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Reviews Written by
Mr. A. D. Bickerstaffe (Loughborough, UK)
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Zephyr
Zephyr
Offered by Fulfillment Express
Price: £16.03

1.0 out of 5 stars Poor, 1 Jun. 2016
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This review is from: Zephyr (Audio CD)
Very disappointed. Anonymous, meanderings basically. Not at all up to the standards of Basement Jaxx of yore (Rooty, Kish Kash etc.). Only Sunrising has a good enough sound to be worth having.


Biona Organic Pure Tart Cherry Juice 1 Litre (Pack of 3)
Biona Organic Pure Tart Cherry Juice 1 Litre (Pack of 3)
Price: £14.07

4.0 out of 5 stars Soft Drink for Adults, 1 Jun. 2016
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A little more sour than the canned stuff I had in Turkey but quite a nice adult soft drink. Not quite as nice as red wine, but if you wanted to make it alcoholic you could stir in a bit of damson gin. It is supposed to aid sleep too.


Panhandle Rambler
Panhandle Rambler
Price: £12.49

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Pleasant Enough, 1 Jun. 2016
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This review is from: Panhandle Rambler (Audio CD)
A good voice and nice sound overall. The songs fail to quite hit the mark for me, but they're not far off.


Scars
Scars
Offered by mrtopseller
Price: £2.00

3.0 out of 5 stars Salvaged by Distractions, 5 May 2016
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This review is from: Scars (Audio CD)
I was going to give it 2 Stars but I have relented and given it 3. The chief reason is Distractions, a fabulous piece of sonorous bass, rippling keyboards, and glockenspiel sounds which mesmerise as they weave and mesh. As such it is one of the few moments of originality on an album lacking much in the way of tunes with real impact, and too frequently embellished with vocoder vocals, or standard soul-ish black singing.
Raindrops, however, is a stirring song; Saga is buoyant in a 2 Tone-stylee; We March On is good fun and gets on its good foot; but other good moments are thinly scattered. Scars sounds like a Russian choir, and Feelings Gone is not unpleasant.
This has to be compared with Kish Kash, which is almost perfect and earns 5 stars.


Post Pop Depression
Post Pop Depression
Price: £9.24

3.0 out of 5 stars Decent Effort, 25 April 2016
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This review is from: Post Pop Depression (Audio CD)
Yeah, not bad. Generally a good sound, but lacking any great subtlety. The keyboard on the opener, Break Into Your Heart, is an exception. Words quite interesting.


Music Of The Spheres
Music Of The Spheres
Offered by best_value_entertainment
Price: £3.44

5.0 out of 5 stars Stardust, 19 Mar. 2016
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This review is from: Music Of The Spheres (Audio CD)
Great album. Some interesting lyrics matched by lovely tunes. FEAR, Stardust, Bubbles, and Forever and a Day are highlights in a great collection


My Way
My Way
Offered by A ENTERTAINMENT
Price: £4.22

2.0 out of 5 stars SAME ALL OVER, 19 Mar. 2016
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This review is from: My Way (Audio CD)
Unfortunately I have to say that this largely sounds the same, with synths pumping out one heavy sequence after another. Skellify is good, as is Vanity Kills, and Marathon Man is the best of the monolithic pumpers - otherwise best left. Golden Greats and Music of the Spheres are, however, excellent. Get them instead.


The Unknown Tutankhamun (Bloomsbury Egyptology)
The Unknown Tutankhamun (Bloomsbury Egyptology)
by Marianne Eaton-Krauss
Edition: Paperback
Price: £19.99

10 of 10 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Tut - Beyond the Treasure, 11 Jan. 2016
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On page 3 Marianne refers to an illustration in Zahi Hawass’ seventh book on Tutankhamun, which prompts the question: Does the world need another book on the subject? In fact, the select bibliography in this book makes virtually no reference to the more popular books on Tutankhamun – based largely around sumptuous colour photographs of objects from the tomb – and there is indeed a need, as she says, for a review of the evidence on the life and reign of Tutankhaten/amun with a ‘readable text…maintaining standards of scholarship.’ The prospect of this was sufficient to lead me to pre-order the book, so that I was actually reading it on the day of release.

As Marianne points out in the introduction, quite a lot was known about Tutankhamun before the discovery of his tomb, and (as Carter and Mace predicted), the finds made there did little to expand our knowledge. In fact most of the advances in understanding have been made by detailed study of ‘long-known but neglected evidence’, published in academic journals, often in French or German. The result is that a lot of what we think we know is actually out-of-date and based on misconceptions, and there can be said to be a real need for a book that reviews the evidence of Tutankhamun’s monuments in the light of recent scholarship, though Aidan Dodson’s, Amarna Sunset covers much of the same ground.

The book follows a broadly chronological approach, starting with questions of Tutankhaten’s parentage, and ending with Tutankhamun’s death and burial. In the process we learn that Akhenaten did not attack the temples of most deities throughout Egypt; that the restoration of Amun was under way before Tutankhamun came to the throne; and that his restoration of scenes is characterised by a high-quality low relief. We are reminded that many of his statues are based on models from the late Middle Kingdom, that Amarna royals can be recognised by their feet, and that gods don’t wear sandals. Tutankhamun is shown – hidden beneath the usurpations of Horemheb – to have been a great restorer, a man of many monuments, the great leader back to orthodoxy.

It is no criticism to say that the book is not, of course, light reading, but more effort could have been made to present ideas logically. Thus, for instance, many instances of Horemheb’s usurpation of Tutankhamun’s cartouches are mentioned before the way in which this was done is discussed. Much of the attribution of monuments to Tutankhamun comes down to facial recognition and so it would have been useful to have seen features that were indisputably Horemheb (or Ay) for comparison. The significance of the two foetuses from KV62 and the fact that Tutankhamun’s mummy was missing its heart are rather passed over, and more could have been said about the location of the missing mortuary temple.

Overall, though, this is a useful discussion of the evidence relating to a pivotal figure in the history of ancient Egypt.


Tutu (Deluxe)
Tutu (Deluxe)
Price: £8.81

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Good Groove, 30 Oct. 2015
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This review is from: Tutu (Deluxe) (Audio CD)
A thing of its time awash with 80s synths but still kicks impressively. The opening tracks are evocative and atmospheric, and there is punchy funk groove toward the end, culminating in Full Nelson. The live album is excellent too, especially a transcendent Portia. This sits nicely alongside the more extreme Bitches Brew.


Carrie & Lowell
Carrie & Lowell
Price: £7.99

4.0 out of 5 stars Well Worth Having, 30 Oct. 2015
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This review is from: Carrie & Lowell (Audio CD)
Pretty acoustic-picking with evocative sound washes, offset by somewhat grim lyrics inspired by the death of his mother. A bit samey, but there is only one track I find a bit wearisome, and there are many beautiful highlights such as Should Have Known Better, Fourth of July, No Shade in the Shadow of the Cross. One of the best new albums for a while.


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