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Lapsang Souchong Tea Bags, Les Jardins de Gaia,  Fairtrade Organic,  20 Tea Bags, Fully Biodegradable Packaging
Lapsang Souchong Tea Bags, Les Jardins de Gaia, Fairtrade Organic, 20 Tea Bags, Fully Biodegradable Packaging
Offered by Tea & Coffee Emporium
Price: £4.99

5.0 out of 5 stars and great to find a lapsang souchong that's Fairtrade and organic, 3 May 2017
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
Lovely smoky tea, and great to find a lapsang souchong that's Fairtrade and organic.


No Title Available

2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Also surprised by the first two reviews, 2 Jan. 2017
Having tried three out of four bars -- okay, so these are basically minced meat (about 60%) plus egg white protein, nuts/seeds and dried fruit and spices, baked. So in terms of texture, it's the same as a meatball or burger. If the thought of eating that cold puts you off, or you were looking for something more jerky-like, this is not going to work for you. On the other hand, if you're fine with that, it's fine!

Taste-wise, the spices don't overpower the meat, which tastes really good quality (I'd probably be happy with something spicier, but this is good too). In terms of nutrition -- if you lean towards paleo, primal or low-carb, I haven't seen a better "real food" bar. I've already ordered myself some more of the Thai turkey. This is good stuff, and it's cool to see something like this being produced in the UK (rather than having to be imported from the US).


Full of Myself
Full of Myself
by Johnny Dawes
Edition: Hardcover
Price: £25.00

11 of 12 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Johnny Dawes In His Own Write, 3 Dec. 2011
This review is from: Full of Myself (Hardcover)
If you've got any interest in British rock climbing (or climbing full stop), then you know -- or should know -- who Johnny Dawes is.

Dawes (The Dawes, the Stone Monkey, the Cosmic Rascal ...) is one of the great climbers of the 20th century. In the 80s, he pushed the grades with routes like Gaia, Indian Face, Braille Trail and the Quarryman that were not only harder than anything anyone else was climbing, they were bolder, stranger, more visionary. While his peers were getting into sport climbing, regimented training and athleticism, Dawes seemed to be imagining new ways of moving on rock, finding ways to stand on nothingness or use dynamism to flow through a series of inadequate holds.

It's no surprise that this is anything but a standard climbing autobiography, and it shouldn't be: instead, it feels like a download direct from Johnny's brain, raw and unfiltered, a glimpse into what it feels like to have the kind of mind that could envision those routes. It skips over what a ghostwriter would have added, the bland and factual over-elaboration of who and what and where, in favour of wonky lyricism and move-by-move descriptions of climbs, the textures and subtleties of holds and moves recalled in microscopic and impassioned detail. More than any other book I've read, it communicates the way in which climbing can transcend "sport" to become a deep engagement of the heart and the world.

Oh, and there's a very important existential encounter with a bee.

Baffling, brilliant, heart-breaking, slyly hilarious when you least expect it; it will make you believe that if you could understand all of it, you could climb a good five grades harder. Essential reading.


Overcoming Relationship Problems: A Books on Prescription Title: A Self-Help Guide Using Cognitive Behavioral Techniques (Overcoming Books)
Overcoming Relationship Problems: A Books on Prescription Title: A Self-Help Guide Using Cognitive Behavioral Techniques (Overcoming Books)
by Michael Crowe
Edition: Paperback
Price: £10.99

18 of 22 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Warning: do not attempt to treat domestic violence with CBT, 12 Nov. 2011
Disclaimer: I haven't read this book. But I did use the "Search Inside" function to browse through it, and that was how I found and read the section on domestic violence.

According to Crowe, unless a man is using domestic violence in a "sadistic" way, "it is always worth thinking of the violence as an accidental outcome of the struggle between the two partners, and therefore trying to tackle it by helping the couple to live together more peacefully and safely."

He goes on to blame violence on women's verbal skills and "having the last word," which "humiliates" men, and happily describes a case history where cognitive-behavioural therapy allegedly fixed a relationship after the man had sent the woman to the A&E twice with suspected fractures.

Later in the book, he explains that violence should be discussed as "our fights" rather than "your aggression".

This is the sort of discredited advice that leads to people staying with violent partners and trying to "fix" them, blaming themselves for somehow causing the violence. And in some cases, it leads to them ending up dead.


The Rough Guide to Climate Change (Rough Guides Reference Titles)
The Rough Guide to Climate Change (Rough Guides Reference Titles)
by Robert Henson
Edition: Paperback

9 of 11 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Essential reading, 15 Dec. 2006
This is a concise, readable, well-substantiated account of both the state of current climate change science and the political conflict surrounding it. We all need to be reading this.


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