Shop now Shop now Shop now See more Shop all Amazon Fashion Cloud Drive Photos Shop now Learn More Shop now DIYED Shop now Shop Fire Shop Kindle Shop now Shop now Shop now
Profile for Sir Furboy > Reviews

Personal Profile

Content by Sir Furboy
Top Reviewer Ranking: 5,913
Helpful Votes: 1618

Learn more about Your Profile.

Reviews Written by
Sir Furboy (Aberystwyth, UK)

Show:  
Page: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11-20
pixel
German Demystified: A Self Teaching Guide
German Demystified: A Self Teaching Guide
Price: £11.25

4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Manages to Actually Demystify German!, 21 July 2011
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
I never got along with German at school, but I wanted to pick this language up as an adult. I remain a long way from fluent, but having worked through this book I now have enough German to make myself understood, and even managed to read a couple of short German works. This book does indeed demystify the language.

There are elements of German that do seem convoluted and hard, but at the end of this book I thought "is that all of it"?

Well obviously learning a langyuage goes beyone reading one work, but this is a good one for building confidence and competence in the language. It is well written and easy to follow.


A Bridge to the Stars (Joel Gustafson Stories Book 1)
A Bridge to the Stars (Joel Gustafson Stories Book 1)
Price: £4.99

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A Very Special Story, 18 July 2011
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
Joel is 11. Living is a small Swedish community, we are given priveleged access into his life and thoughts as he explores his world by night as well as by day. The characters he meets are intriguing - and sometimes not so nice.

The story quickly draws you in as Joel does some learning and growing up. I think the genre of this book is something like a coming of age story, but it can't be pigeon holed so easily. A good read for young adults and adults alike, that will keep you reading and then set you thinking.

The story is Swedish in orgin. The translation is just fine though, and the Swedish background adds considerably to the interest.

This will be on my recommended list for young adults.


Septimus Heap, Book Six: Darke
Septimus Heap, Book Six: Darke

13 of 14 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A Most Enjoyable Series, 18 July 2011
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
I have read all this series in ebook form, and for once that worked greatly to my advantage as I had not realised, when my preorder became available, that I was getting the kindle edition long before the hard back hits the shelves in the UK. Why we in the UK should be made to wait so long is not clear to me, as this is a perfect summer read for children and young adults, as well as adults who enjoy a thoroughly engaging tale, with a huge cast of wonderful characters.

If you found Darke first, please note that this is part of a series that starts with the book "Magyk". Magyk is a wonderful piece of writing and you should go and buy it now. No seriously, right now!

If you are still reading this review it is either because you ignored my advice (shame on you) or you have enjoyed this series so much that like me you are still reading it as quickly as you can. If that is the case, I am wasting my time telling you how good a story it all is, so here are some thoughts on the latest book.

Darke begins on the eve of Septimus and Princess Jenna's 14th birthday. They are on the brink of adulthood as measured in their society, and things are changing. Septimus is also about to embark on yet another extraordinarily dangerous parts of his apprenticeship - Darke Week. Add to that a banishing accident with poor Alther, and the return of some other shady characters and you have all the elements of another page-turning tale. Your only regret reading this is likely to be that the story is over, and you have to wait so long for the next installment.

I give the story five stars. It is as good as ever. If I have some minor criticisms, these would be that maybe the humour was not quite so quick coming as earlier books. And yet the quirky humour is still very much in evidence. There are also some literary references that may or may not suit the story (depending on your mood). A refernce to "Their and Back Again lane" pays homage to "The Hobbit" and the character Bertie Bott will certainly have everyone thinking of every flavour beans.

This series bears some resemblance to Harry Potter of course. It is about a student in magic (or magyk at least). It is to span 7 books, and the quirky humour is reminiscent of JK Rowling's style. But these books are anything but derivative or formulaic. This is a very different tale in a very different world, and is in no way a Harry Potter clone. So I am not quite sure why we have Bertie Bott! But like all the other characters, Bertie is interesting.

I particularly like Angie Sage's endings (and the epilogues), and this book is no exception.

A first class read. It may not be the best book I have ever read in my life but it richly deserves five stars.


Denby Greenwich Craftman's Mug
Denby Greenwich Craftman's Mug
Offered by Debenhams
Price: £10.80

5.0 out of 5 stars Good Sized Mug, 6 May 2011
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
Denby is what it is. Good functional but also stylish crockery with a modern feel. This mug is a good size.It was delivered well packaged from Amazon and promptly too. No complaints at all.


I Am Number Four (Lorien Legacies)
I Am Number Four (Lorien Legacies)
by Pittacus Lore
Edition: Paperback

4.0 out of 5 stars A Good Light Read - Good Choice for Young Readers, 6 May 2011
This book is another of those books that is getting a good deal of attention through aggressive promotion and a kind of lemming effect. It is a long way from the best story I have ever read, but it is still enjoyable. If I was reading it for my own pleasure as an adult reader (who likes young adult books), I would rate it perhaps a 3 star book. My 9 year old daughter, on the other hand, would maybe rate it at 5. Not as good as Garth Nix or Harry Potter in her opinion, but a cracking book all the same. I split the difference and give it four stars

Number Four, who takes the pseudonym "John Smith" is not just an ordinary boy growing up in a mid west American town. He is in fact an alien from another world - one of 9 specially chosen aliens protected by a "charm" that ensures none can be killed out of order. And sure enough there are evil aliens trying their best to kill these children.

Does this sound like the plot of the TV series Roswell? Sure it does. And so the special powers the children develop, and the way that each has different powers comes as no surprise at all.

If you watched and enjoyed Roswell, this book will maybe irritate you. It is not a patch on that TV series, although it explores many of the same ideas that made people watch it. On the other hand, if you never watched the TV series 9and its a few years old now), then you will probably love this book for the same reason. The target audience is children and young adult, and in the same way that children will love Twilight and Eragon, they will love this book.

Anyone wanting something deep an literary - look elsewhere.

Some things that annoyed me:

As a parent reading this book, I had to explain a swear word to my 9 year old. It was not necessary in this book, and considering the target audience, it could have been left out.

As someone who knew more about astronomy than this author when I was 11 year old (and too nerdy for my own good!) I really disliked the unexplained synthesis of magic and science, the complete absence of any half rational explanation for what is going on, and the failure to recognise that planets smaller than Earth would have much lower gravity (particularly as the earth is quite dense for its size). Young adults are entitled to science fiction with a little more care taken on the actual science than this. You never know, they might even learn something when reading in such cases.


The Alteration (Vintage Classics)
The Alteration (Vintage Classics)
by Kingsley Amis
Edition: Paperback
Price: £8.24

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Alternative History, 11 Feb. 2011
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This is a book self conciously in the vein of Philip Dick's classic "The Man in teh High Castle". Indeed, this book actually mention's Dick's work! But for all that it seems to be following a path set by another writer, this does not come across as a derivative work.

Hubert Anvil has a wonderful voice in a world in which Martin Luther became Pope and there was no protestant revolution. In this world, Britain is dominated by the Catholic Church, and the Pope is himself English. The church feels the gift of Hubert's voice should be preserved. Unsurprisingly Hubert comes to a different view on that issue.

The book is a clever Alternative History story (Counterfeit World's is the book's own term for this). In the book, our world is the Aletrnative History in a clever reflection of reality. The book itself tries to make some profound comment too, and teh extent to which this succeeds is a little tricky to judge. The actual scenario of Luther becoming pope in an unreformed church just seems too counter-factual for me! As did some of what the author made of all this. But with a willing suspension of disbelief, the tale hangs together well enough.

Personally I did not like the author's writing style though. It felt clipped and sometimes clunky - but in part this seems to point to the age of the work. I have not read much Kingsley Amis, and I don't find myself longing to read more.


Slog's Dad
Slog's Dad
by David Almond
Edition: Hardcover

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Excellent. If Only It Were Longer, 11 Feb. 2011
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This review is from: Slog's Dad (Hardcover)
David Almond writes some wonderful and profound stories. His curious mix of magic and realism is found again in this story, which seems to be a classic example of his style.

The book is unusual though. It is a short story but it is illustrated like a graphic novel for much of it, and these illustrations curiously add a whole new dimension to the story I would otherwise have missed.

This is a beautiful book, and not one I could just put away in the attic. It is going on my bookshelf.

My primary criticism is its so short. It is a short story, and I read it during a lunch break, with time to spare. And even then I did look at the illustrations too!

Even at the Amazon reduced price (currently 6.74) this is quite a lot of money for a small story, so unless you are also inclined to keep sucj books on display somewhere, it might be better to check this one out of a library.


The Lost Gate (Mither Mages)
The Lost Gate (Mither Mages)
by Orson Scott Card
Edition: Hardcover
Price: £19.40

9 of 11 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Another Classic Scott Card Tale, 11 Feb. 2011
Many years ago I read a short story by this author called Sand Magic. The author said that the tale was set on a world he wanted to return to, where people served various magics and in return became wizards in them.

Fast forward more years than I care to think about, and at last he has made good on his promise. The Lost Gate is a much more mature work than the original short story, and feels quite different from it. But all the elements of a classic and enjoyable Orson Scott Card book are found here. We have Card's classic teenage boy heros of course - complete with too much intelligence, and magical abilities. We also have his humour in events and dialogue, as well as the occasional earthy banter. We have some nasty characters, and some caring ones, and plenty of carefully drawn shades in between.

But most importantly here is a story that is just plain enjoyable.

Danny North has grown up in a secluded compound in the USA, filled with people descended from the Norse gods. Other compounds exist for other pantheons, but all are in decline since Loki closed all the gates to another world, Westil. As magical powers are enhanced by travel between worlds, the last 1400 years has been a period of decline for the once powerful mages. A ban on gate mages enforced with a death penalty has effectively prevented any new gates to Westil being created.

Although, in fact, there is rather more to the story than that, as you would expect from Card.

I don't think this is Card's deepest book ever. Other books of his have really got me thinking about things. This one is entertaining, if not so profound. The story is a mature and well thought through one. It may not be his best ever, but I give it five stars because anyone who likes O. S. Card's work should love this one. And if you have never read any of his books, this is as enjoyable an introduction as any of his works.

As well as plenty of classic Card stuff in this book, it also vaguely put me in mind of Percy Jackson, as well as Neil Gaimon's American Gods. It is not derivative of either of those mind.

My only criticism of the work is it left off at a point that had me wanting to read on!

I am looking forward to the next installment of the Mither Mages.


The Prince
The Prince

10 of 12 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Seminal Work in European History, 13 Jan. 2011
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This review is from: The Prince (Kindle Edition)
Many courses in modern European History begin with this work, and understandably so. It is really hard to tell sometimes whether Machiavelli was writing a manual for the amoral or a satire of the same. It has been read as both, and so much of our history seems to derive from the Machiavellian principles in this book. If nothing else, it tells us a good deal about the politics of Italy as it emerged into the modern period.

I read this as an interested reader, not to study it. Thus I have no great insights into the work, but anoyone interested in European history should probably take a look.

And this particular Kindle edition is free, which is as good as it gets.


GU10 High Power 3w 48 SMD LED Warm White = 40-50w Halogen Bulbs
GU10 High Power 3w 48 SMD LED Warm White = 40-50w Halogen Bulbs

4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Disappointing Lighting Levels, 13 Jan. 2011
I strongly feel that white LED bulbs are the future of low energy lighting. They produce a soft almost pinkish light and are extremely efficient and low power. They also look good when lit!

Unlike the more common low energy bulbs, these are compact and instantly achieve maximum brightness, rather than that extended "brown out" period as the bulb warms up.

However these bulbs were disappointing for one reason - the rated 40-50W equivalent output seems generous. I replace 8 halogen bulbs of the same rating with 8 of these and the resulty was unacceptably dark and gloomy. I ended up putting back two of the halogen bulbs just to achieve acceptable lighting levels, and if you want something really bright then these bulbs are not for you.

LED bulbs are the future, but an affordable and sufficiently bright LED bulb does not seem to be here yet.


Page: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11-20