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The Apocalypse of Saint John: A Revelation of Love and Power (Orthodox Bible Study Companion Series)
The Apocalypse of Saint John: A Revelation of Love and Power (Orthodox Bible Study Companion Series)
Price: £7.37

3.0 out of 5 stars The history of the persecution of early Christians, 29 Jan. 2015
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Surely the Book of the Apocalypse is only rivalled by the Book of Job in focusing on how terrifying is God's justice and/or 'mysterious ways'? Fr Farley includes much detail on the contemporary sufferings of St John and his brethren (barring the martyrdom of Antipas mentioned in a review above). The Apocalypse is a supremely eschatological Book; so it is a little unexpected that this exegesis treats it more as an 'end times' that finished 1700 years ago, perhaps with a few nuances of supernatural end-end flourishes. Indeed, given the treatment one could see the thousand years of peace as having passed with the reign of Christendom. To go ye olde Roman Catholic for a moment: the Cathechism of the Council of Trent says there are three necessities for the end of the world - that meaning, the Coming of Christ in Glory, not as a humble babe in a manager, but as Christus Rex in terrifying majesty. The first is the preaching of the Gospel to the whole world; the second is a general apostasy from the True Faith; the third is the coming the Antichrist. None of these had happened during the life of St John, and none of them had happend at the time of Trent. In our days, the Gospel has been preached to the whole world proper - the Cross of Christ has reached the heights, depths and breadth of the entire earth. There has been and is an appalling apostasty that has been going on since the 15th century (protestantism) and is building in intensity since Vatican II (heresy), while we watch as the eastern 'isms' of satan gain ascendency by the utter indifference or outright complicity of the west. As for number three - who can say? Fr Farley seems to put the lid on the 'beast' as Diocletian alone; he leaves little or no room for the 'number' and the poetic references having connotations or prophetic possibilities beyond. Fr Farley also stresses throughout that the very nature of being Christian is to live 'eschatologically'; the end times are these times.


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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The Good sort of Gnostic publication, 25 Jan. 2015
Unlike so many 'up to date gnostic' publications, this is unadulterated by the contemporary stream in 'gnosticism' of worldly apologetics. Layton produces the text, its context with a rare lack of bias and does not shy away from the universal apologetics of the heresiologists. He includes all the most important/elite texts/treatises on Knowlegde of Truth and Lies from the trove of early and recent discoveries that are truly pertinent to Gnostic understanding.


The Night Side of Nature (Wordsworth Myth, Legend & Folklore)
The Night Side of Nature (Wordsworth Myth, Legend & Folklore)
by Catherine Crowe
Edition: Paperback

12 of 12 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars a paranormal tour de force, 16 Oct. 2010
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'Night Side of Nature' by Catherine Crowe was first published in 1848 and enjoyed great success for 50 years but now, unfortunately, is largely forgotten - a shame since it is a paranormal tour de force. It is packed with almost 400 pages of accounts of apparitions of all varieties interspersed with arguments for and against investigators findings and opinions and is possibly the single best all around read on ghostly experiences. Catherine Crowe was also the first person to bring the word 'poltergeist' into the English language - the famous discussion is included in the Wordsworth publication which brings both volumes into one book. (A wee note - when Mrs Crowe writes of 'somnambules' she is basically referring to mediums of the day; when speaking of 'magnetism' she is referring what contemporary investigators might call 'psychic energy' or, more esoterically, 'magical sympathy'). Highly recommended.
Comment Comment (1) | Permalink | Most recent comment: Nov 12, 2010 9:31 AM GMT


Black + Decker 12v Pivot Nose Dustbuster Handheld Vacumn
Black + Decker 12v Pivot Nose Dustbuster Handheld Vacumn

10 of 10 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Better than the expensive Dysons, 8 Sept. 2010
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I bought this handheld after the Dyson I bought konked out after a couple of months. This vacuum is superior to the expensive Dyson DC31 Animal Handheld Vacuum and it's kind. Even when the trash compartment is full it is as powerful as the Dyson, and when emptied it is twice as strong. Fully charged it lasts longer than the Dyson and is much lighter to hold. The vacuumn nose is more efficient than the variety you get with the Dyson. The trash compartment is cleaner and easier to empty than the Dyson and it tucks away more tidely in it's cradle. If you are undecided whether to buy one of the latest Black and Decker handhelds or the Dyson with it's cylcone doodacky, don't bother, the Black and Decker is stronger, easier, lighter and much much cheaper.


Dyson DC31 Animal Handheld Vacuum with Dual Power Mode for Pet Owners (Latest Generation)
Dyson DC31 Animal Handheld Vacuum with Dual Power Mode for Pet Owners (Latest Generation)

38 of 42 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars not worth it, 8 Sept. 2010
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The best thing about this product is the head for picking up pet hair - it acts like one of those manual vacuum sweepers. As for the machine, it konked out after a couple of months, it's heavy for a hand held and not that powerful. The 'easy' empty trash compartment never opened easily and fully charged you're really lucky to get 10 mins out of it. After this very expensive handheld went kaput I bought a Black & Decker 12v Pivot Nose Dustbuster Handheld which is close to a £100 cheaper. The cyclone operation on the Dyson might give you an even vacuum until it suddenly stops but it is still not as powerful as the Black and Decker. On the Black & Decker, even when the trash compartment is full the suck is as good as the Dyson and when empty twice as strong. Fully charged the Black & Decker lasts longer and the trash compartment is much easier and cleaner to empty. As for the special head that picks up pet hair, you can find gagdets in two pound stores that do similar and that one accessory doesn't make up for the cost or mediocre execution of the rest of this colourful handheld. Save your money and get the Black and Decker, it's lighter, stronger, easier and cleaner to empty and tidier tucked away in it's cradle.
Comment Comment (1) | Permalink | Most recent comment: Mar 20, 2011 8:41 PM GMT


The Politics of Discipleship: Becoming Post-material Citizens
The Politics of Discipleship: Becoming Post-material Citizens
by Graham S. Ward
Edition: Paperback
Price: £22.50

4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Food for thought and action, 2 Jun. 2010
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All too often theory speaks at too great a distance from human experience and too closely to itself and about itself, a tenuous shadow rant the multiplication of which is fed by glances at the actual, yet never taking too long a look at the light of long-lived understanding - not so Professor Ward's 'Politics of Discipleship'. This offering successfully bridges the chasm between the richness of theory and the realness of living. Engagingly explored are the historical and the lived religious humanity understood as a source appropriated by the religious-like society - a thinly spread society arrogating the wealth of Judeo-Christian wisdoms to create discourses and ideologies under which the contemporary person becomes a depoliticized individual. The first part gives an overview of where we're at and why we're here. In the second part, through opening up the layers of Pauline and gospel narratives that are in themselves politically motivated, the reader is shown how and why the religious person is political and, therefore, powerful within the community of commitment. The isolated and depoliticized individual of the amorphous and secularised day-to-day is shown a new path back to personhood and the longed for definition upon which human fulfillment depends.


Marie-Therese: The Fate of Marie Antoinette's Daughter
Marie-Therese: The Fate of Marie Antoinette's Daughter
by Susan Nagel
Edition: Paperback
Price: £9.98

0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Engaging and often harrowing chronicle, 6 May 2010
The first few chapters vividly chronicle of the reign of Louis XVI and Marie Antoinette and does justice to the memory of the courageous royal couple and their children who, at the hands of revolutionaries underwent three years of 'terror' before the Reign of Terror proper even began. It is a moving and harrowing and humbling read of a terrorised family displaying a rare and royal dignity in the face of the worst human nature (and the 'Enlightenment') has to show. The intrigue and turmoil of the late 1700's and 1800's are brought to life in a manner that lingers long after the book has been put down. The author is a storyteller of great skill weaving the facts and the fleshing of them into a seamless tale of the fate of the Marie-Therese of France and answering the question hanging over the 'Dowager Queen' with regards to the legend of the 'Dark Countess'. A thorough history and a moving biography of the most 'beautiful monarchy the world has ever known' and the remarkable survivor and champion of that monarchy, 'Madame Royale'.


Symphony No. 9 In D Minor
Symphony No. 9 In D Minor

7 of 9 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars "Vanished style", 25 Mar. 2010
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"On the 16th January 1938, in the old hall of the Musikverein, Bruno Walter conducted the Vienna Philharmonic in a valedictory performance of Mahler's 9th symphony. The occasion was special in many ways. Walter was the work's dedicatee, and had given its premiere a quarter of a century before; the orchestra was Walter's own, as it had once been Mahler's; notables, including Austrian Chancellor, Kurt von Schuschnigg, were present in the hall, and F.W. Gaisberg, the pioneering record producer, was on hand with his technical assistants to commit the event to disc. Listening to this extraordinary performance today, one becomes an eavesdropper on a vanished style of orchestral playing: the players, with their studied lilt, their poised rubato and their unanimous portamenti, are speaking a shared local dialect. This is how Mahler himself made them sound, one imagines, and theirs is an artistic tradition, soon to be despoiled, that for a memorable hour or so on that winter evening was still perfectly coherent and intact." This excerpt is from an introduction by Malcolm Bowie to an edition of Freud's 'Outline of Psycholanaysis' and it prompted my purchase of this work which is well represented in Professor Bowie's remarks.


The Red Book: Liber Novus (Philemon)
The Red Book: Liber Novus (Philemon)
by C. G. Jung
Edition: Hardcover
Price: £218.50

27 of 56 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Elaborate journaling, 11 Mar. 2010
This is a fabulous example of publishing. That's the price of the book. Beautifully bound and presented, the paper stock is of the highest quality. Though a lot of what one finds in the Red Book has already been published, Liber Novus proper seems to be the Jungian bible or the completion of it - Memories, Dreams and Reflections being the other part. When compared with the likes of William Blake's illuminated writings one gets the impression that something along these lines was perhaps what Jung was attempting - Liber Novus being a simplistic example, but it is perhaps unfair to make such a comparison with the unique imaginative 'intelligence' and artisitic expression of Blake. The Red Book seems to be little more than a convoluted dissolution of Christianity by means of creative visualisation. To sum up, Jung seems be attempting to sublate the Christian gospel in the dialogues and visualisations presented in the Red Book with his new 'gospel' of 'confronting' the 'unconscious'. Reading the Red Book is like reading a disjointed fantasy novel expressed in poetic prose - fantasy not in the sense in which J.R.R. Tolkien spoke of it, but mixing in this and that element from the mundane to the mythical without regard to any cultural or historical context to make a point and thus underminding the objective integrity of such elements. Dr Jung liberally lifts biblical quotes out of their authentic context and, ignoring their meaning, places them in the mouth of his own 'muse' with a disingenuousness that characterises the Red Book as a whole. The Red Book is the crystallization of the tendency of Jung and his followers to present his internal and external life as objectively extraordinary or uniquely wonderful, as containing an objective truth that must be generally applied as a template of self understanding for those who were not Carl Jung. After having read the Red Book, I would concur with those who have said that the 'unconscious' which Jung 'confronted' was in no way 'collective' but simply Jung's own in a Freudian sense.

P.S. The responses in many reviews to the visuals of the journal are surprising. For a further understanding of the visual culture which Jung was trying to replicate and implement for his own purposes I can recommend "Illuminated Manuscripts and Their Makers" by Rowan Watson for those who are interested in expanding their knowledge with regards to the efforts exhibited in the Red Book. I can also recommend the works of Richard Noll (Jung Cult and Aryan Christ) as a further means of getting a clear grasp of the kaleidoscope of Jung's world view which the Red Book is. How many who have the Red Book will read it? Like the calligraphy and artwork, the narrative is laboured and works hard to be mystical, is disjointed as it was edited together by Jung from writings which did not necessarily share the same page when he originally penned them and is steeped in grandiose language. It is not, for this reviewer, a rewarding read. By the time one concludes Jung's 'Scrutinies' and the following commentary by the editor, it has been a tedious journey wading through a product that is so heavily the exhibition of the mind-in-his-time-and-place of Jung as to be of only fanatical interest. It is generally accepted as Jung's presentation of his journey to individuation - achieving a conscious relationship with a regenerative intelligence that is not confined to one's native socio-historical context. Keeping this in mind, consider the following:

In a 1933 interview on Berlin Radio (this at the time that his former mentor Freud had been banned and his books burned) Jung remarked:

As Hitler said recently, the Fuhrer [sic] must be able to be alone and must have the courage to go his own way. But if he doesn't know himself, how is he to lead others? That is why the true leader is always one who has the courage to be himself, and can look not only others in the eye but above all himself.

In Jung's 1934 paper The State of Psychotherapy Today he wrote:

Freud did not understand the Germanic psyche any more than did his Germanic followers. Has the formidable phenomenon of National Socialism, on which the whole world gazes with astonishment, taught them better? Where was that unparalleled tension and energy while as yet no National Socialism existed? Deep in the Germanic psyche, in a pit that is anything but a garbage-bin of unrealizable infantile wishes and unresolved family resentments...The 'Aryan' unconscious has a higher potential than the Jewish...The Jew who is something of a nomad has never yet created a cultural form of his own and as far as we can see never will, since all his instincts and talents require a more or less civilized nation to act as host for their development...The Jews have this peculiarity with women; being physically weaker, they have to aim at the chinks in the armour of their adversary.

When Dr Jung expressed these views he was nearing 60 and had had the better part of two decades in which to allow the main of his `confrontation' to mature and bear fruit. If these are an example of the `good fruit' of individuation it certainly gives one pause. Timeless, wonderful? Dr Jung is very much a man of his time and his unwieldly journal seems to be more accurately an exposition of the very `bin of unrealizable infantile wishes and unresolved family resentments' which he described in his 1934 paper.
Comment Comments (18) | Permalink | Most recent comment: Nov 12, 2015 9:30 PM GMT


Women Doing Excellently: Biblical Women and Their Successors
Women Doing Excellently: Biblical Women and Their Successors
by Paula Clifford
Edition: Paperback
Price: £8.99

2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A light on biblical women., 9 Mar. 2010
'Women Speaking Out', 'Women Taking Action', 'Poets and Prophets' - just a few of the chapter titles in this slim and but rich volume of narratives. The stories of more than twenty women of the bible from both testaments are given a careful and engaging retelling offering a more complete understanding of their place in history. The qualities of these biblical figures are compared with later women such as Catherine of Siena or Joan of Arc, Florence Nightingale, Simone Weil or Rosemary Radford Reuther to name just a few, expounding a long tradition of inspiration engendering a profound reward for the lives and times these women touch. This is absorbing and moreish reading. Highly recommended.


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