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Damaskcat (UK)
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I Let You Go
I Let You Go
Price: £3.99

5.0 out of 5 stars I Let You Go, 3 Mar. 2015
This review is from: I Let You Go (Kindle Edition)
A small boy - Jacob - is killed by a speeding car as he runs out into the road. The car doesn't stop and the boy dies within minutes. Jenna decides to leave the area and start life afresh, leaving no forwarding address. The police are determined to catch the hit and run driver and the case arouses a lot of public interest and indignation. The story is narrated partly by Jenna and we also see the police team at work and something of their private lives. Later in the book another character will have their say.

Jenna ends up in a village in South Wales and rents a tumble down cottage, gradually constructing a new life for herself. But the past refuses to die and she must deal with it in the present. I found this is a well written, atmospheric and tense story. You just know from the start that the whole story hasn't been revealed but when it does emerge it is even more shocking than at first appears.

This kept me reading long after my usual bedtime and I just had to finish it the next day. It will keep you turning the pages faster and faster as you have to know what happens and whether your favourite characters are all right. I recommend this book to anyone who has read 'The Girl on the Train'. I received a free copy of this book from NetGalley for review purposes


Rumpole and the Primrose Path (Rumpole of the Bailey Book 12)
Rumpole and the Primrose Path (Rumpole of the Bailey Book 12)
Price: £4.35

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Rumpole and the Primrose Path, 1 Mar. 2015
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This is an entertaining collection of six short stories starting with Rumpole's escape from the Primrose Path nursing home where he has been sent to recover from his heart attack brought on by a fight in court with Judge Bullingham. Rumpole fears that the body count at the Primrose Path is rather too high and decides to make his escape as speedily as possible.

The other stories are equally good with Rumpole's performance clearly not impaired by his brush with death. I especially enjoyed Rumpole Redeemed in which Rumpole sees that just because a crime appears to have been committed by a particular person with a trade mark style doesn't mean it actually was committed by that person. In this story yet another of Claude Erskine-Brown's mad attractions to unlikely women is doomed to failure.

There is something hugely endearing in Rumpole as a character I find even though he doesn't always suffer fools gladly. He frequently sees through outward appearances to the real people underneath - such as in the first story and Nurse Dotty. Rumpole is marvellous comfort reading even when you know the outcome of the story.


All Sheep Love to Sing! (A Children's Picture Book for ages 3-7)
All Sheep Love to Sing! (A Children's Picture Book for ages 3-7)
Price: £0.99

3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars All Sheep Love to Sing, 1 Mar. 2015
This is a delightful story for small children with some lovely line drawings of sheep both singing and silent. It is the Great Anwen singing contest and Emlyn can't sing but loves listening to the others. Can he find his voice in time to help the rest? The story takes about five minutes to read and would probably take about 10 minutes to read out loud to a child. I love the illustrations - altogether this is a charming story book.


Ashes to Ashes: A Gillard and Langley Mystery
Ashes to Ashes: A Gillard and Langley Mystery
by Margaret Duffy
Edition: Hardcover
Price: £19.99

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Ashes to Ashes, 27 Feb. 2015
This is the first book I've read by this author and I did enjoy it. Patrick Gillard and Ingrid Langley are a husband a wife team. He is employed by one of the more secretive branches of the Metropolitan police and has connections with the army and MI5 and MI6. Ingrid, his wife and a novelist is his part time assistant/consultant.

Their exact standing is deliberately left vague though I'm sure if you read more books in this series things become clearer. Patrick is on a sabbatical while he make sup his mind whether to opt for a rather less dangerous job. His father is vicar of the parish in which they live and he asks for Patrick's help when a parishioner comes to see him about what she thinks is a mistake with her husband's recent cremation.

This apparently simple problem - which on the face of it is probably an administrative mix-up swiftly leads to a trail of murder and mayhem and gang violence among other things. I found the two main characters interesting and the story is well narrated by Ingrid. I thought it was well written but the body count and violence was a bit too much for me though none of it is particularly graphically described.

I think I shall probably read some more in the series but people need to be aware of the violence and perhaps skip the bits which look to be a bit too much for them. Cremation ashes I can stomach but partly boiled body parts sent through the post are another matter! I received a free copy of this book from NetGalley for review purposes.


A Vintage Wedding
A Vintage Wedding
Price: £6.17

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A Vintage Wedding, 27 Feb. 2015
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This review is from: A Vintage Wedding (Kindle Edition)
I have loved some of Katie Fforde's books but others I've found a little boring. This latest one falls into the very good category and I really enjoyed reading it. There are three heroines - Beth and Rachel who have recently moved to the village and Lindy who has lived there all her life. Beth is escaping from a controlling mother and planning her sister's wedding but needs some sort of job to give her the wherewithal to live. Rachel is divorced and very OCD about her surroundings and her life and she is a freelance bookkeeper and accountant. Lindy is a single mother with two small boys and is very good at dressmaking.

None of the three have any romance in their lives but they are not too concerned about that as they want to find employment which is enjoyable and satisfying. They are brought together over the revamping of the village hall and from that and Beth's arrangement of her sister's wedding they are inspired to start Vintage Weddings - a wedding planning service. Of course - as this is a romantic comedy - there is romance in the story but there are many misunderstandings and problems before happiness can be assured for all three women.

I thoroughly enjoyed this entertaining and light hearted read. It doesn't avoid the problems in life - difficult relationships, Rachel's OCD and Lindy's problems with balancing her own life with the needs of her two boys but much of it is on the less serious side of life and romance. I enjoyed the dialogue and the way the relationships between the three women gradually grow. This is women's fiction at its sparkling best in my opinion.


Rumpole Rests His Case (Rumpole of the Bailey Book 11)
Rumpole Rests His Case (Rumpole of the Bailey Book 11)
Price: £3.95

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Rumpole Rests His Case, 26 Feb. 2015
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Horace Rumpole has an encyclopaedic memory of his old cases and inevitably he comes across people he has defended from time to time. In the first story - Rumpole and the Old Familiar Faces - two people he has come across in the past have cause to regret meeting his again. I particularly enjoyed Rumpole and the Camberwell Carrot in which Phillida Erskine-Brown finds an idol has feet of clay.

I recall reading the last story in this book when it was first published and wondering whether the last story - Rumpole Rests His Case was actually going to be his last ever appearance. I thought his final speech to the 'jury' in that story was brilliant considering he had so little hard evidence to go on.

Once again Rumpole displays his knowledge of human nature, his thirst for justice and his disinclination ever to plead guilty whatever the circumstances and never ever to prosecute. This is an entertaining collection of stories exposing the follies and foible of the great and the good and yet still making some serious points about the stupidity of the law at times. I have re-read the book many times and it loses none of its appeal.


Rumpole on Trial
Rumpole on Trial
by Sir John Mortimer
Edition: Hardcover

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Rumpole on Trial, 24 Feb. 2015
This review is from: Rumpole on Trial (Hardcover)
A collection of seven stories featuring Horace Rumpole and colleagues - Phyllida Erskine-Brown now a judge; her husband, Claude still trying to become a QC and have an extra-marital affair without being caught; Mizz Liz Probert, the radical young lawyer and 'Soapy' Sam Ballard the head of chambers. Not to speak of 'She Who Must Be Obeyed AKA Hilda Rumpole, the indefatigable Timson family who keep Rumpole in bread and butter and 'Bonny' Bernard, their solicitor who always gives Rumpole his cases.

I think this is one of the best collections of Rumpole stories though it is currently only available second hand and not available at all as an e-book. I've always been especially fond of 'Rumpole and the Eternal Triangle' which is much more serious and poignant than many Rumpole stories and which sees him emerge from the case a sadder and wiser man. I also love 'Rumpole and the Soothsayer' with its neat twist at the end.

If you can get hold of a copy of this book then I guarantee that if you love Rumpole you will not be disappointed.


The Third Rumpole Omnibus
The Third Rumpole Omnibus
by John Mortimer
Edition: Paperback
Price: £12.96

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The Third Rumpole Omnibus, 22 Feb. 2015
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This volume of short stories featuring the inimitable Horace Rumpole contains three books - Rumpole and the Age of Miracles, Rumpole a la Carte and Rumpole and the Angel of Death. Seven of the stories published here also appear in the collections - Forever Rumpole and the Collected stories of Rumpole. If you're hoping to obtain all the Rumpole stories in e-book format you will currently (2015) be disappointed as twelve of the stories in The Third Rumpole omnibus do not appear in any of the e-book editions and nor do some of the stories featured in the next volume - Rumpole on Trial.

However, whichever format you read Rumpole in he still retains his appeal as far as I'm concerned. They are real comfort reading and I have read and re-read all the stories many times and they remain as fresh and as entertaining as the first time I read them. Rumpole himself is always in search of truth and justice and on many occasions he finds them somehow. He is not above influencing proceedings himself if he can do so without getting caught - as in Rumpole and the Age of Miracles.

He is also constantly scheming and plotting to maintain the status quo in chambers when anything or anyone threatens to start the wind of change blowing for any reason. These stories are unique in that they are not wholly crime or mystery stories and they are not really comedy. Many of them are amusing but just when you've settled down to be amused and to chuckle over the marvellous descriptions of circumstances and people you come across a story which is poignant, serious and very true to life.

These are marvellous stories of life and crime and treasure my volumes of Rumpole stories for those days when nothing else will do.


The Hawk and the Dove
The Hawk and the Dove
Price: £5.03

2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars The Hawk and the Dove, 20 Feb. 2015
The stories in this collection feature the monks of a fourteenth century monastery in Yorkshire - St Alcuin. The stories are told by their mother to her daughters, one of whom finds the people in the stories dominate her thinking and day dreaming. I found them well written and entertaining even though in many ways they are morality tales. They show human nature at its best and at its worst and they show how it is possible to deal with the vicissitudes of life with dignity and humility.

As the book progresses we learn about the monks of St Alcuin. Father Peregrine - whose religious name is Columba but everyone feels his given name suits him better; his cousin, Brother Edward and a novice monk called Thomas. All have lessons to learn and the stories show how they do this. They are written in simple language so that children can understand them but they're also of relevance and interest to adults as all good stories are. I found them worthwhile reading and many of them made me smile and brought tears to my eyes. I received a free copy of this book from NetGalley for review


The Girl on the Train
The Girl on the Train
Price: £6.02

30 of 30 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The Girl on the Train, 19 Feb. 2015
I didn't think I was going to enjoy this book after I'd read the first chapter and I stopped reading for a couple of weeks but then I went back to it and started reading again and became totally engrossed in it within a few minutes. Rachel travels on the same trains every day and creates an imaginary life for a couple she sees in their house and garden. She calls them Jess and Jason and she thinks they are happy together.

Then she see something which upsets all her pre-conceived ideas and it really unsettles her. It is clear to the reader that Rachel has a problem with drinking and is never completely sober and it gradually emerges that her life is not at all what it seems to be at first.

When the young woman she has called Jess goes missing, Rachel is obsessed with following the news story and it starts to change her life. We hear from Megan (Jess) and Anna who is now married to Rachel's ex-husband and the story is told by these three woman in turn. What is the truth? What really happened on the night Megan disappeared? Who is telling the truth and who is lying? Are they all lying?

I found this book totally compulsive reading after not being able to get into it over the first few pages. I wanted to know what the truth was and I wanted to know about these three women and how they are really connected. I felt sorry for and annoyed with Rachel by turns. I wanted to tell her to get help and sort herself and her life out and her friend Cathy, with whom she lodges, seems to have the same reactions to her.

This is a well written novel and I shall definitely be watching out for more books by this author. I received a free copy of this book from NetGalley for review purposes.


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