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Steve Benner "Stonegnome" (Lancaster, UK)
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Expert Shield - THE Screen Protectors for: Sony Cameras *Lifetime Guarantee* (Sony A7 Full Frame/A7R/A7S Crystal Clear Expert Shield)
Expert Shield - THE Screen Protectors for: Sony Cameras *Lifetime Guarantee* (Sony A7 Full Frame/A7R/A7S Crystal Clear Expert Shield)
Offered by Expert Shield
Price: £7.95

4.0 out of 5 stars Swings and roundabouts, 26 Feb. 2015
One of the nice features of the Sony A7S full-frame mirrorless camera is its high quality tilting rear LED display screen. Sadly, this display screen does not fully rotate out of the way when not in use and so is permanently exposed on the back of the camera, making it susceptible to greasing from handling and viewfinder usage, as well as everyday knocks and scuffs. It makes sense, therefore, to consider fitting some sort of protection to this screen, especially given the camera's hefty almost £2000 price tag.

The "Crystal Clear Expert Shield" offers what at first glimpse appears to be a fairly standard protective film approach. Upon opening the product, however, it is clear that production quality is a notch up on the usual cheap tablet and smartphone protective films, which invariably degrade screen visibility, either with their poor optical quality, or else with air pockets that invariably get trapped under them whilst they are being applied and which are them impossible to push out. The "Expert Shield" is high transparency and has a reflectivity that closely matches that of the A7S screen.

Fitting the "Expert Shield" is no easy matter, though, and it is worth reading and rereading the instructions carefully so that you are comfortable with what the operation entails before you start. Like all such films, it appears to attract any and all dust and tiny specks of dirt from miles around as soon as you peel away the backing sheet from the sticky surface, making it imperative that you not only wipe away all dust and grease from the screen itself before applying the shield but also choose a dust- and dirt-free work area for the fitting operation. I failed to do this on my first attempt and ended up with a ruined shield as a consequence. The manufacturers assured me that it should be perfectly possible to clean the product with some sticky tape but they kindly replaced it for me anyway, under their much-vaunted "Lifetime Warranty" policy -- for which the product definitely gets a bonus star!

I was more successful on my second attempt, but even though I thought I had been scrupulous in cleaning around the work area, I still managed to get one small speck of something on the sticky surface just as I was about to apply it to the screen. The recommended sticky tape trick did the job this time, though. As noted by another reviewer, however, the version supplied for the A7S seems just a tiny fraction of a millimetre too long for the camera screen and I therefore found it impossible to get all of the edges to sit perfectly flat. Squeezing the few bubbles that got trapped was, however, fairly straightforward.

I also found it tricky to persuade the final layer of protective film to come away without it simply lifting the Shield from the screen. Whether this was because the film was a less than perfect fit, or because it is actually too low a tack for the highly polished (and, I suspect, coated) screen of the Sony is hard to say. As a result, for the first few days that the Shield was in place, it was all too easy to catch it on things that lifted one corner and threatened to peel it off. After a while, however, it seemed to bed down somewhat and it no longer seems to be prone to this.

Optically, the Shield does not impair the Sony's superb screen quality to any significant degree, as long as you keep it clean. I do find, however, that it picks up finger and face grease even more readily than the screen does on its own, as well as being harder to clean except with the lint-free cloth supplied. The Sony screen always came up spotless for me with a wipe of any convenient cloth or tissue -- even a sleeve in extremis. Treat the Shield that way, though, and you will be left with a statically attracted layer of lint uniformly distributed across its surface!

I am still not sure whether or not to recommend the product. On the one hand, it is a comparatively small price to pay to protect a potentially vulnerable part of an expensive piece of kit and the company behind it are unparalleled in their commitment to customer satisfaction. On the other, it appears to necessitate a small but appreciable extra level of care to be applied to the cleaning of the screen to keep it looking its best. I am not sure if what is lost on the swings is, in fact, regained on the roundabout, in this case. Perhaps time will tell.
Comment Comments (2) | Permalink | Most recent comment: Feb 27, 2015 12:10 PM GMT


AmazonBasics Bluetooth Stereo Headset with Microphone
AmazonBasics Bluetooth Stereo Headset with Microphone

4.0 out of 5 stars Good quality cordless stereo headphone solution, 26 Feb. 2015
Customer review from the Amazon Vine Programme (What's this?)
Amazon's own brand "AmazonBasics Bluetooth Stereo Headphones with microphone" is a reasonable pair of wireless headphones, offering lightweight and cord-free sound for any bluetooth sound device, such as smartphone, laptop computer, MP3 player, tablet or Kindle Fire HD. I tested them with both Android smartphone and Macbook computer. In both cases, bluetooth pairing was simple and rapid, although I did have problems with the Macbook periodically dropping the connection, even though I was always within a metre of it, although this may have had more to do with the ageing nature of my Macbook than any intrinsic fault in the 'phones; I didn't have the same problem when paired with the phone.

Music quality from iTunes on the laptop was reasonable but not stunning; clarity was good, without any noticeable gaps in frequency. Lovers of heavy bass may find the sound a little too lightweight for their taste; lovers of high volumes may find them disappointing too. Sound levels from the Samsung Galaxy smartphone was another matter altogether, however, with the phone well able to overdrive them, even on a very low volume setting.

Microphone quality is surprisingly good too, giving a clearer call than from the phone's built in microphone. One issue to be aware of, though, if using these for handsfree calling is that if you aren't actually wearing the headphones on your ears, but are simply wearing them around your neck, they quickly generate an horrendous feedback howl for the caller. While this may be a good way of dealing with nuisance callers, it's probably not a good way to keep your friends!

Once you've worked out how to wear them, the headphones are very comfortable as well as stable. Indeed, it's very easy to forget they're there. No pricing information was available at the time of writing, so it's hard to say whether or not these represent good value. They are certainly well worth having if you need a reasonable quality cordless stereo headphone solution.


Let the Devil Sleep (Dave Gurney 3)
Let the Devil Sleep (Dave Gurney 3)
by John Verdon
Edition: Paperback
Price: £7.99

5.0 out of 5 stars Well-paced, complex thriller, 22 Feb. 2015
"Let the Devil Sleep" is the third of John Verdon's novels featuring retired New York detective, Dave Gurney, and follows on from the earlier "Think of a Number" and "Shut Your Eyes Tight". The marked improvement in plot construction and tension building that was evident in the second of these novels is carried through into this third, making this the author's best novel yet.

Pacing is excellent throughout the book, which is mercifully free of any annoying side interludes. In addition, Dave Gurney's personal issues are much better integrated into this story than into either of the other two and don't interfere at all with the story flow but rather add to it quite considerably. Although the plot is complex, the reader is provided with more than enough clues to identify the killer long before Gurney himself gets there, which, whilst not saying much for John Verdon's view of America's finest does at least make for a satisfying read.

As is generally the case in these novels, the final showdown is terribly over the top but makes for a tense and exciting wrap-up to the tale. I am looking forward to the next outing, "Peter Pan Must Die".


A Man Called Ove
A Man Called Ove
by Fredrik Backman
Edition: Hardcover
Price: £4.99

5.0 out of 5 stars Hilarious but poignant, 22 Feb. 2015
This review is from: A Man Called Ove (Hardcover)
A man called Ove is a cantankerous old soul -- in that way old souls generally become cantankerous when they are surrounded by imbeciles and incompetents who can't so much as obey a simple sign, or climb a ladder to unstick a window without falling off, and who don't even know how to repair a bicycle or reverse a trailer any more.

"A Man Called Ove" is also one of the most hilariously poignant reads you are ever likely to encounter any side of old age. In this, his first novel, Swedish blogger, Fredrik Backmann, has managed to capture to perfection the feelings and attitudes that sixty years of honest toil in the face of life's vicissitudes so often engenders. In Ove, the author has created the perfect grumpy old man who wants nothing more than to get on with the business of dying, while the rest of the world has completely different ideas about what he needs to be doing. For an author so young, the book is written with great insight not only into people's personalities and how these affect their inter-relations, but also into the nature of growing old and of the human condition generally, albeit one tempered here with a dusting of comic simplicity. Additionally, the book has an air of farce that offsets the underlying serious message and ensures that it delivers poignancy without any tendency towards cloying melancholy.

The book is a funny and entertaining read from start to finish, beautifully structured to reveal just as much of Ove's past as you need at any moment to understand and appreciate his actions and attitudes in the present. In the process, you'll come to love Ove as you would a favorite dotty uncle.

Highly recommended.


Oral B Pro 3000 White and Clean Electric Rechargeable Toothbrush
Oral B Pro 3000 White and Clean Electric Rechargeable Toothbrush
Price: £89.99

0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars More of the same (but different), 21 Feb. 2015
Customer review from the Amazon Vine Programme (What's this?)
The "Oral B Pro 3000" electric toothbrush from Braun is clearly an upper-end product. It has an excellent build-quality, comes with a range of different brush heads in the box (2 x 3D White aka Normal; 1 x Sensitive; 1 x Cross Action gum care) and various operating features such as three different motor speeds/actions and a quadrant timer facility to help you spent the recommended amount of time cleaning each of your teeth.

Whether or not this is the electric toothbrush for you, however, or even whether or not it is actually an improvement over an ordinary 50p manual toothbrush, are difficult issues to address. Personally, I dislike having this amount of noise and vibration in or around my head. Quite apart from the disquieting feeling it gives of being in the dentist's chair, I also found the brush quite tricky to use effectively compared with a normal toothbrush, as well as a fair bit messier. Its increased bulk makes it harder to manoeuvre around the mouth, whilst the combination of the generally softer heads and motorised action makes its precise position harder to sense than a manual brush. On the other hand, its over-pressure sensor is useful, especially for those with a propensity towards heavy-handedness, although this is something of mixed blessing, because if you close your lips around the brush at, the over-pressure sensor kicks in and the action shuts off. I have to say, though, teeth do feel cleaner afterwards than they do with a manual brush -- unless the extra tingle is just from the vibrations!

Some of the features of this model feel to be more gimmick than truly useful features, though. The quadrant and two-minute timers -- indicated by stutterings in the brush's running -- are easy to miss, especially if you're at all close to tripping the over-pressure cut-out. On the other hand, it is better than having the brush run for just two minutes and then stop, as some other brands do. The Pro 3000's three brushing modes I found hard to distinguish and the need to cycle through the remaining modes to get back to 'off' makes it impossible to switch off quickly if you need to. Another irritation is Braun's reluctance to label the brush heads in any way, so that in order to determine which is which, you have to peer carefully at them and compare their bristle patterns and arrangement with illustrations on a leaflet.

In common with all electric toothbrushes, the charger requires you to have a shaver-style power outlet in or close to your bathroom, otherwise you'll not only need a shaver adapter but also will have to leave the charger and brush holder in a room other than the bathroom. The Pro 3000 has a somewhat longer running time between charges than many of its competitors but the downside to this is that it also need a full 20+ hours of charging should it ever be allowed to go completely flat (which Braun recommend you do periodically anyway to remove any memory effect and get the maximum life out of the battery.)

All in the all, then, the Braun "Oral B Pro 3000" strikes me as being an electric toothbrush much like any other. Whether it is better or worse than any other depends very much on what aspects of an electric toothbrush are important to you. Unfortunately, the only way to find out is probably to suck it and see, so to speak. And you can buy an awful lot of manual brushes for the price!


My Grandmother Sends Her Regards and Apologises
My Grandmother Sends Her Regards and Apologises
by Fredrik Backman
Edition: Hardcover
Price: £14.99

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A contemporary fairy story for grown-ups, 9 Feb. 2015
Customer review from the Amazon Vine Programme (What's this?)
-- "Every seven-year-old deserves a superhero. That's just the way it is. Anyone who doesn't agree needs their head examined." --

The opening three sentences of Fredrik Backman's latest book, "My Grandmother Sends Her Regards and Apologises", set the tone for this book right from the outset. They also sum up to perfection the ethos which drives this modern day parable and morality tale, as well as providing an indication of just why it is such an immensely fun read from beginning to end.

I suspect that this book will not find favour with everyone. Many will not like the quirky literary style its author adopts throughout. Some may be confused by the fact that while the book's main protagonist, Elsa, is a young girl with a passion for quality literature (such as that to be found between the covers of Marvel comics) and an abiding belief in her grandmother's made-up stories about the Land-of-Almost-Awake which some might deem unhealthy, this is by no means a book for children, and possible not even one for young adults.

Some readers may be put off too by the seemingly flat portrayal -- as cartoon caricatures almost -- of the characters who inhabit the story alongside Elsa. This, however, is perfectly in keeping with a world which is largely described as if through the eyes of an almost-eight-year old. One of the great joys of this book, however, is the author's clever handling of slow and subtle changes not only within the characters themselves but also in Elsa's understanding and perception of each of them as the story unfolds.

Without any doubt, "My Grandmother Sends Her Regards and Apologises" is firmly aimed at grown-ups. It is a book about the power of story-telling to help people make sense of a troubled world and to help them to summon the strength to live through the unpleasant events that life throws up at every turn. It is a book about the power of love to transcend those troubles which afflict us. It is a book about the importance of honour and commitment in living our lives and the dangers of becoming blind to the smaller commitments we may overlook in the pursuit of the larger ones. It is also a book about the liberating power of non-conformity to turn everyone into a superhero of one kind or another. Even without the others, that last alone would make this a book very much worth reading, because at the end of the day, the world can never have too many superheroes. And anyone who doesn't agree needs their head examined.


A Robot In The Garden
A Robot In The Garden
by Deborah Install
Edition: Paperback
Price: £12.08

3.0 out of 5 stars An odd little singularity, 3 Feb. 2015
This review is from: A Robot In The Garden (Paperback)
Customer review from the Amazon Vine Programme (What's this?)
Deborah Install's latest book, "A Robot in the Garden", is a very strange little entity indeed. The author tells us that the seed for this book was a chance remark made one evening to her husband, which germinated into an idea for a character, and which in turn led to the blossoming of this entire tale of coming of age, the acceptance of responsibility and stepping up to parenthood. The tale reads as though the author's imagination has been in greater control of its direction and formulation than has her rational intellect, though. As a result, the book is not as well polished as it could have been, and is every bit as frustrating as it is amusing.

It is also hard to fathom just what the author's intended audience might be. Some aspects of the book are probably too 'adult' to be appropriate for children or even young adults. At the same time, much of the book lacks the sophistication or structure that a more mature readership might look for. If asked to pick an audience for whom it might work, I would probably point at those newly into parenthood, or else shortly to be embarking upon it.

The story is essentially a standard "there and back again" tale of self-discovery, with many hilarious events and quite a few poignant ones too, along the way. What lets it down and prevents it from being an out-and-out funny and heart-warming story are the flat and stereotypical characters with which it is populated and the all-too-obvious direction of travel of the story arc, undermining what originality it has. Given the inventiveness of many of the story elements, it is a great shame that more was not done to tie things together into a more coherent and less rambling whole.

The book is worth a look if you are wanting something a little quirky and different from the norm. As a light and fuzzy read, with a decent feel-good score, the book is well on the way to scoring four stars. Its technical deficiencies, however, prevent me from awarding more than three; your mileage may vary.


10-Day Green Smoothie Cleanse: Lose Up to 15 Pounds in 10 Days!
10-Day Green Smoothie Cleanse: Lose Up to 15 Pounds in 10 Days!
by J.J. Smith
Edition: Paperback
Price: £7.99

4 of 5 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Perpetuating the myth of the detox, 28 Jan. 2015
Customer review from the Amazon Vine Programme (What's this?)
J.J. Smith claims that her book "10-day Green Smoothie Cleanse" will help you to lose up to 15 pounds in ten days. With a price tag of £9.99, I guess the first ten pounds are lost on day one...

The book itself is a slim volume, consisting of just short of 170 pages, overall. The first 35 offer an introductory explanation of why anyone might need to "cleanse" with green smoothies (which can be summarised as "because you do".) There then follows a shopping list of goodies that you'll need to buy in order to stock up for your 10-day smoothie-fest, followed by a short section of tips on preparing for and staying the 10-day distance. This includes details of the on-line support group who will assist you with long-distance encouragement.

This middle section of the book is also pretty much chocker with cod-scientific explanations (mostly complete bunkum, I'm afraid) of why one might be overweight in the first place (a liver in need of cleansing because of all of those nasty toxins you are exposed to daily appears to be the likeliest cause; oddly, overeating is never mentioned even as a possibility) and what to expect when you "detox" by following the diet that the author steadfastly refuses to call a diet. She warns that you can expect headaches, pains, nausea and other unpleasant side effects. She reassures you that these are the beneficial and encouraging signs that your body is responding to your new dietary regime and releasing all of those stored up toxins for flushing away. (Quite why they will be flushed away now when they weren't before is never explained.)

In reality, for those used to hefty coffee drinking, the headaches are most likely due to caffeine withdrawal. They are also likely to occur owing to low blood sugar (because of the severe calorie shortage in your daily food intake) or, more dangerously, to hyponatraemia -- "water intoxication" -- caused by the massively increased water intake that the author advocates. Drinking too much water dilutes the blood, reducing sodium levels and flooding cells and organs with water, including the cells of the brain, which swell, thereby increasing pressure in the skull. Other more serious possible side effects of hyponatraemia include seizures and breathing problems. In short, hyponatraemia can be fatal and responding to headaches by drinking more water -- as the author advises -- can be very dangerous indeed. The headaches are a warning sign that something is wrong and that you need to proceed carefully.

The book then proceeds to a chunk of testimonials and success stories, which feels an odd addition, suggesting that the author feels she needs to combat her lack of any real credentials for this book with a hefty dose of "unbiased and unsolicited" proof that it works. Rather like an advertisement for a double glazing company.

The book concludes with some 50 pages or so of smoothie recipes. These are all essentially permutations on a small number of mixes of greens, frozen fruit (mostly berries, peaches and pineapple), water or ice with the occasional new ingredient, such as ginger, added for variety. Many of the recipes needlessly use the health food industry's latest wonder "discovery", stevia, as a sweetener. (If you haven't encountered stevia before, it is a pricey, zero-calorie, zero-carbohydrate sweetener extracted from the leaf of the stevia plant, which is about 200 times sweeter than traditional sugar. It has long been used as a sweetener in Japan but has only recently found favour in the West owing to it being a 'natural' low calorie product, which somehow makes it sound healthier and better for you than either refined sugar or an artificial sweetener. Those who sing its virtues as a more natural product than refined sugar conveniently overlook the fact that commercial stevia powder has been through pretty much the same processing stages as cane sugar. In addition, recent tests suggest that stevia's sweetness actually fools the brain into preparing for sugar that never arrives, triggering an insulin release, thus negating any weight-loss benefits it may have.)

By now you can no doubt tell that whilst I agree with the author that her green smoothie mixes offer a healthier dietary option than most modern refined, processed or pre-prepared foodstuffs, I have real difficulties recommending this book. I do not doubt that anyone who follows the regime prescribed here will lose weight as a result (especially if their current diet is excessive or features a predominance of sweetened, refined or processed foods.) Cutting one's calorie intake is bound to do that. They'll probably feel better for it, too. But an approach to healthier eating and to weight loss generally does not need to be either this proscriptive or this prescriptive. Or this wrapped around with convenient and fanciful explanations of why it works.
Comment Comments (2) | Permalink | Most recent comment: Jan 29, 2015 8:30 PM GMT


Ultrasport Women's Montpellier Tennis Top - Purple, Medium
Ultrasport Women's Montpellier Tennis Top - Purple, Medium
Price: £25.00

4.0 out of 5 stars Flexible and breathable; very figure-hugging, 19 Jan. 2015
Customer review from the Amazon Vine Programme (What's this?)
Ultrasport's "Montpellier" tennis top for women is a light-weight sports top, made of elastane and with low-profile seams, designed to minimise sources of fabric irritation during high energy and extended mobility sports and exercise activities. The fabric is breathable, rapidly wicking away sweat and drying quickly after washing. It has printed manufacturer's logos and labels, with no irritating edges or sewing.

The top is very snug-fitting, its figure-hugging design intended to eliminate any chance of loose fabric interfering with your play or exercise, while the stretchy material facilitates unimpeded movement. This does mean, though, that the material will show off every contour of either abs or flabs, as the case may be. I'll leave you to decide for yourself whether that is a good thing or not.


The Evolutionist; The Strange Tale of Alfred Russel Wallace
The Evolutionist; The Strange Tale of Alfred Russel Wallace
by Avi Sirlin
Edition: Paperback
Price: £9.55

3.0 out of 5 stars An odd hybrid, possibly poorly adapted for survival, 14 Jan. 2015
Customer review from the Amazon Vine Programme (What's this?)
Whilst the name Charles Darwin is universally associated with the formulation of the theory of evolution of biological species through the operation of the forces of natural selection, the figure of Alfred Russel Wallace lurks more as a spectre behind the scenes of Victorian natural history and scientific endeavour -- if, that is, he is even known about at all. Lacking in any formal education beyond the age of 14 and of poor, working-class background (in contrast to Darwin's own wealthy status and possession of Cambridge degree) Alfred Wallace struggled for much of his life against the prejudices of the privileged-class members of Britain's scientific societies, who passed off much of his hard-won achievements and accomplishments as mere amateur field naturalism lacking the rigours of the scientific approach, or the discipline of academic focus.

In reality, Wallace was a dedicated -- some might even say fanatical -- collector of natural specimens and a fastidious documenter of all that he collected, saw or encountered and who explored areas into which few, if any, white men had previously dared venture. In his early twenties, he spent four years exploring, mapping and collecting wildlife in the Amazon rainforest; later, between 1854 and 1862, aged 31-39, he travelled extensively around the Malay Archipelago (now Singapore, Malaysia and Indonesia) where he amassed some 126,000 specimens of mammals, birds, insects (including more than 80,000 beetles alone). Several thousand of the species he collected and described were entirely new to science at that time. In 1869, Wallace published an account of his time in the far east ("The Malay Archipelago") which became one of the most popular accounts of scientific exploration ever published; it has never been out of print. The most important work that Wallace undertook during those years and which made him famous in his time is largely forgotten today.

Whilst Wallace was exploring and gathering specimens throughout the archipelago, he became fascinated by the vast array of animal and plant species that he encountered and puzzled over the often subtle differences which distinguished the species populating one island from those of another. His deliberation on these differences and their distribution led him independently to his own theory about natural selection as the driving force behind the emergence of new species. Mindful of his lack of standing within the scientific establishment, in 1858 he sent a draft article outlining his theory to Darwin for his opinion, and asking that Darwin share the article with Charles Lyell for his judgement also.

For Darwin, the knowledge that another had hit upon the very theory that he himself had been developing for publication for some time (but which, by his own admission at that time still required "many more years' work") was sufficient catalyst for him to rethink his own plans for how his ideas on evolution needed to be prepared for public consumption. Unbeknown to Wallace, his 'draft' essay, together with a paper by Darwin himself, were presented by Charles Lyell to a special meeting of the Linnean Society of London in July 1858. Both men were credited with independently arriving at the same idea at the same time. Following the meeting, Darwin speedily prepared his "On the Origin of Species " for publication in 1859. Wallace, out of touch throughout this time in the wilds of Irian Jaya, remained ignorant of these developments until 1860. He did not return to London and civilisation until 1862, by which time Darwin had spent four years alone in the limelight and the rest, as they say, is pretty much history as far as public recognition of the originator of the theory goes.

It is testimony to the character of Wallace that he never exhibited or expressed any rancour over what many at the time and since have perceived as a gross unfairness to him. Every now and then, another article or book emerges trying to rectify things by examining afresh the man, his achievements and his contributions to the advancement of evolutionary theory and bio-geography. The latest addition to this pantheon is "The Evolutionist" by Canadian writer, Avi Sirlin. Rather than risk a potentially dry biography (and thereby have to compete with Peter Raby's fairly definitive "Alfred Russel Wallace", or even Wallace's own account, "My Life: A Record of Events and Opinion".) Avi Sirlin's approach has been to dramatise the events of Wallace's life and present matters in the form of a novel. In order to do this effectively, he admits that he has to invent new characters as composites of real ones, imagine meetings and encounters that probably never took place, as well as to reorder somewhat the chronology of his subject's life.

The author has also invented a faux Victorian literary style in which to convey his narrative, presumably in order to evoke something of Wallace's own writing style. Sadly, I found it imbued with too many trans-Atlantic grammar, terminology and spelling lapses for it to feel in anyway authentic. To me, it is merely lumbering and ponderous; it may put many readers off altogether, as it is far from being an easy read. Writing styles aside, though, the book itself is both engaging and absorbing, if also a little lurching in its structure -- how sad that real lives so rarely follow the most satisfying narrative arc!

I have no idea how authentic Avi Sirlin's portrayal of Wallace's odd mix of naivety, misplaced self-confidence and rank humility may be, but the author certainly makes a convincing job of it. The books many faults make it hard to give this particular publication wholehearted endorsement but any volume which makes Wallace's name better known (even if potentially for the wrong things) has to be welcomed, even with so many already out there.


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