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I. Giles (Argyll, Scotland)
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Rachmaninoff: …tudes-Tableaux (Complete)
Rachmaninoff: …tudes-Tableaux (Complete)
Price: £10.33

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars This set of the complete Etudes Tableaux deserves the highest praise and recognition and collectors should not hesitate, 26 July 2016
Zlata Chochieva may be relatively unknown to disc collectors in parts of the world but she has certainly made her mark internationally as both a concert pianist and also as a competitor having won no less than ten such international competitions. She brings great intensity to her playing which is remarkably powerful both physically and emotionally as well as demonstrating considerable sensitivity.

All of this is underpinned with an essentially lyrical rather than percussive delivery and the whole adds up to a formidable package when taking into account her sheer technical mastery. These features combine or conspire to make her a naturally sympathetic performer of Rachmaninov’s music including these works written before Rachmaninov left Russia for America.

As can be deduced from the title ‘Tableaux,’ many of these pieces can be linked or associated with a range of images. These images are not specific in the way that links the story of the Apprentice’s Apprentice to the music though. More typically they seek to create a mood or sensation that has an emotional tie to an idea rather than a clear-cut pictorial image. This is achieved by textural means utilising the full expressive range of the piano as the carrying medium.

Rachmaninov, with his vast technical resources and emotional imagination was a composer ideally suited to such a transfer of emotional imagery. The short Red Riding-Hood imagery of Op. 33/6 is unusually specific in its imagery. The use of over-lapping bell-like chimes is a favourite compositional device but more often the pieces rely upon the emotional power of textural composition underpinned by thematic motifs that link rather than develop (in the ways that Beethoven would follow for example).

Zlata Chochieva, as described in general terms in the opening two paragraphs above, is perfectly suited to such music and she delivers the two sets of etudes in a way that cannot fail to satisfy the most critical of listeners. Like Ashkenazy, Giltburg, Lugansky, Paterson-Olenich, Ovchinnikov and Romanovsky whose traversals have all been referred to in the process of assessing this disc, Chochieva favours the darker side of the tonal spectrum. This could almost be deduced to be a specifically Russian characteristic when performing such emotional imagery. It is certainly largely absent in the otherwise fine set by Howard Shelley. The same can be said of the partial traversals by Richter who was able to transmit extraordinary sensations of desolation as well as splendour in his limited selections.

The recording quality of this disc is excellent and delivers believable piano sound in believable acoustics and within a believable soundstage.

This set of the complete Etudes Tableaux deserves the highest praise and recognition and collectors should not hesitate in adding it to their collections.


Rachmaninov: Piano Sonata No. 1 & Chopin
Rachmaninov: Piano Sonata No. 1 & Chopin
Price: £9.73

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars This is a very powerful pair of recordings that deserve to be considered with the very best of these impressive early works, 26 July 2016
This pair of early works by Rachmaninov make an unusual and very demanding challenge, both musically and technically, for the superb musical and technical skills of the young rising Russian star, Zlata Chochieva. Curiously, the informative sleeve notes suggest that neither work is completely deserving of approbation having the disadvantages of length relative to content, an accompanying tendency for a lack of compositional focus and, in the case of the sonata, a lack of memorable themes for the listener or performer to latch on to.

These areas of doubt are demonstrably demolished by Chochieva who has clearly found the works to be rewarding of copious application and who delivers recordings that will amply reward purchasers. In these ways she joins other young players of outstanding talent in the sonata including Lugansky, Romanovsky and Yuri Paterson-Olenich and she joins Scherbakov and Sudbin in the Variations. One must also give due credit to Howard Shelley in both works whose pioneering work in his complete Rachmaninov series should not be underestimated even if it now seems emotionally more reserved at times than these more recent examples.

Zlata Chochieva may be relatively unknown to disc collectors in parts of the world but she has certainly made her mark internationally as both a concert pianist and also as a competitor having won no less than ten such international competitions. She brings great intensity to her playing which is remarkably powerful both physically and emotionally as well as demonstrating considerable sensitivity. All of this is underpinned with an essentially lyrical rather than percussive delivery and the whole adds up to a formidable package when taking into account her sheer technical mastery.

All of this makes her a naturally sympathetic performer of Rachmaninov’s music including these early works. Rachmaninov, as is well known, was plagued by self-doubt through much of his life and could be tempted by revision especially in works that he later felt might outstay an audience’s interest. He was known to miss out sections of works when performing ‘live’ if he felt audience interest waning. This applies to the Chopin Variations especially and he never played the first sonata after completing his second – a work that he reduced to questionable effect and which has since been subject to many personal revisions by performers wishing to combine the best of several worlds.

Zlata Chochieva plays both of these works as originally written and also plays them with formidable skill and persuasion. Heard in performances such as these there seems little reason to wish for any form of reduction. In the case of the first sonata it has become fashionable to focus on the tenuous link of the work to ideas of Faust. These connections result from the composer’s own later thoughts that the underlying nature of the work could be likened to Faust connotations. He thought that this might help audiences get to grips with the long work which he feared might prove difficult to grasp without some pictorial guide. There is certainly a lack of the ‘big tune’ or clear use of musical motifs but that is to miss the point. This sonata, like so much of the composer’s work, is largely focussed upon textural matters that take the listener on frequently abstract textural journeys. The scale of the piece is what makes it seem different to shorter works such as many of the Preludes or even the Etudes Tableaux. An open mind to that range of consideration is all that is needed to enjoy this sonata.

This is a very powerful pair of recordings that deserve to be considered with the very best of these impressive early works. Chochieva makes the case that these are not flawed works and that any flaw lies more in the listener’s comprehension.

The recording quality is that of an excellently believable piano sound set in a believable acoustic.


Rachmaninoff: Suites Op.5/ 17 [Works For 2 Pianos] [Nikolai Petrov, Alexander Ghindin] [Piano Classics: PCL0058]
Rachmaninoff: Suites Op.5/ 17 [Works For 2 Pianos] [Nikolai Petrov, Alexander Ghindin] [Piano Classics: PCL0058]
Price: £14.46

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A very fine example of a pair of perfectly tuned performers delivering perfectly tuned, thought-provoking performances, 25 July 2016
This group of recordings was recorded ‘live’ in 2001 at the Svetlanov Hall in Moscow shortly before the untimely death of Nikolai Petrov. The recording itself, despite being a genuinely ‘live’ occasion, gives no cause for concern either as a sound recording of two pianos or in terms of audience noise during the performances.

In considering the musical content as performances this review has been written bearing in mind references to other recordings by Argerich and Friere (separate performances on CD and DVD), Ashkenazy and Previn, Alexeev and Demidenko and Shelley and MacNamara. Only the Ashkenazy and Shelley recordings provide alternatives for all three works.

The CD under consideration by Petrov and Ghindin makes a striking impression from the very start with a notably more sensitive approach than any of the others. This is sustained throughout the initial two movements of the first Suite and is a notable feature throughout the whole disc. This does not imply introverted or introspect performances or ones lacking in drama and / or excitement.

There are plenty of examples of drama but not generally of the sort of excitement generated by racing speeds. The drama is created by bringing out dramatically ‘telling’ details which are musically significant and which, frequently, one hears seemingly for the first time. Thus another feature of the performances is the choice of alternate timbres and textures emanating from very precise control over chording and the emphasis within the chording and structures. This is especially true of the middle and last movements of the Symphonic Dances.

The Symphonic Dances are NOT arrangements of the orchestral Symphonic Dances but rather an alternative composition that only shares the same path as if an alternative arrangement rather than an alternative creation. Frequently, in the hands of skilled performers such as these and others, one hears details glossed over in the orchestral Dances, there being so much orchestral clothing to mask the underlying musical structures. One goes to the orchestral Dances for orchestral sounds and one goes to the piano Dances for the underlying musical drama in its purest form.

Although one should not think of movement timings as crucial evidence it is a factor that Petrov and Ghindin take longer than most over most of the eleven movements on this disc. This runs counter to expectation given the ‘live’ nature of the event where one would expect adrenalin to contribute speed. Only Ashkenazy and Previn come near but the effect in their case is that of increased romanticism which is not unexpected given their characters as musicians. Their slower sections are emotionally warmer and their faster sections are more extrovertly exciting – a thrilling combination. Petrov and Ghindin, on the other hand, deliver performances that dig deep, are sensitive and dramatic and are consequently deeply satisfying and rewarding.

This amounts to a very fine example of a pair of perfectly tuned performers delivering perfectly tuned, thought-provoking performances. It makes this disc especially collectable for collectors and lovers of Rachmaninov’s major works for two pianos.


Sofya Gulyak - Piano [Champs Hill Records: CHRCD064]
Sofya Gulyak - Piano [Champs Hill Records: CHRCD064]
Price: £14.18

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars This is a very impressive disc, is well recorded and well-worth investigating by anyone interested in the program., 21 July 2016
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Sofya Gulyak is a Russian pianist from Kazan who will be familiar to many followers of competition success as the first woman to win the coveted Leeds Piano Competition in 2009 at the age of 30. Since then she has embarked upon a successful international career. This disc provides a good indication as to what to expect.

There are two heavyweight and important major works by Rachmaninov and Prokofiev on the disc and these take up most of the playing time. The disc opens with a selection of music by Medtner who was contemporary with, and a friend of, Rachmaninov.

The Prokofiev Sonata 6 forms the first of the so-called ‘war sonatas’ of the composer and was premiered by the composer in 1940. The first movement is a no-compromising statement of a somewhat gritty nature. This is not entirely true of the rest of the work and in this performance one is made aware of the lyrical nature of the third movement, the good humour of the second movement and the Cinderella-like scurrying passages (where the prince is searching for the owner of the slipper) with which the final movement commences. All of this is achieved by Gulyak’s incisive and complete control of rhythm which is applied to both aggressive and to delicate textures. This taught rhythmical control coupled with a wide range of touch is a potent combination and delivers an engrossing, and possibly original, view of the sonata – one that can be testing of the listener. Other fine performances that spring to mind are those by Gavrylyuk (DVD), Kissin, Lugansky and the recent Giltburg. This Gulyak performance deserves equal consideration.

The same range of control and touch is apparent throughout the Corelli variations by Rachmaninov. This very late work by the composer is an undoubted masterwork and utterly rewarding in the hands of pianists who have the technical and musical skills to fully explore its numerous facets. This Gulyak certainly does and her performance can readily take its place among the finest including recordings by Ashkenazy, Lugansky, Pletnev, Rodriguez and Romanovsky all of whom have made memorable statements. As with all masterworks there is always room for yet more variants of quality and this is another one.

The opening pieces by Medtner are arguably not works of the exalted level of either the Prokofiev or the Rachmaninov. Nevertheless he has his followers, particularly among compatriots, and Gulyak is one of those. Bearing in mind her musical talents it would be difficult to imagine more committed and persuasive accounts of the 4 Folk Tales (think Grimm’s tales or Dvorak’s late tone poems to get a flavour of the mood) or the short but punchy and aptly named Tragic Sonata. The timings for these Medtner works are wrongly listed in the otherwise very informative booklet where their sequence is one out. The rest of the disc is correctly listed.

This is a very impressive disc, is well recorded and well-worth investigating by anyone interested in the program.


Mendelssohn; Lieder Ohne Worte
Mendelssohn; Lieder Ohne Worte
Price: £15.40

2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars This pair of discs by Szokolay is a worthy complementary companion to Barenboim’s set., 20 July 2016
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This pair of discs recorded in 2012 has, for the purposes of this review, been largely compared with the renowned 1973 set by Barenboim. That set has been a library member for many of those intervening years. Additionally reference has been made to the more recent partial coverage by Knauer recorded in 2008.

The opening program notes of the Barenboim unintentionally set the scene for such comparison as follows: ‘No 19th century composer exceeded Mendelssohn in respect for Classical tradition ….. and ordered modes of expression. Yet he, too, was aware of Romantic winds of change that were turning all around him to the short character piece, often carrying titles …. as a means of encapsulating the mood of the moment.’

The 49 pieces compromising the complete Songs are in eight groups of six compositions spanning the period from Op 19 to Op 102 and ending with one Song without an opus number. By being fairly evenly spaced they provide a glimpse into the way Mendelssohn developed as a composer during his short life. A slight oddity of this set of pieces presented by Szokolay is that, although each opus number is presented in numerical order, the individual pieces within that order do not follow the numerical order within each opus number. This can only be a deliberate decision but is not explained although it runs contrary to the detailed sleeve notes which state that ‘each one (piece) was intended (by the composer) to be heard in its place in its particular sequence.’

Throughout Barenboim’s justly appreciated and admired survey of these pieces, one is aware of the Classical tradition, of Mendelssohn’s love of cascading showers of filigree finger-work. Tempi are forward-moving and there is much use of internal rubato but never at the expense of control over Classical textures. The effect is one of glittering beauty without the need for emotional overlay. Knauer, in his superb partial selection, takes a more overtly Romantic lyrical view of the music and it is a great shame that his survey remains only partial.

In the pair of discs by Balazs Szokolay, an experienced Hungarian concert pianist with an international reputation, the move towards the Romantic period is more pronounced. The tempi, although not strict, are in general terms, rather steadier. This suits his emphasis upon the purely lyrical nature of his playing rather than his equal accuracy of those pervading scale-like figurations that one cannot miss in Barenboim’s set. In this case there is a relatively enhanced awareness of the flow of Mendelssohn’s Romantically charged melodic lines and it is easy to luxuriate in an aura of warm Romanticism as one progresses through the set.

These differences between the Barenboim and the Szokolay sets are further emphasised by the nature of their recordings. Barenboim’s, being nearly 40 years older does not have the warmth and fullness of tone found in this newer recording, even in its latest re-mastered presentation. Additionally the newer recording is presented at a notably higher decibel level which further emphasises that difference. A reduction of about 5dB of playback level provides for a better listening experience and a better ‘period’ awareness.

In summary, Barenboim seems to see these works as a continuation of the Classical period whereas Szokolay seems to see them as leading to the fuller Romantic world of Schumann. Both are equally valid approaches and will give equal levels of reward for listeners. Collectors would benefit by owning both.

This pair of discs by Szokolay is a worthy complementary companion to Barenboim’s set even though it does not contain his generous extra items.


Respighi: Roman Trilogy (Fontane Di Roma/ Pini Di Roma/ Feste Romane)
Respighi: Roman Trilogy (Fontane Di Roma/ Pini Di Roma/ Feste Romane)
Price: £13.18

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars This disc offers an impressive combination of readings and recordings capable of comparison with the best., 17 July 2016
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This disc was recorded in 2008 and released in 2010. It is offered as a hybrid SACD with playing options for playback in full 5.0 surround sound via a SACD player or stereo in a conventional CD player. This review is based on the SACD surround option.

The playback sequence is in the order of composition which is the Fountains followed by the Pines and concluding with the Festivals. By offering all three sets of four Roman tone poems in this way it is easy for listeners to compare and to appreciate the way that Respighi developed these compositions into ever more complex structures with overlapping textures.

The final movement of the Festivals with its overlapping and deliberately cacophonous array of sounds representing the Epiphany celebrations in the Piazza Navona is the ultimate of such effects with numerous motives and snatches vying for attention in quick succession and even simultaneously. This is a far compositional cry from the earlier highly controlled and remorseless procession of the ancient Roman army or the quiet song of the nightingale in the Pines. The scenes in the Fountains are equally well defined one by one. All of this music, of course, leads straight to the ideas taken up by later generations of film score composers.

The Sao Paulo orchestra has attained enviable musical and technical standards since its creation over the last 60 years or so and particularly under the guidance of John Neschling as on this recording and its chief conductor from 1997 to 2009. They have nothing fear from the considerable demands of these scores which are performed with skill and clarity. The Strauss Alpine Symphony under Shipway is another such example of superb precision both individually and corporately.

The readings themselves make the fullest possible advantage of exploring and responding to the considerable range of melodic and textural facilities that Respighi employs with his extensive instrumental demands. Although the overall size of the orchestra is very large, generally this size is more often used for small-scale variety rather than large-scale bombardment. In this way there is some similarity with the works of Richard Strauss, another composer who used large orchestras for the same sort of musical effects.

These readings, with their awareness of small-scale musical and textural details are ideal vehicles for sensitive use of surround sound recording techniques. In none of these ways does this disc disappoint and there will be many instances where listeners will have their musical ears tickled. The bigger moments are also well delivered, and admirers of the reputable SACD / CD Reiner recordings from nearly 60 years ago will be relieved to hear that Neschling does not undermine the concluding march of the approaching legions at the end of the Pines by adopting too fast a pace. Curiously, in order to match the clarity of the older Reiner recording it is necessary to replay this newer one at a higher output level. Provided that that is done the newer recording offers clarity as well as depth and width of sound stage. The ambience is very natural.

This disc offers an impressive combination of readings and recordings capable of comparison with the best.


Schumann: Etudes Symphoniques Op.13, Pia
Schumann: Etudes Symphoniques Op.13, Pia
Price: £9.18

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A tempting and impressive set of recordings capturing an international pianist at the cusp of his career on sparkling form, 16 July 2016
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This disc was recorded by Challenge Classics in 1994 at a time when Lugansky was a young man of just 21-2 years caught at the cusp of his ensuing rise to prominence as an international soloist. Later, in the same year, he won the 10th Tchaikovsky piano Competition.

The three pieces recorded here are all the work of a young composer of not dissimilar age to that of Lugansky at the time of recording. Lugansky plays all three pieces in a markedly up-beat in terms of general mood and with a style that could best be described as crisp with clearly defined articulation and displaying an inherent energy. There is very little of the musing introspection to be found in his Rachmaninov disc of 1983 and rather more of the extrovert.

This whole approach is more consistent with the compositions heard here. Schumann was a forthright composer as he was also forthright in his views and public expressions of belief in his journalistic writings. He was searching for another way of writing music which did not continue the path followed by Beethoven and which he considered impossible to develop further or to emulate.

The Symphonic Etudes, the first Sonata and the virtuosic Toccata all have an energy that relates to the energy of a young and vibrant personality and Lugansky captures that side of Schumann to perfection. This disc therefore stands as a fully justified statement of music making that is in accord with the compositions.

There are other ways of approaching the Symphonic Etudes and the Sonata of course. Both Pollini and Alexeev seek and find more nuances of poetic expression in their CDs of the Etudes as does Schiff on his DVD version. A more recent example could be Romanovsky on a fine Decca offering. Kissin delivers an Etudes and a sonata performance that suggests a composer of a more weighty turn of mind. None of these should claim to be the definitive and only way of performing these works although Pollini’s Etudes could be described as close.

The actual quality of these Lugansky recordings, as with the companion Rachmaninov disc, are impressively realistic and in good modern range and depth. Collectors would be rewarded by purchasing this example of the young Lugansky in markedly energetic mood as an alternative to weightier concepts. The Toccata could even be discussed in the same breath as Richter’s historic account and that certainly says something!

This is a tempting and impressive set of recordings capturing an international pianist at the cusp of his career on sparkling form.


Rachmaninoff: Piano Sonata 2,  Corelli Variations
Rachmaninoff: Piano Sonata 2, Corelli Variations
Price: £10.12

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A tempting and impressive set of recordings capturing an international pianist fully formed at the cusp of his career., 16 July 2016
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
This disc was recorded by Challenge Classics in 1993 at a time when Lugansky was a young man of just 21 years caught at the cusp of his ensuing rise to prominence as an international soloist. The following year, in 1994, he won the 10th Tchaikovsky piano Competition.

Since then Lugansky has re-recorded much of this disc with the Variations being part of his Rachmaninov concerto and variations set for Warner. That set has been much admired and thought by many collectors and magazine reviewers as being a leading contender in a very competitive field. His later disc coupling the two sonatas has received similar approbation and, inevitably, interest must centre on any major differences between these earlier recordings and the later versions.

This has been an interesting set of comparisons as the differences are by no means consistent. Very often, when an artist revisits works recorded in earlier days the later version can be perceived as more thoughtful or perceptive but almost always at the cost of spontaneity. This is absolutely not true of these two sets of recordings. Instead one is left with the impression of complementary different but also similar versions where the final conclusion must recognise the spontaneity of creative performance in both versions.

One, perhaps more significant point, is the disparity between Lugansky's opposing recordings of the sonata. As will be well known by collectors, this sonata exists in three official versions plus many others of a personal performer's nature. Rachmaninov decided that the first published version was too long and thematically complex and he shortened and clarified the sonata in the 1931 revision. This was not an entirely approved of version and Horowitz created a third version, sanctioned by the composer, that married elements of the two published versions. Since then there have been numerous other similar attempts to create a performing edition bringing together elements of all the previous versions. Lugansky has also made his own version and that is the one found on his later disc. This earlier version probably predates the pianist's own version and is almost certainly the 1931 version although detailed comparisons have not been made.

In general these earlier versions are fractionally more inclined to 'muse' inwardly in the more reflective sections while at the opposite end of the spectrum the more extrovert sections display a more marked virtuosic dispatch with some breathtaking finger-work. The touch is just a fraction lighter, maybe more youthful as an impression. It would be wrong though, to make too much of this or to suggest that the later versions are more mature or that the earlier versions are more youthful. That is because these characteristics are equally divided between the two sets with both elements discernible in both. What we have here are equally valid and impressive versions of the same repertoire with both being by the same artist but as if caught on slightly different occasions during the same period of time.

The quality of the recordings are impressively realistic and in good modern range and depth. Collectors would be rewarded by purchasing both this disc and the alternative later recordings as they are all competitively priced.

This is a tempting and impressive set of recordings capturing an international pianist fully formed at the cusp of his career.


Atacama Evoque Eco 60-40 SE - Natural Bamboo - 3 Shelf
Atacama Evoque Eco 60-40 SE - Natural Bamboo - 3 Shelf
Offered by The Plasma Centre
Price: £524.97

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars This combination offers the audio enthusiast the ideal match of hi-fi requirements and good looking furniture aesthetics., 11 July 2016
This range of shelving designed to support substantial audio equipment is a development of the previous range of Europa hi-fi base module and shelving. The previous heavy duty glass shelving has been replaced with substantial bamboo shelving supported by the same system of upright posts, gel pads, cones and spike shoes.

The previous design was highly effective as attractive and functional hi-fi shelving with support, acoustic isolation and damping system built in. However, its glass and metal presentation could be described as aesthetically minimalist by current 'furnishing' standards so the replacement of the glass shelving with extremely strong bamboo shelving is a marked aesthetic advance. The supporting structures are practically the same as before so the hi-fi requirements of acoustic isolation and damping are not compromised while at the same time being more in tune with the concept of pieces of furniture.

The construction of the bamboo shelving itself is in the form of overlapping lengths of bamboo following the pattern of overlapping bricks found in normal house construction. This gives the whole structure great strength and is capable of supporting equipment of considerable weight. Each shelf is machined and finished to a high standard as one would expect from good quality furniture.

As one who possesses both the previous Equinox and Europa designs as well as the replacement Evoque 40-60 system it is possible to judge the two ranges and to confirm that the previously admirable hi-fi requirements are not compromised and are fully continued with this attractive bamboo shelving.

This combination offers the audio enthusiast the ideal match of hi-fi requirements and good looking furniture aesthetics.


Atacama Evoque Eco Medium Bamboo Hifi Stand - 3 Tier
Atacama Evoque Eco Medium Bamboo Hifi Stand - 3 Tier
Offered by Chase AV Direct
Price: £504.99

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars This combination offers the audio enthusiast the ideal match of hi-fi requirements and good looking furniture aesthetics., 11 July 2016
This range of shelving designed to support substantial audio equipment is a development of the previous range of Europa hi-fi base module and shelving. The previous heavy duty glass shelving has been replaced with substantial bamboo shelving supported by the same system of upright posts, gel pads, cones and spike shoes.

The previous design was highly effective as attractive and functional hi-fi shelving with support, acoustic isolation and damping system built in. However, its glass and metal presentation could be described as aesthetically minimalist by current 'furnishing' standards so the replacement of the glass shelving with extremely strong bamboo shelving is a marked aesthetic advance. The supporting structures are practically the same as before so the hi-fi requirements of acoustic isolation and damping are not compromised while at the same time being more in tune with the concept of pieces of furniture.

The construction of the bamboo shelving itself is in the form of overlapping lengths of bamboo following the pattern of overlapping bricks found in normal house construction. This gives the whole structure great strength and is capable of supporting equipment of considerable weight. Each shelf is machined and finished to a high standard as one would expect from good quality furniture.

As one who possesses both the previous Equinox and Europa designs as well as the replacement Evoque 40-60 system it is possible to judge the two ranges and to confirm that the previously admirable hi-fi requirements are not compromised and are fully continued with this attractive bamboo shelving.

This combination offers the audio enthusiast the ideal match of hi-fi requirements and good looking furniture aesthetics.


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