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Per Kistler

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Lady Tasting Tea
Lady Tasting Tea
by David Salsburg
Edition: Paperback
Price: £18.99

10 of 12 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Bringing statstics to live, 3 Nov. 2003
This review is from: Lady Tasting Tea (Paperback)
David Salsburg has an amazing knowledge of the historic
developement of statistics during the last century. He presents
the lifes of inumerable contributors to the field and the
unfolding of probabilistic and statistical ideas in an intimate
way. The reader might feel as if he/she were present whenever
anything relevant in statistics had happend. Many of the life
stories were touching and I had the feeling of reading an
epic novel. But the many math terms, explained easily (no formulas,
due to the authors wife), or the tragical historic facts of wars
and depressions or the low probability of a person
understanding probability always remaind one of the the funny
reality mixup of mathematics and the physical world.


A Mathematician's Survival Guide: Graduate School and Early Career Development (amsns AMS non-series title)
A Mathematician's Survival Guide: Graduate School and Early Career Development (amsns AMS non-series title)
by Steven G. Krantz
Edition: Paperback
Price: £28.50

0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Detailed information for an American math grad. student, 1 Nov. 2003
A book for the elite among the math students in the USA.
Questions like: How to choose a graduate school, how to apply,
how to prepare, how to finance studies, what duties are to be
expected, what mathematics has to be learned for the the
qualifying exam and others ad infinitum, are answerd in this
book in a detailed and lively way, competently and sometimes
with a little cynism. If the reader, like myself, does not
belong to the intended audience, he/she my feel embarassed about
the elitist attitude of the author. Over all, the book is good,
because it fullfills it's promise and is easy to read.


God's Equation: Einstein, Relativity, and the Expanding Universe
God's Equation: Einstein, Relativity, and the Expanding Universe
by Amir D Aczel PhD
Edition: Paperback

4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Einsteins struggle for the final equation, 29 Mar. 2003
Inspired by the fact that the universe is ever expanding,
Aczel wrote the history from Einstein to the present
of the thoughts around Einsteins cosmic constant. The main
part deals with Einsteins struggles with his main equation
and the discovery of the first proof for general relativity,
the bending of star light around the sun. This history part
is presented in kind of zooming in at those times and people,
so that one temporarely becomes part of the times of the
process of verificaton and recognition of general relativity.
From the statements about the cosmic constant the author
then leads the reader into modern times, but this time rather
zoomed out, mentioning many people an theories.
It's all gripping to read, but one does not get answers about
the phenomena which introduced the book, namely, how the
universe could possibly accelerate it's expansion.


The Man Who Loved Only Numbers: Story of Paul Erdos and the Search for Mathematical Truth
The Man Who Loved Only Numbers: Story of Paul Erdos and the Search for Mathematical Truth
by Paul Hoffman
Edition: Paperback
Price: £12.08

9 of 11 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The Master Mathematician, 29 Mar. 2003
268 pages plus 16 photo pages, exciting to read, revealing
the life and personality of Paul Erdos, a great and very
excentric number theorist of the 20-th century. The author
knew Erdos personally and speaks out quite openly, nearly
too openly, about private details of Erdos' life. Since
Erdos was only and always concerned with mathematics it is a
special achievement of the author to create such a
fascinating book. The excentricities of Erdos, on the other
hand, lead to many funny situations, which the author seems
to have collected from many of Erdos remaining friends and
which stories made it easier to bring the mathematicians bio
to life.
Some simple math pops up here and there to give the reader an
idea about the topics, Erdos was concerned with.
Paus Erdos was the master of the matematicians and it is very
inspiring to meet him in this book.


The Elegant Universe: Superstrings, Hidden Dimensions and the Quest for the Ultimate Theory
The Elegant Universe: Superstrings, Hidden Dimensions and the Quest for the Ultimate Theory
by Brian Greene
Edition: Paperback
Price: £11.38

4 of 5 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Great presentation of the string-theory, 15 Mar. 2003
Written by a professor of physics and mathematics for the
public, the book first introduces into the theory of
relativiy and quantum physics and proceedes into
string-theory to show what it is and how it could unite the
foregoing two theories. Each chapter introduces fascinating
new material, including such odities as that a universe with
a radius R is physically equal to a universe with a radius
of 1/R. To make things comprehensible the author uses every
day examples and simple, lower dimensional graphics
appropriately and frequently. The reader needs no
mathematics, because it all hides in the endnotes. Greene is
himself a leading string scientist and in two chapters
recounts personal stories of how he was involved in new
discoveries.


Fermat's Last Theorem: The Story Of A Riddle That Confounded The World's Greatest Minds For 358 Years
Fermat's Last Theorem: The Story Of A Riddle That Confounded The World's Greatest Minds For 358 Years
by Simon Singh
Edition: Paperback
Price: £6.99

6 of 7 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars From Pythagoras to Wiles, non stop, 25 Feb. 2003
Wiles quest for solving Fermat's riddle interwoven with the
history of the theory of numbers, lucidely written and not
easy to be put aside before having finishing it.
The story navigates between biographical, historical and
mathematical topics in a fluid and intriguing fashion.
One learns about the school of the Pythagoraens, with details
like the drowning of the pupil, who tried to prove rational
numbers, up to the Japanese scholars Taniyama and Shimura,
again with insights into math and personal tragedy.
The further one gets in the book, the more Andrew Wiles
gets the focus and finally one hopes as much as Wiles
himself, that he might solve the quest....


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