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Mavic Chen (London)

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Official Badge Collector's Guide: From the 1890's to the 1980's
Official Badge Collector's Guide: From the 1890's to the 1980's
by Frank R. Setchfield
Edition: Hardcover

4.0 out of 5 stars The One, 19 July 2017
This is (so far), despite a number of gaping holes,particularly where sets are involved, this remains the definitive guide to badges for the collector, though there isn't exactly a lot of choice. I've had this since the day of release and it's still a great read and reference source, though inevitably showing its age (1986). Actually, it's high time a new edition was published, so buyers be aware of its limitations and you'll still enjoy a well informed and entertaining read (and a lot of well-annotated badge pictures.


Dominic Sandbrook Collection, Never Had it so Good and White Heat - Sealed Set of 2 Books
Dominic Sandbrook Collection, Never Had it so Good and White Heat - Sealed Set of 2 Books
by Dominic Sandbrook
Edition: Paperback

5.0 out of 5 stars Never Had It So Entertaining, 19 July 2017
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Two excellent books in a first rate series of four. I really couldn't recommend these more highly to anyone interested in the history of Britain since 1950.We really haven't had it so good. Sandbrook's research is first-rate and his writing style very engaging -yet he never short-changes us on the intellectual front. Best part of this paring is that, when you've finished them you can then go on to his equally brilliant account of the 1970s. Other social historians take note, this series has set the bar high.


The Graphic Art of the Enamel Badge
The Graphic Art of the Enamel Badge
by Ken Sequin
Edition: Paperback

5.0 out of 5 stars Feast for the Eyes, 19 July 2017
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A very entertaining book for those interested in the enamel badge though having the information at the end of the book in a form of footnotes is highly annoying. They're also superficial, with the bare minimum of information, but the items themselves are wonderful. An absolute must for any collector or anyone interested in the art of the enamel badge.


Badges
Badges
by Philip Attwood
Edition: Paperback

5.0 out of 5 stars Pinned It, 19 July 2017
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This review is from: Badges (Paperback)
This is a remarkably big thing in a small package. There's precious few resources for badge collectors and anyone into the hobby who hasn't got this will love it. Frank Setchfield's 'Badge Collectors Guide' remains the definitive tome in a very small field but this is well worth having. My only criticism is that it could probably have been three times this size -Oh for a volume two.


The Good Life - Complete Boxed Set [DVD]
The Good Life - Complete Boxed Set [DVD]
Dvd ~ Richard Briers
Offered by Quality Media Supplies Ltd.
Price: £34.44

5.0 out of 5 stars Good then - Good Now, 19 July 2017
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Is there anyone who hasn't seen this series many times yet it never fails to charm. Puts most contemporary comedy series to shame.


Space: 1999 - The Complete Second Series [DVD]
Space: 1999 - The Complete Second Series [DVD]
Dvd ~ Martin Landau
Offered by NextDayEntertainment
Price: £28.24

1 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A Matter of Balance, 19 July 2017
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Yes, it's ridiculous as ever, but, while not a patch on UFO I found it it great fun if taken on its own, rather absurd terms. I don't do synopses, there are plenty of places that do and, by now, I should think most purchasers have a fair idea of what's going on in the series, but the FX, direction and camera-work are all up to scratch. My only criticisms lie with the packaging. The Series One box set is immaculate, with TWO booklets an easy to navigate menu and a chapter-skip function that when hit as the start credits begin, jumps the viewer past them to the beginning of the episode. This box set comes with no booklets and a root menu that has thoughtfully put white lettering on a white background. Unlike the absolutely brilliant remastering and packaging of Season One you do get the impression this one was far more 'bashed out'. Still, at least it's relatively cheap.


British Low Culture: From Safari Suits to Sexploitation
British Low Culture: From Safari Suits to Sexploitation
by Leon Hunt
Edition: Paperback
Price: £22.99

4.0 out of 5 stars Confessions of a Seventies Kitsch Lover, 19 July 2017
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AN enjoyable read for what is basically an academic book, not least given how academia has a knack of sucking the life out of even the most promising subjects. While Mr Hunt is well-informed one comes away from this wishing he'd cast the net a little wider and perhaps gone deeper into the rabbit hole that is seventies popular culture. I get the impression he's erudite on a few texts he's studied and restricts himself to that. However, while this may be just a case of the book showing its age, (1998) I can't accept that as the answer. For example, in the film section he deals with the usual suspects -the 'Adventures' and 'Confessions' series,the Mary Millington rip-offathons, ho only mentions in passing the extraordinary sci-fi/sex/Bond film 'Zeta One', yet fails to go into any detail. While no-one in their right mind would nominate it for an Oscar it is a startling crossover-cum-transitional piece of British cinema (released in 1970) itself based on a short-lived pseudo-porn magazine. For the uninitiated, plot-wise we are asked to accept Charles Hawtry as and an intergalactic villain whose name is an anagram of Vagina. Other points of interest being the elevator's remarkable resemblance to Marvin from 'Hitchhiker' Guide' and the visual delights of the scantily-clad Hammer scream queens, Yutte Stensgaard and Valerie Leon. And so on: while two or three examples can and are well used to argue a few points, personally I would rather have many more examples discussed. So, ultimately, I found this in equal parts enjoyable and frustrating, not least because there are so few works out there (such as the excellent 'Keeping the British end Up' by Simon Sheridan) covering the British low culture of the seventies. As something of a connoisseur, believe me the surface has only just been scraped and a far more thorough book is just aching to be written. Hmmm.....


State of Emergency: The Way We Were: Britain, 1970-1974
State of Emergency: The Way We Were: Britain, 1970-1974
by Dominic Sandbrook
Edition: Paperback
Price: £13.78

0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Didn't he do well!, 19 July 2017
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A great book, thoroughly readable yet without for one moment compromising academic standards.I'd recommend this to anyone who was there or anyone wanting to know what really went on in the first half of the seventies. The previous pair on the fifties, and sixties and the book covering the latter half of the seventies are just as good. Now Mr Sandbrook -how about starting on the eighties?


Boys Are Stupid Official 2014 Calendar
Boys Are Stupid Official 2014 Calendar
by Pyramid International
Edition: Calendar
Price: £9.99

1.0 out of 5 stars Comedic Inversion Fail, 19 July 2017
These images -the badges, mugs etc as well as the calendar- are not just unfunny and offensive, if someone published similar about women or ethnic minorities it would have been banned. Why is this still on sale?


Doctor Who - The Power of the Daleks [DVD] [2016]
Doctor Who - The Power of the Daleks [DVD] [2016]
Dvd ~ Patrick Troughton
Price: £10.99

14 of 22 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Exterminate! Exterminate! Exterminate!, 26 Jan. 2017
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The last thing I was expecting was to post a negative review of possibly my favourite Dr Who story and, frankly, it gives me no pleasure to do so -though that probably won't cut any ice with the army of haters who crawl out of the woodwork whenever anyone -even a fellow fan- dares criticise the show. For other prospective purchasers however, I have to concur with some other reviewers that the standard of animation is abysmal and it's a tragedy such a great story has been released in this shoddy form. I wasn't expecting Pixar or Disney standards but the animation is generally crude and amateurish in the extreme and, yes, it really does come across like a noir version of Captain Pugwash -only less entertaining than that sounds: in many ways the Loose Canon version is a lot less visually irritating. All the humanoid characters are badly animated but Troughton in particular looks like a Neanderthal most of the time, while the resemblance of Ben to Michael Craze is perhaps 'occasional'. The Dalek-only sequences come out of all this reasonably well, though overall the visual standards pale in comparison to some fan animations on You-Tube. If this is the best they can do, how Charles Norton's team got the gig is beyond me. I have heard numerous sob-stories regarding time as well as budget constraints, but why should they be imposed -having waited almost fifty years for the BEEB to get off their collective arses about this story, I for one would have happily waited another year or so to have it animated properly and with a bit of respect. My overall impression was one of no care or love being put into this production at all and actually, we'd probably all have been better off if the BBC had funded some of the extremely capable fan animators instead. And, though it pains to say it -not to have this particular artifact at all. Then we may have got something to treasure, not a cheapskate travesty. Having just rubbished the visuals the same most certainly cannot be said of Mark Ayres excellent restoration work on the soundtrack, it deserves so much better than it gets here. Maybe in the future someone will do this story justice, as I'm informed that because of the way international sales went POTD is just about the least likely story to be recovered.
The belated announcement of a colour version on Blu-ray merely adds insult to injury. One final point. This project might only have come out of BBC Worldwide's budget but, considering the serial's absence is entirely down to BBC mismanagement it wouldn't have come amiss for them to put a little more in the kitty -especially given what a big revenue-raiser Who remains. So, one stars only -and that's for the extras, which are actually pretty good -but neither I or any other purchaser bought this for the extras and, like at least one other reviewer on here, my copy will be straight off to the charity shops. The saddest thing about this whole shoddy farrago is that I can't be the only one who will be far less eager to check out the next release.
Comment Comments (4) | Permalink | Most recent comment: Aug 13, 2017 10:41 AM BST


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