlas of Tumors of the Upper Aero-Digestive Tract: A Transnasal Video Endoscopic Approach
by Tim Price
Edition: Hardcover
Price: £107.00

3.0 out of 5 stars Review from ENT & Audiology News, Jan/Feb 2013, volume 21, number 6, p112., 27 Jun. 2013
I was grateful to have received this book. Looking at the title I considered myself the intended audience; a new head and neck consultant keen to explore the role of transnasal laryngoesophagoscopy (TNLE). I found the first three chapters informative and was enlightened to read that I would need a high definition video recorder to analyse frame by frame the post cricoid and upper oesophagus. Having previously viewed real time examination of this area, I was dubious that this technique could assess this area well.
Thereafter the text moves away from TNLE and becomes an overview of head and neck tumours set out in individual chapters. The images remain those taken via TNLE, lacking in definition somewhat, but interesting to see how biopsies are possible with the technique. Unfortunately, despite contacting the publishing company, I have been unable to access the 13 online videos, which I am sure will benefit the reader. The chapters are well written and easy to read but are only detailed enough for surgeons in training. The information set out is unreferenced and unfortunately lacking in accuracy in places. For instance, the three chapters on oropharyngeal malignancies only briefly mention HPV as an "association" at a time when there is an epidemic of this particular disease.
After covering benign head and neck pathology the book then includes several chapters that are again, very interesting to someone such as myself: endolaryngeal laser surgery using TNLE, direct phonoplasty and tracheoesophageal puncture using TNLE. Following that there are further chapters on laryngectomy, free flap monitoring and surgical voice restoration. Finally there is a chapter on radiotherapy and chemoradiotherapy (in which post-operative radiotherapy following neck dissection should be given with 2 or more involved nodes, not 4 or more as stated).
In summary, I am little unsure as to who to recommend this text book to. There are several chapters which would make interesting reading for a head and neck specialist. However the majority of the book would be more suitable for trainee surgeons. Given this mixed audience, I would recommend this as a library text.

Mr James O'Hara, Department of Ear Nose and Throat, Sunderland Royal Hospital, Sunderland, UK.


Endoscopic Sinus Surgery: Optimizing Outcomes and Avoiding Failures
Endoscopic Sinus Surgery: Optimizing Outcomes and Avoiding Failures
by Rodney J. Schlosser and Richard J. Harvey
Edition: Hardcover
Price: £126.00

5.0 out of 5 stars Review from ENT & Audiology News, Jan/Feb 2013, volume 21, number 6, p111., 27 Jun. 2013
This is a great book, joining my list of books I wish I had written right at the top - it is a great credit to the authors, and will be of benefit to trainees and more experienced ESS surgeons alike. This does what it says on the tin - it will help to improve outcomes and avoid failures - it is full of useful tips, good quality images and relevant case studies.
The style of the book is very practically based, starting with the basics and moving on through the hard-to-treat cases that challenge us all. It gives a very nice model on the aetiology of CRS - the `CRS triangle' which is one of the most useful descriptions I've come across, and covers the role of medical therapy, adjuvant treatments and pre-and post operative care in a very accessible manner, summarised in each chapter with a `common pitfalls' and `author's principles of management', with graded recommendations. The highlight of the book is the chapter of proficient ESS. The authors' approach to defining fixed landmarks early on in the procedure will be of benefit to all ESS surgeons, and is accompanied by high quality images to support the text. The case studies in the final chapters are well selected to add to the basics covered in the earlier part of the book.
It's hard to be critical, but the only downside is that the book will be of less value for the trainee looking for a text to help them pass their exams, and is focused very much on surgical aspects of CRS management, without covering the broader spectrum of rhinology. However, it is not the intention of the authors to do so, and they highlight in the preface their aim to supplement the comprehensive reviews available with their experience, and that of their co-authors, to allow us all to improve our outcomes. I would strongly recommend it to anyone undertaking sinus surgery.

Claire Hopkins, DM, FRCS, (ORL-HNS), Consultant ENT Surgeon, Guy's and St Thomas', London, UK.


The Maxillary Sinus
The Maxillary Sinus
by James Duncavage
Edition: Hardcover
Price: £124.00

3.0 out of 5 stars Review from ENT & Audiology News, Jan/Feb 2013, volume 21, number 6, p110., 27 Jun. 2013
This review is from: The Maxillary Sinus (Hardcover)
I was intrigued when asked to review a book on just the maxillary sinus, wondering initially "but what about the rest of them?" To be honest, I'm still left with that thought having read the book, but it is a well written, beautifully illustrated book that is a credit to its authors. However, with a number of very high quality texts emerging that comprehensively cover sinus disease, I'm not sure who this will appeal to.
As expected, in a book dedicated to an isolated sinus, there is more detail than other texts allow. In particular, the `learning from a difficult case' chapters are particularly informative. However, in focusing on the maxillary sinus, the reader feels as if we are getting only part of the story. There is some repetition, as several authors cover the same topic from their own point of view, but also some conflicting advice. Having read the chapters on views from India, China and Japan, it is unclear whether they are discussing different phenotypes or simply different viewpoints on the same disease process. While it is great to have the opportunity to consider the alternatives, the overall feel is that the book is uncohesive. My final bugbear, despite a whole text devoted to the maxillary sinus, is that I still don't know the optimum size to create my middle meatalantrostomy. Does anyone? I'm not sure, but `not too far forward, and not too far back' left me feeling a little like Goldilocks! On a positive note, the quality of the videos is excellent, the `pearls' boxes are very useful, and the operative images are very good.
Overall, I think this is a book to borrow from the library, but if I was looking for a text to buy, it would be beaten by the new offerings from Harvey, Wormald or Hwang.

Ms Claire Hopkins, DM, FRCS, (ORL-HNS), Consultant ENT Surgeon, Guy's and St Thomas', London, UK.


Otology, Neurotology, and Lateral Skull Base Surgery
Otology, Neurotology, and Lateral Skull Base Surgery
by Oliver Adunka
Edition: Hardcover
Price: £119.50

4.0 out of 5 stars Review from ENT & Audiology News, Jan/Feb 2013, volume 21, number 6, p110., 27 Jun. 2013
The book is well laid out in a portable and easily accessible format. It is divided into seven sections / chapters each with colour coded chapter marks for easy identification. Each chapter is then divided into many succinct sections for effective information delivery. Every section has a list of other `closely related topics' within the book stated near the beginning for the reader to be aware of and refer to. And at the end of every section there are well-referenced suggestions for further `recommended reading'.
The opening chapter provides a very interesting outline of the history and establishment otology / neurotology as a subspeciality in its own right. This is followed by succinct chapters on relevant anatomy and physiology and neurotologic examination, assessment and investigation. The chapters are well laid out, easy to follow and clearly written. The text is appropriately supplemented by colour illustrations and photographs where required.
Chapter four contains disease specific information on diseases of the temporal bone. It is divided systematically into external, middle and inner ear conditions. Once again excellent use is made of colour illustrations and photographs to supplement the text.
This is followed by a chapter dedicated to salient information on surgical therapy / approaches to the temporal bone, from simple procedures such as myringotomy and grommet insertion to more advanced neurotology and skull base procedures. The introductory section of this chapter includes a section on surgical equipment and the rationale behind using specific otologic instruments. There is also a useful section on intraoperative nerve monitoring and on the various graft materials that can be utilised. The subsequent chapter outlines complications and their management.
The final chapter is a brief but very informative temporal bone dissection guide illustrated with cadaveric dissection images. The images in this last chapter are in black and white, which is not in keeping with the excellent colour images and illustrations contained with the rest of the book and this does seem to let the book down somewhat. For any future editions, use colour images for the final chapter would be strongly recommended.
On the whole `Otology, Neurotology, and Lateral Skull Base Surgery: An Illustrated Handbook' provides an excellent, portable, succinct and easily accessible source of information to a complex subspeciality. This book would be useful for trainees in preparation for the FRCS Intercollegiate examinations as well as for those pursuing otology, neurotology and lateral skull base surgery as a subspeciality.

Nazia Munir, MBBCh, DO-HNS, FRCS(ORL-HNS), ENT SpR, Mersey Deanery, UK.


Atlas of Laparoscopic and Robotic Urologic Oncological Surgery
Atlas of Laparoscopic and Robotic Urologic Oncological Surgery
by Reza Ghavamian (Editor)
Edition: Hardcover
Price: £140.00

3.0 out of 5 stars Review from Urology News, Mar/Apr 2013, 5 Mar. 2013
This is a comprehensive review of laparoscopic and robotic approaches to a number of upper and lower tract malignancies. The basic pattern, which is repeated throughout the text, involves a comprehensive description of the general approaches to set-up and positioning (an aspect frequently dealt with badly in similar texts) and is surprisingly informative. Each chapter provides a series of tips and techniques, which appear to get directly to the crux of the surgical approach and act as useful bullet points to the execution of a successful operation. The whole text has a very practical feel to it - a little akin to a well-thumbed manual guide denuded of the unnecessary small talk. In this way the book appears very focused and might explain how such a wide-ranging topic is covered in just 200 odd pages. The text is necessarily a little didactic on occasion but each chapter sets out to provide the reader with at least one tried and tested approach to a particular organ and its approach (whether laparoscopic, robotically-assisted, extraperitoneal or transperitoneal). In this sense the book easily succeeds and is to be recommended. The only slightly disappointing aspect to what is otherwise an undoubtedly excellent addition to the urological library is the quality of the images themselves. On occasion, they lack clarity and are poorly orientated and consequently add little to the text. In many instances they appear to be the result of video capture rather than still photography and so the texts dealing with robotic aspects appear to suffer more than most. As a result, I am not sure that anyone treading an early path in either laparoscopic or robotic surgery would necessarily find some aspects of this book particularly useful. Images associated with the laparoscopic radical cystectomy chapter are particularly poor whilst those dealing with laparoscopic partial nephrectomy are excellent. All said, the book is clearly a useful adjunct to those considering embarking on a laparoscopic or robotically-assisted oncological practice.

Reviewed by: Tim Lane, Consultant Urological Surgeon, Lister Hospital, Stevenage.


Koss's Cytology of the Urinary Tract with Histopathologic Correlations
Koss's Cytology of the Urinary Tract with Histopathologic Correlations
by Leopold G. Koss MD FCRP
Edition: Hardcover
Price: £108.00

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Review from Urology News, Mar/Apr 2013, 5 Mar. 2013
This book represents the concept of urine cytology in a compact, colourful crucible of high quality photomicrographs. It gives an excellent overview on the specific field of urine cytology. `One picture is worth a thousand words' and this succinctly captures the essence of this book with limited text making this book ideal for quick consultation. The first chapter of historical note is very interesting. The second chapter, which is based on laboratory processing of cytological samples, explains the advantages and disadvantages of various cytological methods of investigation in a very detailed and descriptive manner. The chapters on tumours and related conditions of the bladder and lower urinary tract are extensively discussed. Chapter 5 reviews the effect of viral infections in great detail with excellent microphotographs. Human polyomavirus is discussed in great detail, with excellent microphotographs. Also present are some useful descriptions of some potential pitfalls, which may be over interpreted as abnormal. The final chapter discusses the five markers of bladder cancer approved by the US Food and Drug Administration as well as 10 other urine based markers. Immunocytochemical detection of markers in exfoliated urothelial cells is separately reviewed. The sensitivity, specificity and cost of the various markers are also discussed. In summary this book offers a practical approach to sampling techniques and cytological interpretation of urothelial malignancies. I would recommend this book to all laboratories where urine cytology forms an important component of the cytology practice.

Reviewed by: Samita Agarwal, Head of Cellular Pathology & Consultant Histopathologist, QEII Hospital, Welwyn Garden City.


Case Based Echocardiography: Fundamentals and Clinical Practice
Case Based Echocardiography: Fundamentals and Clinical Practice
by Theodore Abraham
Edition: Paperback
Price: £60.00

2.0 out of 5 stars Review from Cardiology News, Feb/Mar 2013, 28 Feb. 2013
Where were the cases? Case Based Echocardiography is presented as an easy read, pocket guide to contemporary echocardiography; something a student or sonographer can stuff in their pockets and take onto the ward to aid diagnosis. It isn't! The problems with this book start with its title. To the casual observer, the label case based, would imply a structure of learning based on individual cases, from which important lessons can be learnt, or principles illustrated. But this book makes little, if any, reference to clinical cases, but is rather a collection of lecture notes around the echocardiography syllabus. Viewed as such it has the strengths and weaknesses of a set of lectures, so some are excellent, some less so. There is a variety of styles which fall into two camps, the footnote text, which is good when brief but less so when highly detailed (especially for those coming to terms with reading glasses) and conventional lecture notes, which are generally easier to follow. In some sections PowerPoint slides seem simply of have been presented as diagrams. Starting with those parts of the book that really worked, the chapter on diastolic assessment in heart failure with preserved ejection fraction is very good. It tackles complex physiology with some brevity, assessment of diastolic function and also addresses the difficult cases that don't obey the rules. Similarly the chapter on right heart function gives a very comprehensive account of the subject. Less successful are chapters where a detailed explanation of theory is required. For example the sections dealing with tissue Doppler, strain and strain rate, although comprehensive, make for difficult comprehension. Some of the tissue Doppler traces are less than best examples which is a surprise. On the other hand the chapter on contrast opts for brevity, which it achieves, but only at the expense of details around the principles of microbubble action and how this influences the choices of machine settings. Myocardial contrast echo is dropped in at the end, without previous explanation which it most certainly requires. Adult congenital heart disease, a specialist area, but not more so than transoesophageal echo, is dealt with in a brief section on atrial septal defects and then a chapter on percutaneous closure. While this may reflect the interests of the authors, it could not be described as a systematic approach to the subject. Most controversial are the chapters on the use of echo in the selection for and optimisation of resynchronisation devices. Controversial firstly because it is far from accepted that there is any role for echo in resynchronisation selection and optimisation. Speaking as someone who believes firmly that there is, the chapter on selection lays down the principles and highlights the problems raised by a myriad of different methodologies, but no international or randomised controlled trial consensus on the evidence. Optimisation is more disputed still. This chapter lays down a structure for optimisation, but fails to acknowledge that is is one of many protocols, all of which are underpinned by some, albeit weak evidence. In this chapter fact and opinion are over merged. So how to summarise this book? Patchy best describes it; patchy in style and patchy in content. So who would buy it. The target audience of sonographers and students who might like to keep it in their pockets or lockers, will probably look elsewhere. It would however find a home in the library of the larger echo department to be picked up when a brief text is required to address a particular case-based echo problem.

Reviewer: Guy Lloyd, Consultant Cardiologist, East Sussex NHS Trust.


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