Learn more Shop now Learn more Shop now Shop now Shop now Shop now Shop now Learn More Shop now Shop now Learn more Shop Fire Shop Kindle Amazon Music Unlimited for Family Shop now Fitbit
Profile for Susannah B (SusieB) > Reviews

Personal Profile

Content by Susannah B (Su...
Top Reviewer Ranking: 49
Helpful Votes: 8480

Learn more about Your Profile.

Reviews Written by
Susannah B (SusieB)
(TOP 50 REVIEWER)   

Show:  
Page: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11-20
pixel
The Age of Innocence
The Age of Innocence
Price: £0.49

5.0 out of 5 stars A Beautifully Written and Perceptively Observed Story, 27 Jun. 2017
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
In Edith Wharton's twelfth novel 'The Age of Innocence', we meet Archer Newland, a young lawyer living in New York in the 1870s, who has been looking forward to his marriage to the naive and lovely May Welland, a society beauty whose sheltered upbringing and training has turned her into a young woman destined to become the perfect wife and mother. However, despite Archer's appreciation of May's quiet charms, he soon begins to find her strict adherence to society's rules and conventions and her unadventurous spirit rather frustrating and limiting - especially when he meets her cousin, the Countess Ellen Olenska, an exotic and intriguing woman, who has scandalously left her husband in Europe and whose independent outlook on life forces Archer to question the narrow confines of his. Before long, Archer has fallen in love with Ellen, but nevertheless goes ahead with the wedding; however each time he meets the Countess Olenska, he finds it difficult to control his feelings, especially as Ellen shows that she is attracted to him as much as he is to her. Does Archer manage to suppress his deep desire for Ellen and dutifully stand by his marriage vows, or does he decide to disregard the rules of society and leave his conventional life behind him? Obviously I must leave that for those who have yet to read the book to learn for themselves.

In this novel, which was first published in 1920 and winner of the Pulitzer Prize in 1921, Edith Wharton deftly paints a convincing portrait of upper-class New York society of the 1870s with its rigid code of conduct and its many hypocrisies, and the narrative is littered with Ms Wharton's perceptive observations of the society in which she grew up. Her characters are believable creations whose personalities develop through the course of the story and although, at the outset of the novel we might find ourselves sympathizing with May in her innocence, we soon begin to see that she is not as innocent or guileless as she initially seems and that when she needs to be she can be designing and manipulative - whilst conversely, we see the apparently less moralistic Ellen Olenska behaving in more admirable manner than her detractors might suppose she would - but I cannot explain further without revealing spoilers. All in all, I found this a beautifully written and very engaging read and, like the author's 'The House of Mirth', is one that I would be happy to revisit in the future.

5 Stars.


Sway
Sway
by Kim Hargreaves
Edition: Paperback

5.0 out of 5 stars Attractive Designs, 25 Jun. 2017
This review is from: Sway (Paperback)
Having fairly recently reviewed Kim Hargreaves' 'Crush' - which is the first in her new series of knitting books 'KIM' - I was surprised to see another new book out so soon, but 'Sway' is so full of attractive new designs, that I was swayed (sorry) into buying it. My favourites are 'Ahoy' a crocheted striped sweater with a lovely boat-shaped neckband; 'Bo' a gorgeous long-sleeved cropped sweater with a scalloped shaped hem; and 'Sunshine' a lacy cardigan, knitted - as are the previous two designs mentioned - in Rowan's Handknit Cotton. I'm also very taken with 'Tally' a lovely cropped lacy cardigan in Rowan's Summerlite 4ply and there are at least two more designs that I would very much like to knit. I haven't had chance to make a start on any of these yet (and I have picked out more than one design from the aforementioned 'Crush' - so goodness knows how I am going to find the time to knit and wear all these garments), but I have been knitting from Kim's books for many years (including the Rowan Knitting books where Kim was one of the main designers before she set up on her own) and I have always been pleased with the finished results. If you want to see all of the patterns contained in this book in detail, then do visit Kim's website or try English Yarns, who have an easily navigable website where you'll be able to see all of the patterns and the materials required to knit the designs. John Lewis now also sell quite a wide range of Rowan Yarns online.

5 Stars.


Great Expectations
Great Expectations
Offered by Audible Ltd

4.0 out of 5 stars Great Expectations, 23 Jun. 2017
Verified Purchase(What is this?)
In Charles Dickens' 'Great Expectations' we meet the young Philip Pirrip (Pip) who lives on the Kent marshes with his much-older and domineering sister - who, fortunately for Pip, is married to the kindly Joe Gargery, a blacksmith, whose sympathy and kindness go some way to make up for the harshness Pip experiences from Mrs Gargery. When out on the marshes one bleak, late afternoon, Pip encounters an escaped convict, Abel Magwitch, who scares the terrified boy into helping him. When Pip does as he has been bidden, he unwittingly earns the heartfelt gratitude of Magwitch, despite the convict soon being recaptured. As time passes, Pip puts the unpleasant experience behind him, and when he is summoned to Satis House, the home of Miss Havisham, a rich, eccentric spinster, and becomes smitten with her beautiful, but unfeeling adopted daughter, Estella, he has more than enough to occupy his mind - especially as the lovely Estella only condescends to speak to him so that she can enjoy tormenting him. As time passes, Pip falls deeply in love with Estella and when he suddenly discovers that he has an unknown benefactor and he is to be educated to become a gentleman, Pip wonders whether his mystery benefactor is Miss Havisham and whether he is being groomed as a husband for Estella. But is it as simple as that? No, of course not, however I shall leave the remainder of the story for those who have yet to read it to learn for themselves, and there is a huge amount more to discover in this coming-of-age story, with its themes of ambition and desire and of social status and morals, than I have revealed in this review.

I first read this book many years ago and have wanted to reread it for some time - however, I find it difficult to justify taking the time out to reread novels when I have so many unread books on my shelves and I decided to download the audio version instead, opting for the BBC dramatised version which I planned to listen to while travelling. Of course, as this download is an abridgement, there are some aspects of the original version that have been omitted, but the main parts of the story are all present and this is a very good production in which the cast members (including Douglas Hodge, Geraldine McEwan and Jim Carter) play their parts with aplomb - there are also some short pieces of atmospheric music played at intervals during the story which adds to the listening experience. As I have mentioned before in reviews of mine for abridged versions, I do feel that if a book's worth reading then it's worth reading in its entirety, and if you do have the time I would recommend the unabridged version - however, if you have read it before and just want to revisit the story, or if you'd rather listen to a dramatisation, then this enjoyable BBC production is a very good one to opt for.

4 Stars.


Another Time, Another Place
Another Time, Another Place
by Jessie Kesson
Edition: Paperback

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Another Time, Another Place, 20 Jun. 2017
Set in a remote village in the north-east of Scotland in the summer of 1944, Jessie Kesson's slim novel 'Another Time, Another Place' focuses on a young (unnamed) woman, the wife of a farm worker, whose life is suddenly changed by the arrival of three Italian prisoners of war who are billeted to the bothy that adjoins her crofter's cottage. The young woman's husband is a quiet, thoughtful and dependable man and he and the young woman work very hard to earn enough money to support themselves and to put by as much as they can for a rainy day. But the young woman, who doesn't really fit in with the other farm workers' wives, finds her life mundane and limiting and when the three Italian men arrive and bring with them a seductive glimpse of a whole other world beyond the confines of her own narrow existence, she finds herself behaving in a manner that inevitably has consequences which will have a significant impact on her life.

Although written with an economy of language, the author's evocation of crofting life and of the backbreaking work involved with earning enough money to keep the wolf from the door, is very well done, as is her portrayal of the villagers' reluctance to tolerate the presence of the Italian prisoners of war - especially Elspeth, a no-longer young woman, whose fiancé has been reported as 'missing' in Italy. The narrative is also interspersed with a selection of poetry, rhymes and Scottish folk songs - which I actually found a little distracting, but I do realize that other readers may find this aspect of the book adds to its Celtic appeal. In some ways this is an evocative tale of a way of life that has now disappeared, but although I found parts of the story to be pertinent and perceptively observed, I didn't become as involved with the characters or their situations as much as I would have hoped, and I wasn't convinced that the young woman would have behaved - or have had the opportunity to behave - in quite the way she did (I can't explain further without revealing spoilers). That said, I can see why others have found this an enjoyable read, and despite my not deriving as much from this novel as I would have liked, I am glad to have read it.

3 Stars.


Fasting and Feasting: The Life of Visionary Food Writer Patience Gray
Fasting and Feasting: The Life of Visionary Food Writer Patience Gray
by Adam Federman
Edition: Hardcover
Price: £20.00

4.0 out of 5 stars Fasting and Feasting, 19 Jun. 2017
Although Patience Gray is not as well known as the food writers Elizabeth David, Jane Grigson or Julia Child, her book 'Plats du Jour' (co-written with Primrose Boyd and illustrated by David Gentleman) was a bestseller in its time, and her renowned 'Honey from a Weed', as her biographer Adam Federman tells us in his introduction, is part recipe book, part travelogue and part memoir, and "one of the most important and best-loved cookery books of the twentieth century". Mr Federman goes on to explain that one of the reasons for Patience Gray being so little known beyond a small circle of food writers and critics, may have been because she lived for over thirty years in a remote corner of southern Italy, without electricity, telephone, a refrigerator or television, and where she grew her own food and gathered wild plants and fungi.

In this sympathetic biography, Mr Federman (an American environmental journalist who discovered a copy of 'Honey from a Weed' on his parents' bookshelf and was swept away by its originality and its vivid descriptions) follows Patience Gray's life from her birth in Surrey in 1917 to her death in Italy in 2005, and where we learn of her meeting the married Thomas Gray in 1939 and of the births of their three children; of the breakdown of their relationship (which later Patience described as "pure folly"); of Patience leaving Thomas whilst she was pregnant with their third child (who sadly died in infancy); of her life as a single parent; of her work at the Royal College of Art; of her work as a freelance journalist; and of her collaboration with Primrose Boyd and the publication of 'Plats du Jour'. We also read of Patience designing textiles for Edinburgh Weavers and wallpapers for Wallpapers Manufacturers Limited; of her winning a prime job as the editor of the women's page on 'The Observer' newspaper; of her meeting the sculptor Norman Mommens, who became her lover (and, very much later, her husband); of their travels abroad in the early 1960s looking for a place where they could live and work cheaply; and finally of them settling in Puglia where they renovated an old farmhouse, harvested their own olives, grew their own food and foraged for edible plants and weeds.

Adam Federman's 'Fasting and Feasting' is a well-researched, sympathetic and very readable biography and, although the author is admiring of his subject's writing and of her better qualities, he does not avoid revealing the less attractive aspects of Patience Gray's personality mentioning how she could be unsympathetic towards others' needs including those of her children and her mother; she was intolerant of those who were not up to her intellectual standards; she behaved badly at her daughter's wedding, upsetting other members of the family; and she rarely saw her grandchildren and found it easier to maintain relationships by letter rather than in person. That said, Patience was generous with sharing her knowledge, she dutifully kept up with her friends and family by post and her grandchildren loved receiving Patience's letters. Interestingly, despite Ms Gray's unconventional and European life-style, her son, Nicolas, commented to the author that although his mother may have been European in outlook "…she remained quintessentially English, even somewhat upper-middle-class, home-counties, blue-stocking Edwardian, specially in her speech." All in all, a very interesting account of an intriguing and independent woman who lived her life the way she wanted to and on her own terms. Recommended.

4 Stars.
Comment Comments (2) | Permalink | Most recent comment: Jun 22, 2017 10:04 PM BST


Summer In February
Summer In February
by Jonathan Smith
Edition: Paperback
Price: £9.98

3.0 out of 5 stars Summer in February, 16 Jun. 2017
This review is from: Summer In February (Paperback)
It is 1949, we are at the Royal Academy Annual Banquet in the presence of Winston Churchill, the Duke of Gloucester and the Archbishop of Canterbury, when Sir Alfred Munnings, the retiring President of the Academy, makes publicly known his low opinion of modern art. And it is not only those present at the banquet who hear Munnings' attack on Picasso and Matisse et al, but also the many people listening in to the BBC's live radio broadcast, one of whom is the artist Laura Knight, an old friend of Sir Alfred's from the days when Laura and her husband, Harold, were neighbours of Munnings' in the artists' community at Lamorna Cove in Cornwall. The story then moves back over thirty years to before the First World War, when the flamboyant and confident Munnings meets the beautiful Florence Carter-Wood who has come to Lamorna Cove to stay with her brother and to study at the Forbes School of Painting in Newlyn. Munnings, who is struck by Florence's beauty, persuades her to pose for him and, as the pair spend time together, they become very close - a situation that causes pain for Major Gilbert Evans, the local land agent, who has become friendly with the Lamorna artists, and who has fallen in love with Florence. And so begins a love triangle that ends in a tragedy which leaves no one unscathed by the repercussions.

Basing his story on real life characters, Jonathan Smith writes well of situation and setting, but although he deftly evokes the atmosphere of this section of the artists' colony, there is much we do not know about these characters and their inner lives. Of course, as these characters were real people, Mr Smith has had to keep to what is known about them and although he can invent conversations for them, he cannot know their inner thoughts and motivations or explain exactly why they behave the way they do, and despite Alfred Munnings being quite well-portrayed, I found the other characters to be less well-fleshed and Florence didn't really come alive for me, which is a shame. I've had this book in one of my bookcases for some time and was looking forward to reading it, hoping to gain a little more insight into the relationship between Florence and Alfred Munnings, but I was a little disappointed. That's not to say that I didn't find this an interesting read, because I did, but despite this novel being a poignant and tragic story which is made all the more tragic by it being based on fact, it didn't engage me quite as much as I had hoped it would or expected it to.

3 Stars


Edith Sitwell, a Unicorn Among Lions
Edith Sitwell, a Unicorn Among Lions
by Victoria Glendinning
Edition: Hardcover

5.0 out of 5 stars An Excellent Biography, 13 Jun. 2017
In the 'Foreword' to her excellent biography of the poet Edith Sitwell, Victoria Glendinning tells of an interesting conversation she had at a party in London just after she began working on her book. She writes that after mentioning she was working on a biography of Edith Sitwell, one of the party guests stated what a dreadful poet Ms Sitwell was, and another guest disagreed entirely. The first speaker was a professor of English and a professional literary critic and the second was an academic also, but twenty years younger. This conversational exchange, Ms Glendinning comments, represents one of the difficulties in assessing the poetry of Edith Sitwell. Difficult maybe, but Victoria Glendinning, who refers to her subject as: "a poet of dream and vision, a musical wordmonger" has written an informative, sympathetic and well-balanced account of the poet, her life and her work.

Born in 1887 into a titled family, Edith was an unwanted child and, partly due to her unusual appearance and her "freakishly tall" height, she felt herself to be rejected by both her parents, but particularly by her mother. Instead, Edith formed close alliances with her brothers, Osbert and Sacheverell and, in 1914, with an allowance of one hundred pounds a year, she left Renishaw Hall, the family seat, and set herself up in a shabby London flat with a close friend. Edith's stark 'Plantagenet' looks, which she accentuated by wearing long, richly decorated robes, unusual headgear and ornate jewellery, soon began to attract attention, as did her poems which were published firstly in newspapers and then by publishing houses (initially at Edith's own expense); in addition, her rising fame and the parties she and her brother Osbert gave, brought her into the company of Arnold Bennett; Walter Sickert; Harold Acton; T.S.Eliot; Aldous Huxley; Leonide Massine; Nancy Cunard; Nina Hamnett; Roger Fry; Clive Bell, Virginia Woolf; Vanessa bell and other members of the Bloomsbury Group, amongst many others. Edith was photographed by Cecil Beaton and had her unusual looks captured in portraits painted by Roger Fry, Wyndham Lewis, Alvaro Guevara and Pavel Tchelitchew.

In this well-researched and enjoyable to read biography (which was first published in 1981 and which won both the Duff Cooper Prize and the James Tait Memorial Prize for Biography) the reader learns of Edith Sitwell's rise to fame through her poetry writing and through self-promotion; of her collaboration with her brothers and the composer William Walton for her 'Facade' series of poems; her editorship of 'Wheels' magazine; of her periods of success when Yeats hailed her as a major poet, and her more fallow periods. We also read of her relationships with those who surrounded her, of her feud with Wyndham Lewis; her (unrequited) love for Pavel Tchelitchew; her championing of 'new' talent such as that exhibited by Denton Welch and Dylan Thomas; and a whole lot more. As commented in my opening paragraph, this is a sympathetic, yet well-balanced account of an exceptional woman, who although courted fame and publicity and could be difficult with those whom she felt didn't appreciate or understand her poetry, beneath her startling outward appearance was an insecure and overly-sensitive individual who lived very much in her imagination, and one who was generous and very loyal to those she loved. In this biography Ms Glendinning has brought Edith Sitwell and her work to life, which is just what a good biography should do and, as such, is one I find easy to recommend.

5 Stars.


Edith Sitwell: A Unicorn among Lions (Faber Finds)
Edith Sitwell: A Unicorn among Lions (Faber Finds)
by Victoria Glendinning
Edition: Paperback
Price: £16.00

5.0 out of 5 stars An Excellent Biography, 13 Jun. 2017
In the 'Foreword' to her excellent biography of the poet Edith Sitwell, Victoria Glendinning tells of an interesting conversation she had at a party in London just after she began working on her book. She writes that after mentioning she was working on a biography of Edith Sitwell, one of the party guests stated what a dreadful poet Ms Sitwell was, and another guest disagreed entirely. The first speaker was a professor of English and a professional literary critic and the second was an academic also, but twenty years younger. This conversational exchange, Ms Glendinning comments, represents one of the difficulties in assessing the poetry of Edith Sitwell. Difficult maybe, but Victoria Glendinning, who refers to her subject as: "a poet of dream and vision, a musical wordmonger" has written an informative, sympathetic and well-balanced account of the poet, her life and her work.

Born in 1887 into a titled family, Edith was an unwanted child and, partly due to her unusual appearance and her "freakishly tall" height, she felt herself to be rejected by both her parents, but particularly by her mother. Instead, Edith formed close alliances with her brothers, Osbert and Sacheverell and, in 1914, with an allowance of one hundred pounds a year, she left Renishaw Hall, the family seat, and set herself up in a shabby London flat with a close friend. Edith's stark 'Plantagenet' looks, which she accentuated by wearing long, richly decorated robes, unusual headgear and ornate jewellery, soon began to attract attention, as did her poems which were published firstly in newspapers and then by publishing houses (initially at Edith's own expense); in addition, her rising fame and the parties she and her brother Osbert gave, brought her into the company of Arnold Bennett; Walter Sickert; Harold Acton; T.S.Eliot; Aldous Huxley; Leonide Massine; Nancy Cunard; Nina Hamnett; Roger Fry; Clive Bell, Virginia Woolf; Vanessa bell and other members of the Bloomsbury Group, amongst many others. Edith was photographed by Cecil Beaton and had her unusual looks captured in portraits painted by Roger Fry, Wyndham Lewis, Alvaro Guevara and Pavel Tchelitchew.

In this well-researched and enjoyable to read biography (which was first published in 1981 and which won both the Duff Cooper Prize and the James Tait Memorial Prize for Biography) the reader learns of Edith Sitwell's rise to fame through her poetry writing and through self-promotion; of her collaboration with her brothers and the composer William Walton for her 'Facade' series of poems; her editorship of 'Wheels' magazine; of her periods of success when Yeats hailed her as a major poet, and her more fallow periods. We also read of her relationships with those who surrounded her, of her feud with Wyndham Lewis; her (unrequited) love for Pavel Tchelitchew; her championing of 'new' talent such as that exhibited by Denton Welch and Dylan Thomas; and a whole lot more. As commented in my opening paragraph, this is a sympathetic, yet well-balanced account of an exceptional woman, who although courted fame and publicity and could be difficult with those whom she felt didn't appreciate or understand her poetry, beneath her startling outward appearance was an insecure and overly-sensitive individual who lived very much in her imagination, and one who was generous and very loyal to those she loved. In this biography Ms Glendinning has brought Edith Sitwell and her work to life, which is just what a good biography should do and, as such, is one I find easy to recommend.

5 Stars.


The Nice and the Good
The Nice and the Good
by Iris Murdoch
Edition: Paperback

4.0 out of 5 stars An Entertaining Read, 10 Jun. 2017
This review is from: The Nice and the Good (Paperback)
In Iris Murdoch's 'The Nice and the Good' we are introduced to Octavian and Kate Gray, a middle-aged couple who, despite neither of them being entirely faithful to one another, enjoy a happy marriage and a full life. They surround themselves with a variety of friends and relations, all of whom congregate at the Gray's comfortable, rambling, seaside home on the Dorset coast, where we meet: Mary Clothier, a widow, whose teenage son, Pierce, has fallen in love with Barbara, the daughter of Octavian and Kate; there is Paula Biranne, who is separated from her husband and is the mother of precocious nine-year-old twins; there is Theodore Gray, Octavian's valetudinarian elder brother, who left India 'under a cloud' and who struggles to contain his ardour for Pierce; and there is Willy Kost, a survivor from Dachau, who lives in a cottage in the grounds and who has never spoken of his experiences during the war, not even to Mary who loves him. And revolving around all of these people and their complex lives is regular visitor to the Gray's home, John Ducane, a civil servant colleague of Octavian's at Whitehall, who has fallen in love with Octavian's wife, and whose support and advice all of the characters in the story rely on in some way and another. When one day in Whitehall, a shot rings out and it is discovered that one of Octavian's employees, Jospeh Radeechy, has committed suicide, John Ducane is asked to conduct an enquiry into his death - a situation which brings Ducane into close contact with Paula Biranne's estranged husband, Richard, who discovered the body; with office messenger, Peter McGrath, a slippery blackmailer, who was involved in Radeechy's secret life; and with McGrath's beautiful wife, Judy, who makes a play for Ducane. As Ducane investigates into Radeechy's life and death, he becomes involved in a whole series of strange and even dangerous situations - not merely in his role as investigator, but also in his private life, but that is for those who have yet to read the book to discover for themselves.

First published in 1968, this story of morals with its Shakespearean tones and its large cast of unusual characters, many of them trying (if not always succeeding) to be good, made an interesting and entertaining read. However, the large number of protagonists made it difficult to become fully involved in their individual personalities and personal circumstances and, at times, my belief in these people and the situations they got themselves into was put to the test - but I cannot explain fully without revealing spoilers. That said, I always enjoy Iris Murdoch's writing, her descriptions are beautifully detailed and enjoyable to read, and although this is not my favourite of her novels (and apart from the scene where Ducane and Pierce are trapped in a cave with a rising tide, I have to say that I don't feel it's one I'll remember over time) I will say that I was entertained throughout the story and for a downtime read this worked rather well.

3.5 Stars.


The House of Mirth (Collins Classics)
The House of Mirth (Collins Classics)
by Edith Wharton
Edition: Paperback
Price: £2.50

5.0 out of 5 stars Beautifully Written, Perceptively Observed, 8 Jun. 2017
Edith Wharton's 'The House of Mirth' focuses on the beautiful socialite Lily Barton, who is in her late twenties and, after ten years on the 'marriage market', is still looking for a suitably rich husband. Brought up to be purely decorative, Lily seemingly leads a life of luxury and pleasure, but we soon learn that she actually has only a very small income and lives on the charity of a rich aunt who is becoming increasingly disapproving of Lily's gadabout life. Worried about her gambling debts and desperately trying to keep up with the rich set, Lily sets her sights on the very wealthy, if boring Percy Grace, but her plans to snare Mr Gryce are ruined when she becomes attracted to the dark and handsome Lawrence Selden. Mr Selden, however, despite finding Lily breathtakingly beautiful, is a man of only modest means and being aware of Lily's ambitions to marry well, he tries to avoid taking her too seriously. As Lily and Selden circle around each other, both attracted to one another but neither of them willing to commit themselves, Lily becomes desperately worried about her increasing debts and she foolishly approaches the husband of one of her friends to help her to invest her small amount of capital. When it becomes apparent to Lily that the money she has been receiving is not from the dividends on her own money, Lily finds herself embroiled in a whole series of events that eventually lead to her fall from grace, but to reveal more would spoil the story for those who have yet to read it.

Beautifully written and perceptively observed, Edith Wharton's story of New York society and the lives of the rich and idle, juxtaposed with the lot of the much less wealthy and those who fall by the wayside, makes for a compelling read. Aside from the story's main protagonists, this novel is filled with a whole cast of interesting characters and is it easy to become drawn right into Lily Barton's life and watch her as she travels towards her downfall. Although, as bystanders, we can see the mistakes Lily is making and we may become exasperated with her for her foolhardiness, Lily is not as shallow as she initially seems, she does have scruples and she avoids taking others down with her, and the reader (or this one anyhow) feels for her in her predicament. First published in 1905 and one of Edith Wharton's best novels, this is a poignant and resonant story and one to read, to think about and to then put back in the bookcase to read again later. Recommended.

5 Stars.


Page: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11-20