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E. Williams "etw69" (London, England)
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Circle of Eight: Creating Magic for Your Place on Earth
Circle of Eight: Creating Magic for Your Place on Earth
Price: £14.03

5.0 out of 5 stars Excellent, 6 Aug. 2016
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This book really helped me to work out my own, coherent Wheel of the Year, tied to my local land. Highly recommended.


The Essential Guide to Psychic Self Defence
The Essential Guide to Psychic Self Defence
by Tylluan Penry
Edition: Paperback

5.0 out of 5 stars Should become the new standard text on psychic self-defence, 25 Jun. 2016
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This is an excellent guide to psychic self-defence, clear enough for beginners and comprehensive enough that more advanced practitioners will also learn something. In my view it should replace Dion Fortune's Psychic Self-Defence as the standard recommendation for beginners. Dion Fortune's work will always be of historical value, but Tylluan Penry's book covers the same ground and more, is more clearly written and organised, and deals with new phenomena such as psychic attacks via the Internet that post-date Dion Fortune's work. It is also free of some of the more problematic aspects of Dion Fortune's work, such as racial, gender and class stereotyping and a somewhat patronising attitude to folk magick, that while not unusual in her time make me uncomfortable suggesting Dion Fortune's book as the first port of call.


Organic Psyllium Whole Husk 340g
Organic Psyllium Whole Husk 340g
Offered by santa's helpers
Price: £10.49

0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Texture made me gag, 22 Jan. 2016
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I tried this as an alternative to Fybogel, hoping that an unflavoured supplement would be more palatable than the synthetic orange and aspartame used in that product. Couldn't have been more wrong. The texture is coarse and gritty - I couldn't force it down, either with water or mixed into a smoothie. What was left after my experiments went in the bin.


Witches of America
Witches of America
by Alex Mar
Edition: Hardcover
Price: £7.66

8 of 10 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Unethical and unreliable, 26 Oct. 2015
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This review is from: Witches of America (Hardcover)
It is apparent from the first few chapters of this book that Alex Mar knowingly reveals personal information about named individuals without their consent, in circumstances where doing so could be dangerous to their livelihoods and without reasonable justification. As a journalist, Ms Mar knows this is unethical, yet she chooses to do it even though it adds nothing to her story. She also shows an obsession with the physical appearance of her subjects, particularly the women. Since several of the people concerned trusted her enough to allow her to see them naked, this makes for very uncomfortable, involuntarily voyeuristic reading at times.

The title of the book is also likely to mislead, implying a fairly comprehensive account of American witchcraft traditions. In fact, only three groups are treated in any depth, none of them either numerically or thematically representative of the mainstream of American witchcraft (only one of them even uses the term as part of its self-definition). In addition, at least one of the incidents she describes is intrinsically implausible in its everyday aspects, whatever your view of the supernatural elements. It is possible that Mar has been misled by her informant, but even if so, her apparent failure to ask obvious questions about the veracity of the account makes it difficult to trust the rest of her information. There are many better introductions to America's Pagan scene available, the classics being Margot Adler's Drawing Down the Moon and Chas Clifton's Her Hidden Children. Those interested in the British roots of modern Pagan witchcraft should also read Ron Hutton's The Triumph of the Moon.


Calida Women's Leggings Comfort Leggings, White (Weiss 001), UK 20 (Manufacturer size: M = 44/46)
Calida Women's Leggings Comfort Leggings, White (Weiss 001), UK 20 (Manufacturer size: M = 44/46)
Price: £23.65

4.0 out of 5 stars Four Stars, 26 Aug. 2015
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Practical and comfortable, with a nice soft feel. They wash well too.


ECCO Women's Cruise Athletic Sandals
ECCO Women's Cruise Athletic Sandals
Price: £46.30 - £93.39

2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Best sandals I've ever had, 26 Aug. 2015
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I love these sandals and am going to buy several pairs in different colours. They were comfortable from the first time I wore them - I was able to walk long distances, including up and downhill, without getting blisters. I have a wide and high foot, and these fit comfortably (my usual size is 6.5, but as these don't come in half sizes I got a 7). They look nice enough to wear with a dress while also looking practical enough to go with walking gear. Compared to other sandals I've tried, they don't pick up much gravel either!


Pagan Goddesses in the Early Germanic World (Studies in Early Medieval History)
Pagan Goddesses in the Early Germanic World (Studies in Early Medieval History)
by Philip A. Shaw
Edition: Paperback
Price: £19.99

2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Best source out there on Eostre, Hreda, and the Matronae, 30 Mar. 2015
Very careful and thorough scholarship, and very readable for an academic work.

A large part of Shaw's intention in writing it is to challenge a perception that pre-Christian Germanic paganism was homogeneous by examining the claim that Eostre was a pan-Germanic goddess known in Germany as Ostara. He begins with an introduction to the linguistic models and methods he will use. He then gives an overview of some relevant features of Romano-Germanic religion, focusing in particular on votive inscriptions to the Matronae, pointing out that these often have names related to particular localities or kin groups, but that some inscriptions refer to the Matronae of a wider group such as a tribe or group of tribes.

This leads into Shaw's chapter on Eostre. He outlines how the existence of a goddess Ostara was extrapolated from Bede's remarks and the form of the word for Easter in certain Germanic languages, and notes that some scholars have reacted against this extrapolation by doubting that Eostre existed at all. Others however, have suggested that Eostre could be etymologically related to the Austriahenae, a group of Matronae to whom a large number of inscriptions have been found near Morken-Harff in Germany. Based on a linguistic and etymological analysis, Shaw rejects the suggestion that Eostre's name relates to a word related to "dawn" or "spring". Rather, he concludes that while Austriahenae and Eostre are not the same entity(ies), they are probably the result of the same naming convention; both effectively refer to the matron(s) of a group that identified themselves as "eastern", probably geographically and/or in relation to neighbouring groups. Thus, Eostre may well have been the matron of a local Kentish group, and this would be consistent with the fact that dialects outside Kent appear to have had a different name for this month. He also notes that copies of Bede's writings seem to have been sent at a very early stage to the diocese of Mainz, which is in the part of Germany where we find the earliest occurrences of a word related to our "Easter" . Thus, it is possible that Bede himself, or other Anglo-Saxon missionary activities around Mainz, are responsible for the use of related words for Easter there.

A chapter on Hreda follows, adopting a similar approach, but here Shaw finds the evidence much less clear. He does not rule out the possibility that her name is related to a word meaning "quick", but he also notes that this word is itself a fairly common element in human names of the period. This means we cannot conclude that Hreda was some sort of "goddess of speed"; she may simply have been the matron of a kin group whose name used this element. Alternatively, there is some evidence that the name may be related to an ethnic designation referring to Goths or a Gothic sub-group. Against the background of the known naming conventions, therefore, both etymologies appear to point to a group matron rather than to a functional goddess.


Bluebeard: The Autobiography of Rabo Karabekian (1916-1988)
Bluebeard: The Autobiography of Rabo Karabekian (1916-1988)
Price: £6.97

4.0 out of 5 stars Interesting take on an old fairy tale, 16 Jan. 2013
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Vonnegut gives the fairy tale of Bluebeard a twentieth-century twist by making Bluebeard an artist who has survived World War II and, in its aftermath, become an abstract expressionist as well as something of a recluse. Through his musings, Vonnegut explores the themes of gender politics and the existentialist crisis of meaning. As a Vonnegut fan, I thought this didn't quite measure up to his "big idea" novels such as Slaughterhouse Five and Timequake, but as someone with an interest in modern art, I enjoyed it and found myself quite invested in the outcome (which, however, I will not spoil for other readers!)


Deadeye Dick
Deadeye Dick
Price: £6.34

3.0 out of 5 stars Not as original as some of Vonnegut's other work, 16 Jan. 2013
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This review is from: Deadeye Dick (Kindle Edition)
Quite an enjoyable read, with some dramatic tension created by Vonnegut's techniques of presenting the plot slightly out of chronological sequence and feeding the reader just enough information to raise more questions about what has happened or is going to happen. Overall, though, it lacks the originality of Timequake, Slaughterhouse Five or Mother Night by the same author, and the obvious Cold War influence makes it feel quite dated now.


Welcome to the Monkey House
Welcome to the Monkey House
Price: £6.34

3.0 out of 5 stars Bitty, 16 Jan. 2013
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Usually I like Vonnegut's writing, but I found these short stories rather unsatisfying, almost as if they were novel ideas that he couldn't be bothered developing fully. Some of them also seem very dated now, e.g. "Welcome to the Monkey House" itself - using a ban on procreation as the basis of a dystopia just doesn't feel original enough any more, and the use of kidnapping and rape as part of the supposed resolution now comes across as deeply creepy.


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