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J. Welford (UK)
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LL TRADER For LG Google Nexus 5 D820 D821 Black LCD Display and Glass Touch Screen Digitizer with Frame (matte finish) Assembly Replacement
LL TRADER For LG Google Nexus 5 D820 D821 Black LCD Display and Glass Touch Screen Digitizer with Frame (matte finish) Assembly Replacement
Offered by verydeal
Price: £31.89

2 of 3 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Functional but developed bright spots, 27 Jan. 2016
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
I had previously performed a screen replacement on my nexus 5 using a product that did not come with the frame. This was a pain as I had to mess about with glue. For this replacement I made sure to get one that came with a frame, which did make the job easier.

Initially the screen worked well and it would be hard to notice that it wasn't original. However after a few weeks I started to notice a couple of bright spots on the screen. These have developed into about 5 separate spots that are quite noticeable.

Although the frame is black, the plastic itself seems to be a gloss black, which has then been painted matt black to match the back of the nexus 5 case. This paint has started to wear off in general use. Not a big problem, but not perfect.

I would have submitted a complaint about the bright spots on the screen, but unfortunately the screen has also now cracked. This happened whilst the phone was in my pocket, so I believe it is from flexing. Hard to say of this is due to any weakness in the screen, although I suspect the original screen would have survived.


Alps Mountain Biking: From Aosta to Zermatt: the Best Singletrack, Enduro and Downhill Trails in the Alps
Alps Mountain Biking: From Aosta to Zermatt: the Best Singletrack, Enduro and Downhill Trails in the Alps
by Steve Mallett
Edition: Paperback
Price: £16.55

6 of 7 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Look at the photos, read it, get inspired, go riding., 10 Jun. 2015
Although I've not yet been to the Alps with this book, I have ridden there a number of times previously, including visiting several of the destinations listed. I would therefore like to offer a review, based on my initial reading of it, and from my own experience of mountain biking in the Alps.

First of all, it can't be overstated quite how exceptional a destination this is for mountain biking. In the 10 years since I first visited it has really increased in both popularity and facilities for riders, with lifts in most areas now set up to accommodate bikes during the summer season. A good quality guide to the locations and terrain is therefore long overdue, and is what this book provides. As with all vertebrate books it is well researched, well written and beautifully presented, therefore fulfilling its first and most important purpose - to get you inspired and onto the internet booking your holiday.

If you are considering a riding trip there then buy the book, get inspired, get your travel and accommodation sorted, and then spend any spare cash you have on your bike and some spares.

That said, I have some more detailed comments on the book that I'd like to add:

Photos:
These are stunning, but they do give the impression of a lot of smashing down downhill courses - even where this is not the case - as most of them show a full-face helmet wearing rider without a bag. Whilst it is certainly possible to ride like this, in my experience an open face is just as suitable for lots of the terrain (more so if there is any amount of pedalling involved) and a bag with food, drink and spares is essential. The intro to the book even states as much, suggesting at least a litre of water in a camelback, along with plenty of other good advice on maps and spares, ironically opposite a photo of a chap happily manualling along with none of the above!

Layout:
The book lists destinations in alphabetical order, which is fine it you have heard of a location and want to know more about it, but for me half the point of the book is finding out about some of the areas that I'm not so familiar with, so I'd much prefer to see it laid out in some kind of geographical order. It does provide a map of where everything is, which helps, but not until page 14, making it difficult to find whilst skimming through; it would be nice to have this on one of the inside covers.

Grading:
I struggled with this somewhat. Where individual routes are shown on a map (which is only a select few per area) they don't get given a grade, instead the whole area gets a grade range, on the scale blue-red-black. All the locations include black (advanced), but only 7of the 31 main spots include blue (ok for most riders). This leaves all the rest with a vague red-to-black grading, except for Zermatt which is only black. I'm surprised that this location gets ranked as more advanced than others, as I certainly found the riding harder in, for example, Verbier. Perhaps it was just the particular trails we chose at each destination, however this just goes to highlight the limitations of the grading system. Although it might be helpful for beginners to find a good spot, how will they know which trails to choose once they get there?

Singletrack/Enduro/XC/Downhill:
I know that Enduro is the latest buzzword in mountain biking (coming in where terms like 'freeride', 'all-mountain' and 'trail' left off), and I totally understand its use with regard to racing, but I do struggle a bit to see how it helps me in a book like this. Although certain areas are highlighted as being good for certain things, I wouldn't pay too much attention to them, there is generally a variety of good stuff to be found everywhere.

Those minor niggles aside, overall it's a really good book. It's already getting me psyched for riding there this summer, and it will definitely be coming with me when I go.


Geeta's Lime and Chilli Chutney 310 g (Pack of 6)
Geeta's Lime and Chilli Chutney 310 g (Pack of 6)
Offered by Healthy Living for You
Price: £39.95

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Best chutney ever, 10 Jun. 2014
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
Very limey and chilliy, without being too much.

I've tried quite a few lime chutneys both from jars and in restaurants, and in my opinion this is the best.


Systems Engineering with SysML/UML: Modeling, Analysis, Design (The MK/OMG Press)
Systems Engineering with SysML/UML: Modeling, Analysis, Design (The MK/OMG Press)
by Tim Weilkiens
Edition: Paperback
Price: £36.99

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Useful, but a mixed bag, 10 Jun. 2014
This book assumes no prior knowledge of Systems Engineering or diagramming practices. It provides an overview of SysML along with various examples. Unfortunately (for me at least) it also includes a lot of detail on the authors "SYSMOD" approach to systems engineering using SysML. Whilst there is some useful information in here, it is far from the only systems engineering methodolgy. The fact that this approach is presented, using SysML examples, BEFORE the details of the raw UML and SysML diagrams are given, really serves to confuse as much as assist.

There is also a tendency to explain SysML by using SysML diagrams, which can lead to something of a circular loop that the reader must "break into" before a complete understanding of the authors point can be gained.

Overall it provided a sound introduction to the language and would be very useful if the reader also wished to use the SYSMOD approach. If another set of engineering practices are to be followed, then I would suggest that the reader skip forwards onto Chapters 3 and 4, coming back to the early discussions if necessary.

I have since skimmed through a copy of "SysML for Systems Engineering" by Jon Holt and Simon Perry, which I thought provided a better introduction to the language (albeit for a significantly higher price).


WHITE KING Bed Size WAFFLE Print, 300 Thread Count Luxury Egyptian Cotton, Duvet Cover and Pillow Cases Bedding Set, By VICEROY BEDDING
WHITE KING Bed Size WAFFLE Print, 300 Thread Count Luxury Egyptian Cotton, Duvet Cover and Pillow Cases Bedding Set, By VICEROY BEDDING
Offered by Viceroy Bedding
Price: £21.95

2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Comfortable, but delicate, 27 Mar. 2013
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
I bought this as I wanted an Egyptian cotton duvet cover that was slightly different to plain white. The waffle effect looks fairly attractive in the pictures and indeed is visually quite appealing on my bed, however the waffle effect is not actually a print, as the product title implies, but actually a artefact of the way the cover is woven. The small squares are raised and slightly loose threads in the fabric.

This makes the cover quite fragile and prone to snag on things. This is not too much of a problem on the duvet (unless you regularly use the top of your bed as a workspace or similar) as the underside is a plain and smooth weave. The pillowcases are another matter, as you are clearly expected to sleep with your face on the waffle side. A restless night or stubbly face will quickly leave the pillow snagged and worn. After only a couple of weeks use it was very clear which of the two pillows I had slept on the most.

I have now had to turn the pillows over to use the plain side and I do not expect the whole set to last particularly long. Additionally the duvet opening has a button closure that seems unreliable (requiring rebuttoning every week or so).

Durability aside, it fits my duvet and pillows well and is comfortable to sleep in.


Economics: A Very Short Introduction (Very Short Introductions)
Economics: A Very Short Introduction (Very Short Introductions)
by Partha Dasgupta
Edition: Paperback
Price: £4.99

0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Not as simple and well-written as it needs to be, 19 Oct. 2011
I picked up this book to try to gain a basic understanding of simple economic concepts and theories. Having recently read the two (excellent) Freakonomics books I wanted something that dealt with basic economic theories in a clear and jargon free manner. Unfortunately this book is not it.

Although not totally plagued by jargon I felt that most of the descriptions could have been put more succinctly and would have benefited from better examples. This made it feel like a real chore to read and consequently I have only got about 2/3 of the way through.

Although none of the concepts seem that difficult to grasp, the way they are presented is really not for me hence I don't think I'll bother to finish it.


7dayshop Sport V4.0+EDR Bluetooth Wireless Sport Stereo Earbuds Headphones Headset with Mic - Funk Black
7dayshop Sport V4.0+EDR Bluetooth Wireless Sport Stereo Earbuds Headphones Headset with Mic - Funk Black

4 of 5 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Cheap price, cheap quality, 7 Oct. 2011
After carefully reading through the reviews on here I went for these headphones. I actually bought them direct from 7dayshop as it worked out slightly cheaper.

They arrived the other day and to be honest I'm quite disappointed. Here are the reasons:
1) They feel very cheap, one of the sides is not screwed on properly and is almost falling off already. The buttons all feel quite loose and rattly.
2) They look quite cheap. I'm not one to worry too much about my appearance but the bright blue flashing led on one side is really going to look stupid on the train.
3) They aren't particularly comfortable. They sit on the head fine but the ear cups sit over the middle of the ear and the plastic band sort of grips the head. Not uncomfortable but pretty average.
4) There is quite a lot of sound leakage. This is something that really annoys me on the train (one of the reasons I'm purchasing my own headphones!) so I'm not keen on contributing to the problem; but even at quite a moderate volume someone sitting next to you will definitely be able to hear your music.
5) I'm not sure about the noise/echo cancelling claim mentioned for them, I can't detect any such functionality - I can hear background noise just as well with them on as without!

Otherwise they seem to function fine so far. Sound quality seems passable and volume/skip functions seem to work. I haven't tried the microphone by pairing it with my phone (only ipod and laptop so far). One thing I do like is the fact that they charge from mini-usb, this means I will be able to borrow a cable to recharge them most places even if I don't have the charger with me.

I'm tempted to send them back but I suspect the postage wouldn't be worth it for an item this cheap. Alternatively I might take them apart and hack the electronics into the shell of some larger old wired headphones.

Overall I'm surprised at the high rating in the reviews of this item. I'll give it 2 stars for working, but no more as I can't really see me using them much on the train - what I actually bought them for!


Linx 10.2" Digital Photo Frame
Linx 10.2" Digital Photo Frame

9 of 9 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Great Hardware, Awful Software, 25 Dec. 2007
First of all the hardware for this is pretty decent. It seems well made and the images produced are pretty clear. The brushed effect surround looks good and does not detract from the pictures. The battery is really useful for passing the frame around or showing to relatives etc.

Two slight annoyances with the hardware. Firstly the blue lighted buttons look naff and are difficult to see. They really add nothing apart from indicating what the button functions are. However I believe the plastic surround could be removed and the lights covered with tape. This would make the frame a lot more appealing. Secondly why choose such a ridiculous size for the screen? Who takes pictures in widescreen? The result is that either a lot of image trimming and resizing is required or there will be black bars either side of the image. I guess the screens are the same as those manufactured for portable DVD players and this is the reason for the sizing.

Really these are both minor hardware issues though. The real problem is the software. They couldn't possibly make it worse if they tried. I would say that I'm pretty computer literate and I really struggled to simply use it. There is quite a lot of useful information in the other reviews, but here are a few more pointers:

Resize (and trim) your pictures to the resolution recommended in another review (1312x736) to fill the screen before you upload them. Any other ratio will leave bars, either side. Any smaller and they will not fill the screen at all.

Rotate your pictures before you upload them as you can rotate them on the frame but the rotation does not stay when you skip off them.

Plugging into the mini USB to connect to the computer did not work for me.

Follow the other advice here for copying from cards to the internal memory, a very lengthy process for a lot of pictures.

There is no shuffle or random. Why do very few frames come with this? It seems like such a fundamental feature.

The auto on and off works daily rather than on specified dates as the menu seems to suggest.

I experienced some 'freezing' where the frame would lock up for a short period (a minute or two) in both the video and movie play modes. It always came back and I believe it was due to not being able to read from the card fast enough, as it worked fine when copied to the internal memory. Perhaps a faster card would have worked better.

The rate of stepping through is very fast, even on the 'slow' setting.

There are options for stepping between pictures, I found that the fade option looked best, although it still wasn't great.

There is no way of knowing how much charge is left in it.

Altogether this could have really nice with some sensible software, however as it is I am surprised at the amount of praise it gets. It is passable, but a bit of a disappointment.


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