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RDT Moderator "ogs13" (Ireland)

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Love Don't Leave Me Waiting
Love Don't Leave Me Waiting
Price: £0.99

5.0 out of 5 stars What becomes of the broken hearted?!, 6 Jan. 2016
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
Mighty tune & great vibe


Live 2004
Live 2004
Price: £5.99

45 of 46 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The High Kings of Folk return to the boards and the airwaves, 3 Aug. 2004
This review is from: Live 2004 (Audio CD)
Planxty create a sound which is completely unique - it sounds like something which echoes deep in our Celtic psyche, yet it sounds new, innovative, and exciting at the same time. Compared with some of the other fine Irish folk groups of that generation such as The Fureys, The Cheiftains, and The Dubliners, Planxty provide a similar genre of music, yet in many ways it's completely in a league of its own. The sounds of Mediterranean instruments blending with Celtic instruments and Balkans music married with music from Ireland and Britain is a concept and a sound that has worked incredibly well for Planxty and this 2004 album reaffirms that. The music sounds as fresh today as it did 30 years ago.
The world that Planxty depict is on a very different dimension from the usual landscape of the folk genre: These aren't the typical tales of the rich lording over the poor, or the love of my sweet lovely Irish cailín, or the heartbreak, loneliness and danger of emigration. Women, sailors, gypsies, blacksmiths and beggars are the heroes and villains. Ladies betray Lords with the hired-help and the lesser ranked; farm labourers defy and defeat Sergeants and their soldiers; and women scorn men who choose duty as soldier or sailor over a married life at home. Their deeds are recorded in such fine, intelligent, humorous, dramatic, and musically crafted form that it will delight you to hear this record of social history.
Planxty 2004 is a fantastic work of musicianship, with many, many highlights on this album. The THREE front men of this band (Christy Moore, Andy Irvine and Liam O'Flynn) each take their own opportunity to shine in Planxty's unique light after a gap of almost twenty years from performing together.
Christy Moore fans should check out the song Little Musgrave - close your eyes and listen as Christy completely relives each character's role depicted in the scenes of this track.
Andy Irvine's rendition of Arthur McBride is fantastically uplifting and he sings this song as if he was Arthur himself standing in front of the Sergeant scorning the forces and the Crown!
The skills of Liam Óg O'Flynn are made abundantly clear from the opening track (The Starting Gate) and O'Flynn highlights and complements so many songs and tracks of this album that it is quite difficult to rate one piece or moment above the other. My favourite instrumental piece has to be The Starting Gate however, as Liam demonstrates his skill on both the whistle and the uileann pipes and it's the perfect piece to capture the pure Planxty sound.
Dónal Lunny ties this album together with his contributions to all of the tracks. He is credited in earlier work as the composer of the immortal bridge between the song Raggle Taggle Gypsy and the instrumental piece Tabhair Dom Mo Lamh which many consider to be the highlight piece of Planxty's catalogue. Lunny is the quiet, shy, intelligent scientist of the band and he weaves this album together with beautiful bazouki riffs and melancholic guitar accompaniments.
Planxty Live 2004 is a must for any fans of folk music, Irish music, world music, different music - brilliant music!! It's proof that well written and arranged music stands the test of time and spans genres and generations. It's proof that brilliant, exciting and interesting musicians never really lose it (as long as they've got their health)! This album is not only a record of the sounds and songs of surviving folk music - it's a template for the future of folk music.


Live 2004
Live 2004
Price: £5.99

10 of 11 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The High Kings of Folk return to the boards, 29 July 2004
This review is from: Live 2004 (Audio CD)
Planxty create a sound which is completely unique - it sounds like something which echoes deep in our Celtic psyche, yet it sounds new, innovative, and exciting at the same time. Compared with some of the other fine Irish folk groups of that generation such as The Fureys, The Cheiftains, and The Dubliners, Planxty provide a similar genre of music, yet in many ways it's completely in a league of its own. The sounds of Mediterranean instruments blending with Celtic instruments and Balkans music married with music from Ireland and Britain is a concept and a sound that has worked incredibly well for Planxty and this 2004 album reaffirms that. The music sounds as fresh today as it did 30 years ago.
The world that Planxty depict, is a very different world where sailors, gypsies, blacksmiths and beggars are the heroes and villains. Ladies betray Lords with the hired-help and the lesser ranked; farm labourers defy and defeat Sergeants and their soldiers; and women scorn men who choose duty as soldier or sailor over them.
It's a fantastic work of musicianship, with many, many highlights on this album. The THREE front men of this band (Christy Moore, Andy Irvine and Liam O'Flynn) each take their own opportunity to shine in Planxty's unique light after a gap of almost twenty years from performing together.
Christy Moore fans should check out the song Little Musgrave - close your eyes and listen as Christy completely relives each character's role depicted in the scenes of this track.
Andy Irvine's rendition of Arthur McBride is fantastically uplifting and he sings this song as if he was actually standing in front of the Sergeant scorning the forces and the Crown himself!
The skills of Liam Óg O'Flynn are made abundantly clear from the opening track (The Starting Gate) and O'Flynn highlights and complements so many songs and tracks of this album that it is quite difficult to rate one piece or moment above the other. My favourite instrumental piece has to be The Starting Gate however, as Liam demonstrates his skill on both the whistle and the uileann pipes and it's the perfect piece to capture the pure Planxty sound.
Dónal Lunny ties this album together with his contributions to all of the tracks. He is credited in earlier work as the composer of the immortal bridge between the song Raggle Taggle Gypsy and the instrumental piece Tabhair Dom Mo Lamh which many consider to be the highlight piece of Planxty's catalogue. Lunny is the quiet, shy, intelligent scientist of the band and he weaves this album together with beautiful bazouki riffs and melancholic guitar accompaniments.
Planxty Live 2004 is a must for any fans of folk music, Irish music, world music, different music - brilliant music!! It's proof that well written and arranged music stands the test of time and spans genres and generations. It's proof that brilliant, exciting and interesting musicians never really lose it (as long as they've got their health) - the packaging and marketing can just get a little dated or lost! This album is not only a record of the sounds and songs of surviving folk music - it's a guide for the future of folk music.


Prosperous
Prosperous
Price: £35.74

23 of 23 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Bridging the folkin� Trans-Atlantic Gap, 18 Jun. 2004
This review is from: Prosperous (Audio CD)
Prosperous is a fine example of Christy Moore's original sound. It marks the beginnings of his fantastically successful career as a musician, both as a solo artist and as a member of some of folk's finest ensembles. Following a decision to move to England and a stint of performing and recording in Britain, Moore subsequently reneged and returned to Ireland to record with the finest folk musicians that he could assemble. Recorded in and named after a place steeped in both tradition and innovation (Prosperous, Co. Kildare), this is very reflective of both the album and the artist.

The album kick-starts with Raggle-Taggle Gypsy/Tabhair Dom Do Lamh: it's a slightly different version of from that recorded on the subsequent Planxty album. It's slightly slower and a more deliberate performance, but a fantastic version nonetheless.
The Dark Eyed Sailor is a pleasant slow song, which also contains echoes of traditional favourites Fiddlers' Green and Lakes Of Pontchartrain.
I Wish I Was In England is a good, lively, stomping folk song, credited to Christy's writing and arranging. It reflects a sentiment felt by many's an abandoned Irish lover at a time when most Irish had to seek gainful employment abroad (and cheap flights were also a distant dream!).
The album definitely contains some fine contemporary work, but it also reflects Moore's intent to reflect the parallels of traditional styles in contemporary folk.
Lock Hospital is a powerfully gentle anti-war piece and could well have been an inspiration for Eric Bogle's fine song The Green Fields of France. This is a folk song, but there are many blues songs also about the Lock Hospitals.
James Connolly is a fine lament, sung in the sean-nochas unaccompanied style. It's a song about freedom and civil rights and the powerful words, which were relevant then (back at the events of 1916 and when the song was recorded in 1972), are still relevant today.
The Hackler From Grouse Hall starts with some powerful, pounding rhythms on the bodhrán and develops into a fantastically uplifting song.
Moore also includes a very appropriate Dylan song: Tribute to Woody. This managed to pay homage to so many of his influences, as Christy was a huge fan of both Woody Guthrie and Bob Dylan. The song also name-checks many other greats (such as Lead Belly) who undoubtedly influenced Christy Moore in one way or another.
A Woody Guthrie song - The Ludlow Massacre, fittingly follows the Tribute. Again the song manages to highlight social injustices and sings the plight of the working people.
Another anti-war song follows: Letter To Syracuse. This song is a very clever piece about the basic concept of propaganda: how soldiers deny their troubles in foreign warfare to spare their families at home from anxiety.
The next two songs are currently staples of the national folk repertoire and Moore's versions are considered to be responsible for retaining these Irish classics. Spancil Hill is a tale of an emigrant's nostalgia for his hometown, the local fair, his family, friends, neighbours and lover.
Cliffs Of Dooneen depicts a typically beautiful scene from the west coast of Co. Clare. It is one of Moore's classics and this particular version demonstrates some beautiful musicianship from uileann-piper Liam O'Flynn.
The album finishes with a prodigal son type of tune. It's an English song learned from a folk singer from Manchester. This may have reflected Christy Moore's attitude to Ireland at the time because he had spent so much of his singing career around the folk scene in England.
Prosperous is the album that first brought the musicians of Planxty together (Christy Moore, Andy Irvine, Donal Lunny and Liam Óg O'Flynn). It charters the beginnings of the fine work by these four great talents along with contributions from many other fine musicians. It's a fine album which marks the homecoming of one of Ireland's most-loved performers.


Live in Dublin
Live in Dublin
Offered by Fulfillment Express
Price: £13.62

20 of 21 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Post-Planxty Troubadour, 28 May 2004
This review is from: Live in Dublin (Audio CD)
After the whirlwind experience that was Planxty, Christy Moore set off to establish his name as a serious folk artist.
Due to the influences of his American heroes, Woody Guthrie and Bob Dylan, and his Irish heroes, Luke Kelly and The Clancy Brothers, Moore gathered a repertoire of contemporary protest songs and songs for the working people (to appeal to a contemporary audience) and combined these with traditional songs of nostalgia, love and loss to highlight the parallel emotions experienced throughout all generations.
With the help of Donal Lunny on bazouki and guitar and Jimmy Faulkner on guitar, Moore created an intimate, personal, "live-in-your-living room" style of album.
The opening track 'Hey Sandy' tells of violence breaking out after US police forces intervened in a peaceful protest in an American University. The second track 'The Boys Of Barr-na-Sraide' is a nostalgic track describing the various antics of a group of men who hung around a community in Listowel, which has since been raized. The third song 'Little Mother' is a song Christy collected while gigging in Norway. 'Clyde's Bonnie Banks', 'Bogie's Bonnie Belle' and 'Black Is The Colour' are all Scottish songs. They deal with love, poverty, loss of love, death and class discrimination. Not exactly the happiest songs ever written or performed, but they demonstrate some beautifully arranged instrumentation between the three musicians and they do create a very special, intimate atmosphere. 'Pretty Boy Floyd' is a very clever Woody Guthrie song depicting a Robin Hood type character persecuted by the US authorities of the time. Of course, back then (1978) an Irish folk album would not be complete without at least one uptempo song depicting the antics of a group of drunken Irish men, so this can be found on the Barney Rush song 'The Crack Was 90 in The Isle Of Man'. The final song 'One Last Cold Kiss' is a beautiful uptempo Canadian song describing a scene between swans - quite unique! Faulkner demonstrates some fantastic guitar work on this track.
As already mentioned, this is an album of intimate songs: quiet protest, love and nostalgia are the main themes. It's not really suitable for those expecting the genre of humourous songs found on 1994's Christy Moore, Live At The Point.
However it does contain some examples of fantastic musicianship and beautiful songs and it is an excellent recording of the sort of gig that we just don't hear enough of these days!!


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