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Bibliomage (UK)

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Science for Heretics: Why so much of science is wrong
Science for Heretics: Why so much of science is wrong
Price: £3.99

5.0 out of 5 stars Science, but not as we know it., 20 July 2016
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Wow, mind-blowing stuff. Who knew how much we don't know? A thoroughly accessible read, that informs without patronizing. If science had been this interesting at school I might never have done an arts degree!


Slade House
Slade House
Price: £4.99

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Stop wasting my time ... I only have one life, 7 Jun. 2016
This review is from: Slade House (Kindle Edition)
Longing to give this less than one star. Has the author grown lazy since the superb Cloud Atlas. The plot of this work is not even paper thin, and the writing is risible. Main characters tell each other things that they already know in great detail. Isn't that writer's amateurish mistakes 101? Bring back the magic and intelligence of the early novels before it is too late.
Comment Comment (1) | Permalink | Most recent comment: Jul 12, 2016 11:21 PM BST


The Book of Strange New Things
The Book of Strange New Things
Price: £4.53

3 of 9 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars I only wish there were negative stars, 26 Jan. 2016
Having wasted so much of my life reading this rubbish, it pains me to waste more of it reviewing it. But if I can save one poor intellect the stultifying numbness of wading through this nonsense, it will be worth it. I can only assume that the author knows nothing about science or evolution, but somehow though adding them to a thin, meandering plot line would somehow be worth it. Basically he wanted to write a story about a primitive tribe living near an American army base, but couldn't find a convincing setting in the modern world. Undeterred he takes to another planet, and, indeed, seems to have been on one while he was writing this garbage. And the final big reveal is so breathtakingly stupid, I had to read it twice to convince myself that I hadn't missed something. I can only assume that the good reviews are something of the emperor's new clothes, and an attempt to read allegorical depth into a narrative that has none.
Comment Comment (1) | Permalink | Most recent comment: Feb 27, 2016 3:14 PM GMT


The helios disaster
The helios disaster
Price: £6.92

2.0 out of 5 stars At least its short, 4 Sept. 2015
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If you like books that use madness as an excuse for lack of structure and plot this is for you. It starts well, but never quite gets off the ground, and the classical allusions are mostly sparse and illogical. It has the merit of being short, however, and its exploration of depression is convincing and poignant.


Possession: A Romance (Vintage 21st Anniv Editions)
Possession: A Romance (Vintage 21st Anniv Editions)
Price: £4.99

5.0 out of 5 stars Here comes a warning, 19 Aug. 2015
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I'm going to give this book five stars, but warning ... here comes a warning. Possession is really two books. One is written by a genius, who draws the reader into a Victorian landscape with poignant subtlety. The second book is set in the present day and appears to have been written by a sixth former, who turned out to be less talented than we'd hoped. Look out for endless prosaic descriptions and possibly the clumsiest use of the colour, green, ever to have made it to print.

The book IS worth reading for the poetry alone. However, I suggest you run your eyes swiftly down the modern sections on the basis that the story is not intended as a comedy. Though, if you want a laugh, count how many times characters suddenly remember that they are not from the south of England and throw in a bit of accent for a line or two.


Wasp: or A Very Sweet Power
Wasp: or A Very Sweet Power
Price: £5.03

3.0 out of 5 stars Tries a bit too hard to be a feminist polemic written by a man., 21 Jun. 2015
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The book opens well, but somehow never quite lives up to its promise. Far too much time is given to recounting the characters' pasts, which makes the forward thrust of the story slow and disappointing. Some of the language is also grating, and does not quite convince. But the worst flaw is the ending, which appears rushed and confusing, relying on unlikely revelations of the bleeding obvious.


The Bone Clocks
The Bone Clocks
Price: £5.99

3 of 9 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Not as clever as he thinks, 18 Jun. 2015
This review is from: The Bone Clocks (Kindle Edition)
I enjoyed Cloud Atlas and was hopeful that this would be in the same category. We are treated throughout to a wide panoply of characters while Mr Mitchell tries out his range of amusing accents. Then we are treated to a thinly veiled rant of the author's politics. He takes great care to point out that Muslims should never be judged or blamed for what governments or extremists say. And jolly right too. Unfortunately Mr Mitchell's non-judgemental agenda does not extend to Israelis, all of whom appear to be collectively oppressing Palestinians for all time. and when not being all murdery they invent bombs with horrific sounding names.

Just to add more misery to his readership he then attempts to mix the fantastic with the everyday, while congratulating himself on this never-heard-of technique. Might I refer him to Lanark or The Bridge, somewhat predating the author's work by decades. And finally, will someone please take Mr Mitchell's thesaurus from him. He doesn't know how to use it and has taken to throwing in random combinations in an attempt to hide a plot about vampires that wouldn't have made it as a script for Buffy.

I appreciate authors are now expected to churn out books, like sausages in a factory, but please, Mr Mitchell, stop and think before you write the next one. If you do not care about wasting your own life, think of the effect you're having on mine.


The Book of Splendour
The Book of Splendour
by Frances Sherwood
Edition: Paperback

5.0 out of 5 stars Splendid it most certainly is., 29 April 2015
This review is from: The Book of Splendour (Paperback)
Hard to believe this author isn't inundated with praise. Here is someone who can really write, whose characters live and breathe even as their worlds take a turn into the surreal. Thank goodness there are still authors like Sherwood out there who make powerful use of language without bowing to the dumb-it-down brigade. Please don't stop writing.


The Octavian Chronicles: Octavian: Rise to Power
The Octavian Chronicles: Octavian: Rise to Power
Price: £7.40

0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Written for infants, 26 Jan. 2015
If you like your history written in the style of an incompetent schoolboy, this is the book for you.
Comment Comments (2) | Permalink | Most recent comment: Jan 6, 2016 4:36 PM GMT


Giving up the Ghost: A memoir
Giving up the Ghost: A memoir
Price: £6.49

1 of 3 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Giving up the desire to go on reading, 25 Jan. 2015
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When Mantel opens up and reveals her pain, for example over her long term illness or her feelings towards childlessness,, the book is compulsive reading. Unfortunately the nuggets of gold are hidden amongst the self indulgent drivel that passes for memoir. I particularly like the assertion that people with non-creative jobs cannot understand the amazing imagination of those who write fiction.

Sorry, Hilary, you would have been ashamed to write in this pretentious waffle when you're in Tudor character.


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