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Anne Thomas (London United Kingdom)

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Apple iPod nano 16GB  7th Generation - Slate  (Latest Model - Launched Sept 2012)
Apple iPod nano 16GB 7th Generation - Slate (Latest Model - Launched Sept 2012)
Offered by Mobile_Deals

1.0 out of 5 stars and truly annoying new OS X version, 17 April 2015
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
It's not what I expect of Apple. It was advertised as working with my existing operating system – what arrived did NOT, so had to invest in a different, and truly annoying new OS X version. As a product it's not a patch on the now discontinued iPod Classic (pathetic capacity) – and it doesn't fit on a standard Apple iPod dock. Wish I hadn't bothered.


Dambusters: A Landmark Oral History
Dambusters: A Landmark Oral History
by Max Arthur
Edition: Hardcover

65 of 66 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The Dambuster raid comes alive, 11 Nov. 2008
There are many histories written about the Dams raid where you can glean the clinical facts - and there was the film ... but there's nothing like oral history to engage the imagination and bring you close to the people who were there. The Dambusters, far from being 'gung-ho' come over as men of enormous skill, courage and resourcefulness, with a strong camaraderie among the crews. Their own words ring true - some readily admit that Gibson wasn't universally popular - but none doubted his resolve and courage. The crews trained to the increasingly exacting demands by the designer of the new bomb - they recall hair-raising flying at just 60 feet, honing their bombing accuracy - and their accounts build the tension until, on the day of the raid, they learn their night's target and recall their emotions. The accounts of the flight out and the bomb runs on the dams are riveting as some aircraft and crews go down in flames - and as an added bonus, there are detailed recollections from Germans who found themselves under the breaking dams. It's a brilliant read and a great tribute to all involved in the raid, from Barnes Wallis and his work to develop the bomb, to Gibson and all his crews and ground crews of 617 Squadron. Can't recommend it enough.
Comment Comment (1) | Permalink | Most recent comment: Nov 15, 2008 7:30 PM GMT


Faces of World War One: The Tragedy of the Great War in Words and Pictures
Faces of World War One: The Tragedy of the Great War in Words and Pictures
by Max Arthur
Edition: Hardcover

65 of 67 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Unforgettable faces, 30 Oct. 2007
There have been other books of photos of World War 1, and one might expect to see the same old images - but this is a collection of many unfamiliar, previously unseen photos - of subjects ranging from the Western Front, Gallipoli, the home front, and behind the lines - and both before, during and after the war.
The large format lends itself to the often panoramic images - and also allows you to see in detail extraordinary and haunting portraits - the 'faces' after which the book is named. It's a collection to please the expert and the interested browser alike - a WWI buff will appreciate the precisely captioned battle scenes - but any reader will feel the impact of the personal quotations which accompany many images - they add an extraordinary dimension to one's understanding of life and conditions in the trenches. It's an immensely moving photo-record, but my heart was particularly wrenched by the three Australian brothers who all died in one two-day attack, the home images of the average, working-class man who went to fight for king and country... not the Eton toffs, but the desperately poor. The images depict a world of contrasts, both in Britain and in Germany - but when it came down to it, all the men at the front were in the same boat, and returned after the conflict to their bleak lives with their terrible disfigurements, mental scars and the memory of lost comrades.


Lost Voices of the Edwardians: 1901-1910 in Their Own Words
Lost Voices of the Edwardians: 1901-1910 in Their Own Words
by Max Arthur
Edition: Hardcover

18 of 20 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Incredible portrait of an era, 21 April 2006
I wasn't sure what to expect from an oral history book sourced, as this had to be, from archive material - but I was not disappointed. From the first page you get an extraordinary insight into an era so different from today that only the simple honesty of the reminiscences convinces you that life can have once been like that in the lifetime of our grandparents and great grandparents. It's an all-round portrait of the time - swingeing poverty, illness and infant deaths, life in the criminal and underworld classes, politics and the suffragettes, travel, entertainment - and the yawning chasm between the lives of the well-off upper class and the rest of the country. It's an intensely vivid and moving portrayal of a neglected era of our history. If you like oral history, this is a 'must-read' - a real treat.


Last Post: The Final Word From Our First World War Soldiers
Last Post: The Final Word From Our First World War Soldiers
by Max Arthur
Edition: Hardcover

13 of 15 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Last Post - a worthy tribute, 26 Nov. 2005
When I read Last Post I wasn't looking for 'history' - but for something more personal and emotional - and I was not disappointed. It gives a wonderful insight into the lives of these extraordinary survivors, and a real sense of the enduring loss they still feel for their friends who didn't return from the war. Their memories, still vivid, opened up an era before our own familiar times - these men have experienced so much and tell of a war of a kind we today find hard to imagine. I know one of the men died recently, age 109 - and it gives even greater poignancy to his account in the book.
In addition, the photos of the veterans, then and now, are brilliant. Last Post was a very moving read, and has given me a lot to think about


Forgotten Voices of the Second World War: A new history of world war two in the words of the men and women who were there
Forgotten Voices of the Second World War: A new history of world war two in the words of the men and women who were there
by Max Arthur
Edition: Hardcover

36 of 37 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Unforgettable Voices!, 3 Nov. 2004
Right from the beginning - the outbreak of war - the individuals' accounts give an immensely moving insight into such widely different areas of the conflict - and portray such a range of experience, from the home front to the front line. The first-hand reminiscences bring the events of history to life - so vividly. I read the accounts from every year and every campaign with an increasing realisation of just how the war took its toll. The reminiscences of a former prisoner of the Japanese who returned to his family home stunned me. He went to his own room, having never been completely on his own for four years, and was suddenly alone with his thoughts - what had it all been about? It was a really powerful and moving read - whether you're a war-reader or not.


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